Portrait of Professor Glynis Murphy

Professor Glynis Murphy

Professor of Clinical Psychology and Disability

About

Professor Murphy studied PPP at Oxford University and then undertook her clinical psychology training at the University of Birmingham, following which she was employed as a Clinical Psychologist at the Institute of Psychiatry, London completing her PhD there.

Since that time, she has worked at the Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital, London and was the academic director of the DClinPsy course at Lancaster University.  She has worked at the Tizard Centre, University of Kent from 1993 - 2004 and 2006 to present, where she was Co-Director from 2012-2016. 

Research interests

  • Effectiveness of CBT for people with Asperger syndrome and social anxiety
  • Effectiveness of social care for ex-offenders with learning disabilities
  • Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural treatment for men at risk of sexual offending
  • Effectiveness of treatment for people with untreated Phenylketonuria (PKU)
  • Symptoms of abuse for people with severe learning disabilities
  • Capacity to consent to sexual relationships
  • Moral development and people with learning disabilities
  • Early intervention in autism

Teaching

Professor Murphy has taught on both the undergraduate and postgraduate courses at Tizard.  She developed and convened the MSc in Analysis and Intervention in Learning Disabilities and has been instrumental in developing the MA Postgraduate studies in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Forensic Issues. 

Supervision

She currently supervises PhD students most of whose research focuses on autism and learning disabilities and the criminal justice system. 

Professional

  • Fellow of the British Psychological Society
  • President of IASSIDD 2008-2012
  • Associate Director for the School of Social Care and Research until 2014
  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences
  • Chaired the Guideline Development Group on challenging behaviour and learning disabilities NICE 2013-2015 

Publications

Showing 50 of 184 total publications in the Kent Academic Repository. View all publications.

Article

  • Malli, M. et al. (2018). Austerity and the lives of people with learning disabilities. A thematic synthesis of current literature. Disability & Society [Online]. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2018.1497950.
    The Financial Crisis of 2008 resulted in many western economies implementing cuts in health and social care. This systematic review provides a holistic picture of the impact of austerity policy on the lives of people with learning disabilities (LD) and the collateral effects on the people who support them. Our review suggests that in the current climate of economic austerity, available funding to support people with LD is no longer aligned to their care needs. Cuts in disability services have adversely affected the well-being both of people with LD and their informal carers. Individuals with LD have lost social support and are experiencing increased social isolation. Heightened demands on family carers’ time have negatively influenced their wider roles, including parental functioning, and labour market participation. Our review provides the foundations for further discourse and research on the effects of austerity on people with LD and their family carers.
  • MacDonald, A., McGill, P. and Murphy, G. (2018). An evaluation of staff training in positive behavioural support. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online] 31:1046-1061. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12460.
    BACKGROUND: Positive Behavioural Support (PBS) has been shown to be effective in minimising
    challenging behaviour, and improving the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. Training in
    PBS is an important factor in achieving good coverage in the use of PBS. The aim of this study was to
    evaluate the impact of training managers of social care services in PBS. METHOD: A year-long
    training programme in PBS was delivered to 50 managers of community-based services for people
    with challenging behaviour. Data were collected pre and post training, and at 6 month follow-up. A
    non-randomised control group design was used. RESULTS: Data demonstrated significant reduction
    in challenging behaviour. However, there was no change in quality of life for service users.
    CONCLUSION: Training in PBS can reduce challenging behaviour in people with intellectual
    disabilities; demonstrating any impact of PBS training on quality of life remains a challenge.
  • Malovic, A., Rossiter, R. and Murphy, G. (2018). Keep Safe: the development of a manualised group CBT intervention for adolescents with ID who display harmful sexual behaviours. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour [Online] 9:49-58. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1108/JIDOB-10-2017-0023.
    Purpose
    The purpose of this paper is to focus on the development of Keep Safe, a manualised group intervention for adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display harmful sexual behaviour (HSB) as the initial phase of a feasibility study. National reports have highlighted the need for the development of specialist programmes, as adolescents with ID make up a significant proportion of young people referred to specialist HSB services and there is a lack of evidence or practice-based interventions for them. Aims included taking account of adolescents’ and families’ needs, motivations and practical commitments, integrating best- practice and being accessible and appropriate across different types of services.

