Portrait of Professor Jane Reeves

Professor Jane Reeves

Co-Director of the Centre for Child Protection (CCP)
Professor of Teaching, Learning and Innovation in Child Protection
Director of Studies, Advanced Masters in Child Protection

About

A qualified social worker, Jane completed her MPhil (Kent) and PhD (Open University) analysing young people, in or on the cusp of the care system, who were young parents. 

Research interests

Since becoming Co-Director of the Centre for Child Protection (CCP), Jane has worked in partnership with a variety of statutory and third sector agencies and led and co-written several immersive simulations. The simulations tackle complex inter-professional issues including sexual abuse (‘Rosie 1’ 2011); neglect (‘Rosie 2’ 2012); radicalisation and extremism (‘Zak’ 2013); paedophilia (‘Elliot’ 2013) and child sexual exploitation (‘Looking out for Lottie’ 2014) and she is currently working with CAFCASS on ‘Rosie goes to court’ (2015) a simulation for professionals and young people on the experience of the court and court processes. The simulations have attracted a variety of awards and are being widely used across the UK by professionals and, in the cases of ‘Zak’ and ‘Lottie’, directly with young people.

Jane is currently working with the Home Office on a second simulation on radicalisation called ‘Behind Closed Doors’.     

Jane's research and publication interests have recently developed to working with psychology to evaluate the simulations developed by the Centre, recently completing a study using eye tracker and emotion reader software to evaluate professional responses to situations in the simulations and evaluating the effectiveness of Zak with teachers as a teaching tool in the classroom. She has also recently completed project Rita, collaborating with the University of Portsmouth and two SME’s to design a new approach to artificially intelligent care. 

Jane is also the lead on an Innovation Grant from the DfE to investigate how traumatised young people use technology and to see if technology can be used more effectively for young people in care to keep them safe and she is working on a European Erasmus Project with the University of Stirling looking at how child protection is taught across Europe.

Teaching

Professor Reeves is Director of Studies, Advanced Masters in Child Protection 

Professional

CCP Awards

Lecture video

Publications

Showing 50 of 63 total publications in the Kent Academic Repository. View all publications.

