The Centre for Child Protection

High Quality Child Protection Training, study & research


Child Protection Simulation

The child protection simulation (serious game) concept offers a safe new medium to explore and reflect upon child protection assessment. It offers professionals, at all stages of their careers, a unique way to evaluate child protection situations.

Building upon 'Rosie 1' (the prototype game released in June 2011) 'Rosie 2' is focussed on the same family five years on. It tackles chronic neglect in what has now become a long-term case, involving several changes of social worker.

'Rosie 2' promotes the theme of inter-professional practice by exploring the boundaries and challenges of undertaking a joint visit to the family by a health visitor and social worker. The game addresses on-going assessment, direct work with children and families, multi-agency perspectives and priorities, as well as the communications skills required when working with complex family dynamics.

'Rosie 2' offers those responsible for CPD a unique opportunity to provide up-to-date and innovative training for health and social work practitioners by immersing in a realistic and research-based case. It also provides opportunities for discussion and reflection to determine the outcome for the family.

"It is highly original for this area of work, and provides a new dimension for assisting people to develop their skills."
Social worker

 

"The work currently being developed by the Centre for Child Protection is innovative and much needed in terms of CPD."
Senior Practitioner

 

"Real potential for multi agency training and professional knowledge sharing."
Health visitor

 

"Innovative and exciting, uses multi agency contexts and individual situations and professionals."
Services manager

 

"Inter-professional learning of this quality on CP is long overdue."
Midwife

 

" 'Rosie 1' was an interesting departure from a paper-based case study – I am really looking forward to Rosie 2, 3 and 4!"
Health visitor

 

Centre for Child Protection - © University of Kent

Centre for Child Protection, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ

Last Updated: 08/07/2013