    Design/methodology/approach
    Keep Safe development progressed from the practitioner/researcher collaborative young sex offender treatment services collaborative-ID through a project team, Keep Safe development group, comprising a range of practitioners with a variety of clinical expertise across services and an Advisory Group of people with ID. An expert-consensus methodology based on the Delphi method was used. The iterative process for the manual draws on the slim practice-based evidence from UK, New Zealand, North America and Australia.

    Findings
    Keep Safe comprises six modules distributed through 36 term-time young people’s sessions, alongside 16 concurrent parental/ carer sessions (some joint). The main focus of Keep Safe is to enhance well-being and reduce harm. Four initial sites volunteered as feasibility leads, and two more were added as recruitment was more difficult than foreseen.

    Originality/value
    National reports have highlighted the need for the development of specialist programmes, as adolescents with ID make up a significant proportion of young people referred to specialist HSB services and there is a lack of evidence or practice-based interventions for them. This study is innovative and valuable given the recognition that research and practice is significantly lacking in this area.
  • Bhardwaj, A., Forrester-Jones, R. and Murphy, G. (2017). Social networks of adults with an intellectual disability from south Asian and white communities in the United Kingdom: a comparison. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12351.
    Background: Little research exists comparing the social networks of people with intellectual disability (ID) from south Asian and white backgrounds. This UK study reports on the barriers that south Asian people with ID face in relation to social inclusion compared to their white counterparts.

    Materials and Methods: A mixed-methods research design was adopted to explore the social lives of 27 men (15 white; 12 South Asian) and 20 women (10 white; 10 South Asian with ID). Descriptive and parametric tests were used to analyse the quantitative data.

    Results: The average network size of the whole group was 32 members. South Asian
    participants had more family members whilst white participants had more service users and staff in their networks; 96% network members from white ID group were also of white background, whilst the south Asian group had mixed ethnic network members.

    Conclusions: Social networks of individuals with ID in this study were found to be larger overall in comparison to previous studies, whilst network structure differed between the white and south Asian population. These differences have implications relating to future service planning and appropriateness of available facilities.
  • Doble, B. et al. (2017). Economic Evaluation alongside a Randomised Controlled Crossover Trial of Modified Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Anxiety Compared to Treatment-as-Usual in Adults with Asperger Syndrome. MDM Policy and Practice 2.
    Background: There is a growing interest in using group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) with people who have Asperger Syndrome (AS) and comorbid mental health problems. This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of modified group CBT for adults with AS experiencing co-occurring anxiety compared to treatment-as-usual.
    Methods: Economic evaluation alongside a pilot, multi-centre, single-blind, randomised controlled trial. Costs from the UK public sector (National Health Service and Social Services) and societal perspectives, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), incremental net (monetary) benefit (INB), expected value of perfect information, expected value of sample information, expected net gain of sampling, and efficient sample size of a future trial are reported.
    Results: Over 48 weeks, from the societal perspective, CBT results in additional costs of £6647, with only a 0.015 gain in QALYs, leading to a negative INB estimate of £6206 and a 23% probability of cost-effectiveness at a threshold of £30,000/QALY. Results from sensitivity analyses support the unlikely cost-effectiveness of CBT, but indicate the potential for cost-effectiveness over longer time horizons. Eliminating decision uncertainty is valued at £277 million and the efficient sample size for a future trial is estimated at 1,200 participants per arm.
    Limitations: Relatively small sample size and prevalence of missing data present challenges to the interpretation of the results.
    Conclusions: Current evidence from this small pilot study suggests that on average, modified group CBT is not cost-effective. However, there is much decision uncertainty so such a conclusion could be wrong. A large, full scale trial to reduce uncertainty would be an efficient investment for the UK health economy.
  • Melvin, C., Langdon, P. and Murphy, G. (2017). Treatment Effectiveness for Offenders with Autism Spectrum Conditions: A Systematic Review. Psychology, Crime & Law [Online] 23:748-776. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1068316X.2017.1324027.
    Theoretical suppositions suggest a potential vulnerability in some individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) to displaying offending behaviours. Additionally, it is recognised that the features of ASCs may result in possible barriers to treatment. A systematic review was undertaken to
    identify empirical evidence examining the effectiveness of treatment programmes for offenders with ASCs and to explore the potential impact of ASC symptoms on treatment outcomes. The studies identified consisted of a small number of case series and a collection of case reports with little or no direct comparisons to offenders without ASCs. A synthesis of the findings highlighted variability in treatment approach and impact. Effectiveness was primarily defined by reduction in further offending behaviours and was found to be variable across the data. The potential relationship between the symptoms of ASCs and treatment outcome was explored with all case reports identifying the need for adaptations to treatment programmes, necessitated by the symptoms of ASCs. This systematic review joins an existing body of literature emphasising need for more controlled research into the effectiveness of offending behaviour treatment programmes for individuals with ASCs, and for further investigation into the impact of the clinical features of ASCs on treatment outcomes.
  • Murphy, G. (2017). The NICE guidelines and quality standards on learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges. Tizard Learning Disability Review [Online] 22:71-81. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1108/TLDR-12-2016-0044.
    Purpose
    In 2014, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) announced it was going to develop its first set of guidelines on learning disabilities. The topic was “behaviour that challenges” and in May 2015 NICE published a full set of guidance (371 pages) covering service user and carer experiences, assessment, risk factors and interventions for behaviour that challenges (NICE, 2015). The linked quality standards were published later in 2015. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