Article

  • Reeves, J., Green, T., Marsden, L. and Shaw, N. (2017). myCourtroom: Rosie’s family go to court; the use of simulations in preparing social workers for court. Social Work Education [Online] 37:234-249. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/02615479.2017.1391772.
    The role of social workers in court, how they prepare, train, write and present their reports, has been the focus of much debate. Key messages from research tell us that social workers often find court work stressful; they can lack confidence in writing reports giving evidence and being cross examined. Pre-qualification training in this area can be patchy, with many workers reporting they often learn ‘on the job.’
    This article documents the journey from analysing primary and secondary research findings, via a partnership between the University of Kent Centre for Child Protection and Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (Cafcass), to develop a training simulation for practitioners to increase their knowledge, preparation and practice for court. The partnership turned these research findings into an interactive, immersive simulation to give practitioners the space to reflect upon and critique their experiences of court. Findings from an initial evaluation of the simulation were positive with participants highly rating its usefulness in developing court room skills and knowledge.
  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2015). Radicalisation and Child Protection: thinking it through. Community Care [Online]. Available at: https://www.ccinform.co.uk/practice-guidance/prevent-and-social-work-policy-procedures-and-resources/.
    Part of: Practical Guidance - Prevent and social work: policy, procedures and resources
  • Reeves, J., Sheriyar, A. and Shemmings, D. (2015). Radicalisation and Extremism: a guide for social workers and those involved in social care. Community Care Inform [Online]. Available at: https://www.ccinform.co.uk/practice-guidance/prevent-and-social-work-policy-procedures-and-resources/.
    Part of: Practical Guidance - Prevent and social work: policy, procedures and resources
  • Reeves, J., Drew, I., Shemmings, D. and Ferguson, H. (2015). ‘Rosie 2’ A Child Protection Simulation: Perspectives on Neglect and the ‘Unconscious At Work’. Child Abuse Review [Online] 24:346-364. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/car.2362.
    Neglect is the most common category for abuse of children under one. It is prevalent in large families; where there is a mother with low self-esteem and frequent changes of partner. Because neglect is difficult to work with, the Centre for Child Protection at the University of Kent has developed a child protection simulation – ‘Rosie 2’ – which is designed to train child protection professionals. It follows a social worker and health visitor on a virtual home visit to a family where neglect is a significant concern, and offers a safe opportunity to explore practice options. A small-scale research project has been conducted whereby highly sensitive eye tracker technology and facial recognition software were used to examine the emotional responses exhibited by social workers and health visitors during this ‘virtual visit’. The results indicate that the prevailing emotion exhibited by the professional group showed a ‘neutral’ response. There were significant differences between the groups, with health visitors displaying more sadness, and social workers demonstrating greater surprise and disgust. The article discusses these findings in the context of debates on compassion fatigue and emotional response within child protection. We conclude by discussing how the findings can enhance professionals' supervision.
  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2015). Addressing Radicalisation into the Classroom - A New Approach to Teacher and Pupil Learning. Journal of Education and Training [Online] 2:20-39. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.5296/jet.v2i2.7129.
    This article examines one response to the UK Governments directive that radicalisation and extremism should be tackled in all UK secondary schools. The small scale study, which is set in the broader literature of teaching often difficult PHSE topics to young people in secondary school and also the use of simulations as tools for learning in the classroom, analyses the responses of teachers to being trained with and using ‘Zak’ a bespoke research based simulation on the radicalisation process. An analysis of the teacher’s’ responses indicated that it was recognised that the principales of adults manipulating children, whether for sexual gratification or radicalisation, are considered to be very important topics for staff working with young people in school settings to address. It was also recognised as to be a flexible learning tool which enabled various pathways to be explored with young people in lessons to explore and raise issues regarding many aspects of e- safety, not just radicalisation. Additionally, the teachers remarked that the social media ‘Facebook’ format of the simulation was appreciated by the young people and this appeal resulted in their immersion with it as a teaching aid. Also of significance was how the ‘Zak’ package was delivered into schools with the staff reporting that the inter-professional training delivered by specialist police trainers and the accompanying materials enhanced the learning and confidence of the teachers on this multi-faceted and complex topic.
  • Reeves, J. and Heptinstall, T. (2011). The ones left behind: hearing the stories of young women with partners in prison. Community Practitioner 84:22-25.
    Research into the families of male prisoners has largely focused on the experience of older prisoners' wives and prisoners' children. This smallscale two-stage study collected quantitative data from 26 women (aged 18 to 24) and carried out narrative interviews focused on the lives and experiences of 10 young women and their children. These interviews are reported upon within this paper. The study also explored perceived support needs the young women had and how these were being met by the Prison Advice and Care Trust, other statutory and voluntary agencies and social and family networks. The main findings related to the social support networks the young mothers had, contact with health and social care professionals, prison visits and family life. The women's accounts of their lives revealed a level of resilience whereby, in the presence of familial protective factors, they adapted to difficult relationships and situations in their lives. This study provides a new perspective into the experiences of a group of women who may have contact with health and social care professionals, and midwives and health visitors in particular. It recommends that there needs to be increased awareness regarding the whereabouts of partners.
  • Reeves, J. and Shemmings, D. (2011). The use of serious games in child protection. Community Care.
  • Reeves, J., Gale, L., Webb, J., Delaney, R. and Cocklin, N. (2009). Focusing on young men:developing integrated services for young fathers. Community Practitioner 82:18-21.
    While some girls cope well as teenage mothers and often have a range of support services, young fathers do not often access services in their own right. This paper reviews literature about services for young men from the time they become sexually active. Through the use of a case study, it then asks questions about the type and nature of services required by young fathers. Health and social care practitioners may identify critical points in the life of a young father and offer appropriate services and 'joined-up' intervention, thereby facilitating long- and short-term involvement in the life of the child.
  • Reeves, J. (2008). Young mothers in care, contributing to the contemporary debate. Practice: Social Work in Action [Online]:37-50. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09503150308416933.
    Teenage pregnancy has become a broad issue in contemporary society and has become a focus for concern for young women in or exiting the care system. The article draws on interviews with twenty-four young mothers in, or on the fringes of the care system. It highlights the thoughts and feelings of these young women, specifically looking at the relationships that they have with their mothers, the father of their baby and their social workers. The mothers' sources of support and their perceptions of these are discussed. Implications for practice for working with this discrete group of young mothers are explored.

