Powered Transporters (including E-scooters)

As per the University's Regulations of the Management of Traffic the University of Kent does not give permission for any persons to use a powered transporter on its land. 

Permission is only given to Bird hire E-Scooters only. All other riders or users of powered transport on University land may be subject to the sanctions for non-compliance as per the Regulations of the Management of Traffic at the University of Kent. If a private e-scooter battery is found to be charging on campus all persons are encouraged to unplug them if safe to do so for health and safety reasons and report to Campus Security or if living in halls to the Accommodation Office.

Background

“Powered transporters” is a term used to cover a variety of novel and emerging personal transport devices that are powered by a motor, including e-scooters. Further information can be found on Department for Transport website.

Given how powered transporters are motorised and designed, they fall within the legal definition of a “motor vehicle”. Therefore the laws that apply to motor vehicles apply to powered transporters.

It is illegal to use a powered transporter:

  • on a public road without complying with a number of legal requirements, which potential users will find very difficult
  • in spaces that are set aside for use by pedestrians, cyclists, and horse-riders; this includes on the pavement and in cycle lanes

Any person who uses a powered transporter on a public road or other prohibited space in breach of the law is committing a criminal offence and can be prosecuted.

Bird E-Scooters

Bird hire E-scooters form part of the DfT trial with Kent County Council and is in partnership with Canterbury City Council supported by Christ Church University and University of Kent.

We are working closely with this partnership to help them with this trial to establish help to understand whether e-scooters can truly reduce motor traffic in the UK and be efficiently integrated into existing networks, as well as, assess their safety implications for riders, pedestrians and other road users.

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