    Design/methodology/approach
    This paper explains the process of developing the guidance.

    Findings
    The final guidance is described in summary form, together with the quality standards.

    Originality/value
    This paper provides a brief summary of the NICE guidelines on people with learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges.
  • Murphy, G. et al. (2017). Offenders with intellectual disabilities in prison: what happens when they leave? Journal of Intellectual Disability Research [Online] 61:957-968. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12374.
    People with intellectual disabilities, if convicted of offences, may be sentenced to prison, but little is known about their life when they are released. This study followed up men with ID who were leaving prisons in England. The men were hard to contact, but 38 men were interviewed, on average 10 weeks after leaving prison. The men were living in a variety of situations and often were very under-occupied, with limited social networks. 70% were above the clinical cut-off for anxiety and 59.5% were above the clinical cut-off for depression. The men were receiving little support in the community and many had been re-interviewed by police. Community teams need to provide better support to this very vulnerable group.
  • Beckene, T., Forrester-Jones, R. and Murphy, G. (2017). Experiences of going to court: witnesses with intellectual disabilities and their carers to speak up. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12334.
    Background
    People with intellectual disabilities are more vulnerable to sexual abuse and are more disadvantaged in the criminal justice system than the general population. However, little is known about the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities who have allegedly been victims of sexual abuse and also been witnesses in court.

    Materials and Methods: This study used semi-structured interviews and a Grounded Theory approach to examine the experiences of four people with intellectual disabilities and four carers/supporters who had all attended trials.

    Results: Findings showed that after the traumatic incident of abuse, a court experience could become a secondary source of trauma. Experience of this trauma was dependent on the quality and quantity of support people received and the understanding of intellectual disabilities amongst the legal participants.

    Conclusion: The findings argue for better training for legal participants who are in contact with vulnerable witnesses and better support structures for alleged victims.
  • Malovic, A., Murphy, G. and Coulton, S. (2016). Finding the Right Assessment Measures for Young People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Display Harmful Sexual Behaviour. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online]. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12299.
    Background
    Previous studies and national reports have all noted that a significant proportion of the young people who display harmful sexual behaviours have intellectual disabilities. However, research on the topic has been scarce. This study presents a systematic review of the literature relating to clinical instruments specifically developed or adapted for adolescents with intellectual disabilities who display harmful sexual behaviours.

    Method
    An electronic search of databases was completed for published articles in English from the earliest possible date to the end of 2013.

    Results
    No published articles met the full search criteria. This confirmed the lack of published clinical measures, apart from two risk assessment instruments.