Book

  • Reeves, J., Shemmings, D., Green, T., Abbotts, H. and Marsden, L. (2016). Training Pack: ’myCourtroom’ Rosies Family Go to Court. [Web resource]. University of Kent and Cafcass. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/02615479.2017.1391772.
    The role of social workers in court, how they prepare, train, write and present their reports, has been the focus of much debate. Key messages from research tell us that social workers often find court work stressful; they can lack confidence in writing reports giving evidence and being cross-examined. Pre-qualification training in this area can be patchy, with many workers reporting they often learn ‘on the job.’ This article documents the journey from analysing primary and secondary research findings, via a partnership between the University of Kent Centre for Child Protection and Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (Cafcass), to develop a training simulation for practitioners to increase their knowledge, preparation and practice for court. The partnership turned these research findings into an interactive, immersive simulation to give practitioners the space to reflect upon and critique their experiences of court. Findings from an initial evaluation of the simulation were positive with participants highly rating its usefulness in developing courtroom skills and knowledge.

Book section

  • Reeves, J. (2009). ‘Tell me your story’: Applied ethics in narrative research with young fathers. In: Doing Children’s Geographies: Methodological Issues in Research With Young People. Routledge, pp. 71-83. Available at: http://www.tandf.net/books/details/9780415761970/.
    Doing Children’s Geographies provides a useful resource for all those embarking on research with young people. Drawing on reflections from original cutting-edge research undertaken across three continents, the book focuses on the challenges researchers face when working with children, youth and their families. The book is divided into three sections. The first section provides alternatives to some of the difficulties researchers face and highlights methodological innovations as geographers uncover new and exciting ways of working. The second part specifically addresses the issues surrounding children and youth’s participation providing critiques of current practice and offering alternatives for increasing young people’s involvement in research design. Finally, the book broadens to a consideration of wider areas of concern for those working with children and youth. This section discusses the nature of childhood in relation to research, the place of emotions in research with young people and the process of undertaking applied research.