    Conclusions
    Given the lack of measures, it is recommended that the focus of future research needs to be on developing or adapting instruments that will offer researchers’ and clinicians’ empirical as well as clinical data on this all-too-often-overlooked population of vulnerable youth.
  • Blamires, K., Forrester-Jones, R. and Murphy, G. (2016). An investigation into the use of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards with people with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12266.
    Background

    This small, qualitative study sought to develop a richer understanding of the way in which the deprivation of liberty safeguards (DOLS) were being used for people with intellectual disabilities. It is important to note that this study was completed prior to the changes resulting from the P v Cheshire West and Chester Council judgement.
    Method

    Six DOLS cases were identified and two people involved in each case were interviewed (care home managers, key workers, social workers, specialist nurses or psychologists), using semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed using grounded theory techniques.
    Results

    The interviewees described DOLS as providing a framework leading to positive outcomes for the people they supported, in some cases avoiding inpatient stays. However, they had a number of concerns including lack of knowledge and training, potential under use of DOLS and disappointment with case law.
    Conclusion

    Overall, these findings are encouraging in regard to the specific individuals for whom DOLS applications were made; however, they also highlight the need for a stronger agenda regarding wider dissemination of information, and training about DOLS, as well as some reform.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2016). The people with Asperger Syndrome and anxiety disorders (PAsSA) Trial: A pilot multi-centre single blind randomised trial of group cognitive behavioural therapy. British Journal of Psychiatry Open [Online] 2:179-186. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjpo.bp.115.002527.
    Background: There is a growing interest in using cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) with people who have Asperger Syndrome (AS) and comorbid mental health problems.
    Aims: To examine whether modified group CBT for clinically significant anxiety in an AS population is feasible and likely to be efficacious.
    Method: Using a randomised assessor-blind trial, 52 individuals with AS were randomised into a treatment arm or a waiting-list control arm. After 24 weeks, those in the waiting-list control arm received treatment, while those initially randomised to treatment were followed-up for 24 weeks.
    Results: The conversion rate for this trial was high (1.6:1), while attrition was 13%. After 24 weeks, there was no significant difference between those randomised to the treatment arm compared to those randomised to the waiting-list control arm on the primary outcome measure, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety.
    Conclusions: Trials of psychological therapies with this population are feasible. Larger definitive trials are now needed.
    Declaration of Interest: None
    Trial Registration: ISRCTN 30265294 (DOI: 10.1186/ISRCTN30265294), UKCRN 8370
  • Malli, M., Forrester-Jones, R. and Murphy, G. (2015). Stigma in youth with Tourette's syndrome: a systematic review and synthesis. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry [Online] 25:127-139. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-015-0761-x.
    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder, characterised by tics. To our knowledge, no systematic reviews exist which focus on examining the body of literature on stigma in association with children and adolescents with TS. The aim of the article is to provide a review of the existing research on (1) social stigma in relation to children and adolescents with TS, (2) self-stigma and (3) courtesy stigma in family members of youth with TS. Three electronic databases were searched: PsycINFO, PubMed and Web of Science. Seventeen empirical studies met the inclusion criteria. In relation to social stigma in rating their own beliefs and behavioural intentions, youth who did not have TS showed an unfavourable attitude towards individuals with TS in comparison to typically developing peers. Meanwhile, in their own narratives about their lives, young people with TS themselves described some form of devaluation from others as a response to their disorder. Self-degrading comments were denoted in a number of studies in which the children pointed out stereotypical views that they had adopted about themselves. Finally, as regards courtesy stigma, parents expressed guilt in relation to their children's condition and social alienation as a result of the disorder. Surprisingly, however, there is not one study that focuses primarily on stigma in relation to TS and further studies that examine the subject from the perspective of both the 'stigmatiser' and the recipient of stigma are warranted.
  • Murphy, G., Gardner, J. and Freeman, M. (2015). Screening prisoners for intellectual disabilities in three English prisons. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online] 30:198-204. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12224.
    Background


    Prisoners with intellectual disabilities are known to be disadvantaged in prisons and to be more susceptible to bullying, segregation, depression and anxiety than other prisoners.


    Method


    In this study, nearly 3000 new prisoners entering three English prisons were offered screening for intellectual disabilities, using the LDSQ.


    Results


    On average, 75% of all new prisoners entering prison were offered screening, and only 14% refused screening. Overall, just less than 7% were screened positive on the LDSQ and prisons made some reasonable adjustments as a result.


    Conclusions


    It is argued that it is feasible to screen for intellectual disabilities in prisons and, given the inequalities to which prisoners with intellectual disabilities are subject in prison, it is time for such screening to be rolled out to all prisons.
  • Pilling, S. et al. (2015). Challenging behaviour and learning disabilities: summary of NICE guidance. British Medical Journal [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h2652.
  • Dix, L., Fallows, R. and Murphy, G. (2015). Effectiveness of the ADEC as a level 2 screening test for young children with suspected autism spectrum disorders in a clinical setting. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/13668250.2015.1014323.
    Background The Autism Detection in Early Childhood (ADEC) is a clinician-administered, Level 2 screening tool. A retrospective file audit was used to investigate its clinical effectiveness.

    Method Toddlers referred to an Australian child development service between 2008 and 2010 (N?=?53, M age?=?32.2 months) were screened with the ADEC. Their medical records were reviewed in 2013 when their mean age was 74.5 months, and the original ADEC screening results were compared with later diagnostic outcomes.

    Results The ADEC had good sensitivity (87.5%) and moderate specificity (62%). Three behaviours predicted autism spectrum disorders (ASDs): response to name, gaze switching, and gaze monitoring (p???.001).

    Conclusions The ADEC shows promise as a screening tool that can discriminate between young children with ASDs and those who have specific communication disorders or developmental delays that persist into middle childhood but who do not meet the criteria for ASDs.
  • King, C. and Murphy, G. (2014). A systematic review of people with autism spectrum disorder and the Criminal Justice System. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 44:2717-2733.
    This paper provides a systemic review of the available literature on people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the criminal justice system (CJS). The review considers two main types of study: those that examined the prevalence of people with ASD in the CJS and those that examined the prevalence of offending in populations with ASD. In addition, types of offences in people with ASD, co-morbid psychiatric diagnoses, and characteristics of people with ASD who commit offences (including predisposing factors) are considered. A combination of search terms was used in a variety of databases in order to find all of the available literature on this topic, and research studies were included based on specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. It was found that whilst there is an emerging literature base on this topic, there are a wide variety of methodologies used, making direct comparison difficult. Nevertheless it can be concluded so far that people with ASD do not seem to be disproportionately over-represented in the CJS, though they commit a range of crimes and seem to have a number of predisposing features. There is poor evidence of the presence of comorbid psychiatric diagnoses (except in mental health settings) amongst offenders with ASD, and little evidence of the oft-asserted over-representation of certain kinds of crimes. It is recommended that further research of good quality is required in this area, rather than studies that examine populations that are not representative of all those with ASD.
  • Ferguson, L. and Murphy, G. (2014). The effects of training on the ability of adults with an intellectual disability to give informed consent to medication. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research [Online] 58:864-873. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12101.
    BACKGROUND:
    This study had two aims: to investigate the capacity of individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) to make decisions about their medications, and to evaluate whether the provision of training (information) sessions on medications would increase their capacity.
    METHOD:
    Twenty-eight adults (18 male and 10 female), with a mild to moderate ID were included in this study and they were taking either Epilim, Metformin or Haloperidol medications. The participants were split into groups that comprised of participants taking the same medications. Each of the groups received three training sessions on their own medications. Capacity to consent was measured by the Adapted - Assessment of Capacity Questionnaire (A-ACQ), which was specially adapted for each medication type from the original measure (ACQ). Receptive language ability was measured by the British Picture Vocabulary Scale-II (BPVS-II).
    RESULTS:
    A two-factor mixed anova analysis indicated that the provision of training had improved the capacity of the participants to give informed consent to taking their medications. Analysis using Pearson's correlations indicated that increased levels of receptive language ability correlated with greater ability to give informed consent to taking medication.
    CONCLUSIONS:
    The provision of information that is formatted in a way that individuals with ID can understand may be a useful way to increase knowledge on medications. Further research that investigates the provision of information with larger samples is warranted.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2013). Asperger syndrome and anxiety disorders (PAsSA) treatment trial: a study protocol of a pilot, multicentre, single-blind, randomised crossover trial of group cognitive behavioural therapy. BMJ Open [Online] 3. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/ISRCTN30265294.
    Introduction A number of studies have established that children, adolescents and adults with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high functioning autism (HFA) have significant problems with anxiety. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for anxiety in a variety of clinical populations. There is a growing interest in exploring the effectiveness of CBT for people with AS who have mental health problems, but currently there are no known clinical trials involving adults with AS or HFA. Studies with children who have AS have reported some success. The current study aims to examine whether modified group CBT for clinically significant anxiety in an AS population is likely to be efficacious.