Conference or workshop item

  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2016). Using Zak as a tool to Prevent radicalisation with young people. In: National Prevent Conferences.
  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2015). Using Zak to safeguard vulnerable adults. In: Safeguarding Adults Conference.
  • Reeves, J. (2015). Using Simulations as a tool for tackling CSE with professionals and young people. In: Tackling Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse Conference.
  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2015). The key role of social workers in preventing radicalisation. In: Community Care Live.
  • Reeves, J. and Wilkinson, N. (2015). Zak a new approach to preventing radicalisation. In: European Commission, Directorate General for Education and Culture.
  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2015). Policy into practice; using Zak to tackle extremism in schools. In: Westminster Briefing Event; Tackling Extremism in Schools: Protecting Children in Your Area.
  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2015). Using Zak in the University context. In: Universities UK Conference - Implementing the New Prevent Statutory Duty: Understanding Expectations and Ensuring Compliance.
  • Reeves, J. (2014). The gamification of social problems; Designing serious games for use in child abuse and neglect. In: Seventh International Conference on E Learning and Innovative Pedagogies.
  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2013). Using Zak, an innovative, interactive simulation to explore radicalisation through the education curriculum. In: Youth, Education and Value Change; The School As the Keeper of the Status Quo or a Platform to Explore Values?.
    The purpose of this paper is to contextualise and present the innovative teaching and learning tool ‘Zak’ which has been designed to stimulate discussion amongst young people in schools on the topics of radicalisation and extremism (Borum, 2004). The tool has been designed to encourage young people to explore their views and values on these complex and controversial topics in a safe and facilitated way. Zak is currently being ‘rolled out’ to all schools in one demographic region in the UK (Kent). The paper explores the use of the tool and provides initial analysis of evaluative feedback on the product from groups of professionals. This tool has particular relevance to the value change conference as it investigates an innovative approach to exploring how values on the often contentious and controversial topics of radicalism and extremism are tackled with young people in secondary schools.
  • Reeves, J. (2012). Saving children’s lives? The development of simulations for child protection training. In: Ubiquitous Learning International Conference.
  • Reeves, J. and Heptinstall, T. (2010). The one’s left behind. In: Family Troubles Conference.
  • Reeves, J. (2010). Chair of Session on Vulnerable Families. In: International Sociological Association.
  • Reeves, J. and Stewart, J. (2010). Hotel or house at the Kent seaside? Implications for public health. In: Our Coast and Public Health Conference 2010.
  • Reeves, J. and Gale, L. (2009). ’We get on because we have to’. The experience of early motherhood for young women with children by more than one partner. In: 4th International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences.
  • Reeves, J. (2009). Contextualising the Evidence; Young Fathers, Family and Professional Support. In: Trust for the Study of Adolescence.
  • Reeves, J. (2008). Sons and mothers: Crossing the boarders of family relationships for teenage fathers. In: Society for the Study of Social Problems 58th AGM.
  • Reeves, J. (2007). Socially Excluded Young Fathers; Developing a Model for Multi-Professional working. In: Partners in Practice Day (Chair and Panel Member).
  • Reeves, J. (2007). Transforming Social work Practice, Education and Inquiry. In: Global Partnership for Transformative Social Work (Chair of Discussion Group).
  • Reeves, J. (2007). Absence makes the professional try harder? Meeting the needs of socially excluded young men who become fathers. In: Monitoring Parents; Childrearing in the Age of Intensive Parenting.
    Research on socially excluded young fathers has been minimally addressed in the literature (SEU 1999, 2004). Indeed, research on young parents which informs health and social care professionals is often presented ‘through the eyes of the mother’ (Reeves 2006). Young parents in general and young fathers in particular are notoriously difficult to gain access to and engage with (Tyrer et al 2005) particularly if they have had previous negative involvement with the statutory services. Moreover, as Daniel and Taylor (1999, 2001, 2003) point out, professionals working in the health and care services often have an intense ‘maternal’ focus and this often excludes fathers from discussion and decisions about their children.
    The focus of this paper, drawing on two narrative studies of young fathers aged between 15-24 from the US and USA, is to evaluate the features of professional relationships that young fathers describe as finding helpful. Indeed, the findings discuss moving away from a culture of parenting classes, which all the young men interviewed described as finding problematical and in some cases embarrassing, to a culture of support which actively draws on their strengths and helps them become providers for their new families.

Edited book

  • Reeves, J. (2008). Inter-Professional Approaches to Young Fathers. [Online]. Reeves, J. ed. M&K Update Ltd. Available at: http://www.mkupdate.co.uk/shop/books/social_care/inter-professional_approaches_to_young_fathers.
    With one of the highest teenage pregnancy rates in Europe, young fatherhood, as a site of economic and personal adversity, has become a focus of concern in Britain during the late 1990's. However, despite this policy interest there is surprisingly little British empirical evidence to review. One of the aims of the book is to draw together contemporary research evidence, social theory and policy which may effect how practitioners, students and academics conceptualise and work with young fathers. Consequently, each chapter illustrates the points it makes using discrete evidence from that particular field. Moreover, in order to make this process more 'user friendly' each chapter provides a summary of this literature and evidence. Finally, in order to make the book come alive it draws on case studies, which are drawn, variously, from two studies conducted by the editor.

Internet publication

  • Reeves, J. and Green, T. (2016). Learn As a Group: Using Research in Court Work [Web resource]. Available at: https://www.ccinform.co.uk/learning-tools/learn-on-your-lunch-using-research-in-court-work/.