    Methods and analysis This study is a randomised, single-blind crossover trial. At least 36 individuals will be recruited and randomised into a treatment arm or a waiting-list control arm. During treatment, individuals will receive 3 sessions of individual CBT, followed by 21 sessions of group CBT. Primary outcome measures focus on anxiety. Secondary outcome measures focus on everyday social and psychiatric functioning, additional measures of anxiety and fear, depression, health-related quality of life and treatment cost. Assessments will be administered at pregroup and postgroup and at follow-up by researchers who are blinded to group allocation. The trial aims to find out whether or not psychological treatments for anxiety can be adapted and used to successfully treat the anxiety experienced by people with AS. Furthermore, we aim to determine whether this intervention represents good value for money.


    Ethics and dissemination The trial received a favourable ethical opinion from a National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee. All participants provided written informed consent. Findings will be shared with all trial participants, and the general public, as well as the scientific community.
  • Rowsell, A., Clare, I. and Murphy, G. (2013). The psychological impact of abuse on men and women with severe intellectual disabilites. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online] 26:257-270. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12016.
    BACKGROUND:

    In other populations, the psychological impact of abuse has been conceptualized as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD, DSM-IV, American Psychiatric Association (APA), 1994), but little is known about whether this is appropriate for adults with severe intellectual disabilities and very limited communication skills.

    METHODS:

    An informant interview, based on the framework provided by PTSD, but supplemented with additional questions, was developed and was used to elicit the emotional, behavioural and physiological symptoms of alleged abuse in 18 people with intellectual disabilities at three time points: in the 3 months immediately prior to the alleged abuse (Time 1), in the 3 months immediately after the abuse (Time 2) and in the last 3 months prior to interview (Time 3).

    RESULTS:

    The reports of the family and carer informants indicated that, following their alleged abuse, the victims experienced marked increases in the frequency and severity of emotional, physiological and behavioural symptoms of psychological distress. Over time, there was some alleviation of these difficulties, but psychological functioning remained severely compromised.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    While the established PTSD framework is appropriate for examining the psychological impact of abuse, some amendments are required to enable clinicians to examine fully the distress of alleged victims with severe intellectual disabilities.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2013). An evaluation of the EQUIP treatment programme with men who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online] 26:167-180. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12004.
    BACKGROUND:

    The Equipping Youth to Help One Another Programme (EQUIP) was designed for young offenders to address a developmental delay in moral reasoning, distorted cognitions and social skills.

    METHODS:

    The present authors undertook a single case series study and piloted an adapted version of the EQUIP programme with three men with intellectual disabilities and four men with a diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome, all of whom were detained in a medium-secure forensic unit for people with intellectual disabilities. Treatment was delivered over a 12-week period, and participants took part in four-one-hour sessions per week.

    RESULTS:

    The results suggested that treatment was successful at increasing moral reasoning ability, reducing distorted cognitions and improving ability to choose effective solutions to problems. However, treatment did not have a significant effect upon anger.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The EQUIP programme is a promising treatment, but further research is needed to investigate its effectiveness with men with intellectual or other developmental disabilities
  • Heaton, K. and Murphy, G. (2013). Men with intellectual disabilities who have attended sex offender treatment groups: a follow-up. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online] 26:489-500. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12038.
    Background

    There have been a number of studies of treatment for men with intellectual disabilities and sexually abusive behaviour but few follow-up studies. Our aim was to follow up men with intellectual disabilities who had attended group cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) for sexually abusive behaviour.


    Method

    Thirty-four men (from seven treatment sites) were followed up. All had attended SOTSEC-ID groups. The mean length of follow-up, since the end of the treatment group, was 44 months (SD 28.7, range 15–106 months).


    Results

    The statistically significant improvements in sexual knowledge, empathy and cognitive distortions that occurred during treatment were maintained at follow-up. In all, 11 of the 34 (32%) men showed further sexually abusive behaviour, but only two of these men received convictions. Analyses of the variables associated with further sexually abusive behaviour indicated that a diagnosis of autism was associated with a higher likelihood of further sexually abusive behaviour.


    Conclusions

    This study provides some evidence of the longer-term effectiveness of group CBT for men with intellectual disabilities and sexually abusive behaviour.
  • Triantafyllopoulou, P., Murphy, G. and McGill, P. (2012). Carer's views of sleep disorders in adults with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research [Online] 56:671-671. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2788.2012.01583_3.x.
  • Taylor, L., Oliver, C. and Murphy, G. (2011). The chronicity of self-injurious behaviour: a long-term follow up of a total population study. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities [Online] 24:105-117. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-3148.2010.00579.x.
    Background

    Self-injurious behaviour (SIB) is a relatively common problem for people with intellectual disabilities and it is known to be associated with various risk markers, such as degree of disability, sensory impairments, and autism (<link rid="b25">McClintock et al. 2003). Less is known about its long-term course however.

    Method

    The present study was conducted to examine the quality of life and changes in behaviour for a cohort of 49 people with intellectual disabilities and SIB who were all part of a previous total population study conducted in the south of England by <link rid="b36">Oliver, Murphy and Corbett (1987). Assessment tools used in the original study, and an additional quality of life measure, the Life Experience Checklist (<link rid="b1">Ager, 1990), were carried out with informants in the participant's homes or places of day activity.

    Results

    The results show that 84% of the sample continued to self-injure nearly 20 years on, with no significant mean changes in number of topographies or severity of SIB across the group. No one was living in hospital in this study (cf. many individuals in the first survey) but for those who had moved out of hospital, their SIB had not reduced. More people were receiving psychological treatment; more were also receiving anti-convulsant and anti-psychotic medications, though polypharmacy had reduced somewhat. The number of people accessing full-time day activities had decreased substantially, with 44% of people only accessing structured daily activities for 21/2 days per week or less.