Monograph

  • Reeves, J. and Marsden, L. (2016). Rosie Goes to Court – an Inter- Professional Training Pack. University of Kent.
  • Reeves, J. (2015). CPD Curriculum Guide for Social Workers Who Are Working With People on the Autism Spectrum. Department of Health. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/467394/Pt2_Autism_Guide_Accessible.pdf.
    Tizard Centre, Centre for Child Protection (2015) “A report on autism for social workers” Commissioned by The College of Social Work (written and published by the Dept. of Health)
  • Bradshaw, J., Mills, R., Beadle-Brown, J., Reeves, J. and Drew, I. (2015). CPD Curriculum Guide for Social Workers Who Are Working With People on the Autism Spectrum. Department of Health. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/467394/Pt2_Autism_Guide_Accessible.pdf.
  • Reeves, J., Blake, E., Pasco, C. and Bushell, E. (2014). Looking Out for Lottie an Inter-Professional Training Pack. University of Kent. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/game/Lottieindex.html.
    A 37 page inter-professional training pack with a literature review and worksheets
  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2013). Zak - Exploring Radicalisation an Inter-Professional Training Pack. University of Kent. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/game/zakindex.html.
    A 29 page inter-professional training pack with a literature review and activities relating to the simulation
  • Reeves, J., Shemmings, D., Petit, A., Smith, M., Shaw, N. and Pell, S. (2012). Rosie 2 Inter-Professional Training Pack. University of Kent. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/game/rosie2index.html.
    A 37 page training pack with literature reviw and worksheets to support the simulation Rosie 2

Research report (external)

  • Reeves, J. and Shemmings, D. (2014). Zak Evaluation for Kent Police. University of Kent.
    This evaluation was commissioned by Kent Police to look at the impact of the Zak simulation tool in Kent Schools (2013/2014.
    The findings were used to release the Zak simulation for National UK training. With thanks to Maria Le Hane (researcher).

Software

  • Reeves, J. and Marsden, L. (2016). Rosie goes to Court. [Online].
  • Reeves, J., Sheriyar, A. and Shemmings, D. (2016). Behind closed doors; a serious game simulation on young women going to Syria. [Online].
  • Reeves, J., Shemmings, D. and Blake, E. (2014). Looking out for Lottie: Child Sexual Exploitation. [HTML based game]. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/game/Lottieindex.html.
    The prevalence of CSE, cyber-bullying and online grooming are some of society’s biggest challenges. In response to this, the University of Kent’s Centre for Child Protection (in partnership with Kent Police and Kent County Council and NHS Kent Surrey and Sussex) has developed two interactive serious game simulations - ‘Zak’ and 'Looking out for Lottie' for use by professionals and young people. 'Looking out for Lottie' is a serious game simulation with versions designed for both professionals and young people, identifying how young people are groomed online for sexual exploitation. The simulation looks in depth at CSE, cyber-bullying and online grooming, gaining insight into grooming behaviour, how to spot it on different social media and, vitally, how to help victims protect themselves. After using the tool professionals can use Lottie for direct work with young people: to learn about grooming methods via social media in a real-life ‘Facebook’'Twitter' 'Instagram' 'You tube' style scenario and resource. By understanding the behaviours and implications of the characters, young people learn how to keep themselves and their friends safe on social media.
  • Reeves, J. and Shemmings, D. (2014). Visiting Elliot: Managing the risk of sex offenders in the community. [Flash based game]. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/game/Elliotindex.html.
  • Reeves, J., Sheriyar, A. and Shemmings, D. (2013). Zak, exploring radicalisation. [Flash based game]. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/game/zakindex.html.
    As a response to the UK Prevent agenda The Centre for Child Protection, KCC and Kent Police have worked in partnership to develop an interactive simulation tool which will provide teachers and young people with a tool to promote discussion in the classroom. It can be used in PHSE and Citizenship to explore the topics of radicalisation, extremism, online groomng and internet safety. It is currently being used in all secondary schools in Kent for this purpose. Kent police and the University currently host regular training days on the tool and have developed a training pack to accompany the simulation. in 2015 the tool has been released for National UK training and use.
  • Reeves, J. and Shemmings, D. (2012). Rosie 2; a case of neglect. [Flash based game]. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/game/rosie2index.html.
    Neglect is the most common category for abuse of children under 1 (Cuthbert and Ryans 2011; Brandon et al 2010). It is more prevalent in large families (Brandon et al 2010) where there is a mother with low self-esteem (Moran 2011), frequent changes of partner, and with parents who frequently miss appointments (Brandon et al 2010). Because child neglect is difficult to assess and work with in families, the Centre for Child Protection at the University of Kent has developed a child protection virtual learning platform (serious game simulation) - 'Rosie 2’ - which is designed to engage and train child protection professionals. It follows a social worker and health visitor on a virtual home visit to a family where neglect is a significant concern. ‘Rosie 2’ takes practitioners into an immersive world where it is safe to explore practice options and emotional responses to different scenes; the professionals have to make choices and decisions regarding what will happen to all the children and to assess the parenting capacity of the mother, Connie. The resource is a reflective, safe space for practitioners to discuss issues, assess and re-asses and take risks safely
  • Reeves, J. and Shemmings, D. (2011). Rosie 1. [Flash based game availible to download from link]. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/game/rosie1index.html.
    Rosie 1 is a child protection simulation which allows students or professionals to enter a family home on a seemingly benign section 47 visit and make choices and decisions about what to talk to the family about and how to say it. It offers the opportunity to experience a home visit and reflect on what goes on and to take risks about what to do, safely. As the story and narrative unfold (based upon a real case and empirical research) the events take a more sisnster perspective and raise quesitons about professional safety and the protection of children. Rosie 1 is the first in a suite of inter-professional serious game simulations developed by the Centre for Child Protection.

Visual media

  • Reeves, J., Garner, T., Powell, W., Dickson, B. and Carr, V. (2014). Rita - a Responsive InTeractive Advocate: George and Mrs Jones. [Two digital videos]. Igloo films. Available at: http://rita.me.uk/demo/.
    RITA (Responsive InTeractive Advocate) is a prototype software and elderly care service model that intends to support the restructuring of the multiple branches of healthcare into an integrative model structured around the individual user. The RITA service incorporates sophisticated artificial intelligence and emotion detection systems to support empathetic and expressive communication. The functionality of the system is wide, varied and modular in its potential to integrate with various existing and forthcoming assistive technologies. The vision of RITA is to promote good physical health alongside emotional wellbeing, and to support the retention of independence for older adults. The project is envisaged as a central component within a genuinely progressive service framework of healthcare. To illustrate the functionality of Rita two filmed vignettes were made, Mrs Jones and George.

Forthcoming

  • Reeves, J., Soutar, E., Green, S. and Crowther, T. (2017). Children and young people’s vulnerabilities to being groomed; what can be done?. In: Çetinkaya, S. ed. Contemporary Childhood. InTech.
  • Reeves, J. and Sheriyar, A. (2016). Radicalisation; whose responsibility?. In: Shemmings, D. ed. Child Maltreatment for Practitioners. tbc.
  • Reeves, J., Garner, T., Powell, W., Dickson, B. and Carr, V. (2015). The Responsive Interactive Advocate: Harnessing Advances in Digital Technology to Support Care for Older People. International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction.
    This article introduces RITA (Responsive InTeractive Advocate), a prototype software and elderly care service model that intends to support the restructuring of the multiple branches of healthcare into an integrative model structured around the individual user. The RITA service incorporates sophisticated artificial intelligence and emotion detection systems to support empathetic and expressive communication. The functionality of the system is wide, varied and modular in its potential to integrate with various existing and forthcoming assistive technologies. The vision of RITA is to promote good physical health alongside emotional wellbeing, and to support the retention of independence for older adults. The project is envisaged as a central component within a genuinely progressive service framework of healthcare. Within this article the design and functionality of RITA is outlined alongside an evidenced statement of its inherent value, an overview of development to date, and a review of the next steps that will enable the concept to be fully realised.
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