    Conclusions

    The results of the study add to the growing evidence of extreme chronicity for SIB and the relative lack of impact of treatment for people in whom self-injury has become well-established. They imply that early intervention is essential if such behaviour is to be eliminated long term.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2011). The relationships between moral reasoning, empathy and distorted cognitions amongst men with and without intellectual disabilities who have a history of criminal offending: a comparison study. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities [Online] 116:438-456. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-116.6.438.
    Eighty men, spread equally across 4 groups, were recruited, including men with and
    without intellectual disabilities. The men were either criminal offenders or nonoffenders.
    Participants completed measures of moral reasoning, empathy, and distorted cognitions.
    The results indicated that the moral reasoning abilities of offenders with intellectual
    disabilities were developmentally delayed but were still more mature than those of
    nonoffenders with intellectual disabilities. Offenders without intellectual disabilities had
    less mature moral reasoning abilities than nonoffenders without intellectual disabilities.
    The differences may be partially accounted for by intellectual ability. The results also
    indicated that the relationship between empathy and distorted cognitions was mediated by
    moral reasoning. The findings have implications for the use of psychological interventions
    with offenders with intellectual disabilities.
  • Langdon, P., Clare, I. and Murphy, G. (2011). Moral reasoning theory and people with intellectual disabilities. Psychology, Crime & Law [Online] 17:101-115. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10683160903392384.
    Many studies conclude there is a strong relationship between moral reasoning and illegal behaviour amongst young offenders. However, there has been no research examining this relationship amongst people with intellectual disabilities. There is some empirical evidence to suggest that the relationship between moral reasoning and illegal behaviour may be curvilinear, such that lower moral reasoning and higher moral reasoning relates to lower rates of illegal behaviour and inappropriate conduct. Given this, and evidence that people with intellectual disabilities are reasoning at a lower moral stage than their same-age peers, it is proposed that some people with intellectual disabilities may actually be less likely to engage in illegal behaviour because they are reasoning at an earlier moral stage, while those with ‘borderline’ intelligence would be more likely to engage in illegal behaviour. This suggests that the relationship between moral reasoning and illegal behaviour is moderated by intelligence, and this has implications for the design of intervention programmes for people with intellectual disabilities, but further research is needed.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2011). Relationships among moral reasoning, empathy and distorted cognitions in men with ID and a history of criminal offending. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities 116:438-456.
    Eighty men, spread equally across 4 groups, were recruited, including men with and without intellectual disabilities. The men were either criminal offenders or nonoffenders. Participants completed measures of moral reasoning, empathy, and distorted cognitions. The results indicated that the moral reasoning abilities of offenders with intellectual disabilities were developmentally delayed but were still more mature than those of nonoffenders with intellectual disabilities. Offenders without intellectual disabilities had less mature moral reasoning abilities than nonoffenders without intellectual disabilities. The differences may be partially accounted for by intellectual ability. The results also indicated that the relationship between empathy and distorted cognitions was mediated by moral reasoning. The findings have implications for the use of psychological interventions with offenders with intellectual disabilities.
  • Langdon, P., Clare, I. and Murphy, G. (2010). Measuring social desirability amongst men with intellectual disabilities: the psychometric properties of the self and other deception questionnaire - Intellectual disabilities. Research in Developmental Disabilities [Online] 31:1601-1608. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2010.05.001.
    Background
    Social desirability has been construed as either inaccurately attributing positive characteristics to oneself (self-deception), or inaccurately denying that one possesses undesirable characteristics to others (other-deception or impression management). These conceptualisations of social desirability have not been considered in relation to people with intellectual disabilities (IDs), but they are important constructs to consider when undertaking a psychological assessment of an individual, especially within forensic contexts. Therefore, we revised two existing measures of self- and other-deception and considered their psychometric properties.

    Methods
    Thirty-two men with mild IDs and 28 men without IDs completed the Self- and Other-Deception Questionnaires—Intellectual Disabilities (SDQ-ID and ODQ-ID) on two occasions, two weeks apart.

    Results
    Men with IDs scored significantly higher on the SDQ-ID and the ODQ-ID than men without IDs. However, these differences disappeared when Full Scale IQ, Verbal IQ and Performance IQ were controlled in relation to the SDQ-ID, and partially disappeared in relation to the ODQ-ID. The SDQ-ID and the ODQ-ID had substantial internal consistency in relation to men with IDs (k = 0.82 and 0.84 respectively). The test-retest reliability of the SDQ-ID was good (ri = 0.68), while the test-retest reliability of the ODQ-ID was moderate (ri = 0.56), for men with IDs. The SDQ-ID had moderate (k = 0.60) and the ODQ-ID had substantial (k = 0.70) internal consistency in relation to men without IDs, while the test-retest reliability of the SDQ-ID was excellent (ri = 0.87) as was the case for the ODQ-ID (ri = 0.85).

    Conclusions
    The SDQ-ID and the ODQ-ID have satisfactory psychometric properties in relation to men with and without IDs. Future research using these instruments is proposed

Book section

  • Langdon, P. and Murphy, G. (2017). Treatment of Violence and Aggression in Offenders with Developmental Disabilities. in: The Wiley Handbook of Violence and Aggression. Wiley-Blackwell. Available at: https://www.wiley.com/en-us/The+Wiley+Handbook+of+Violence+and+Aggression-p-9781119057550.
    Historically, assumptions were made about a relationship between developmental disabilities and criminal offending behaviours. While some people with developmental disabilities, including people with intellectual disabilities, may commit crimes, there is no clear relationship between crime and developmental disabilities. For those that require interventions, there has been a marked increase in the development and use of psychological therapies to treat violence and aggression amongst people with developmental disabilities that would be considered criminal behaviour; the evidence to support the use of many of these interventions remains weak, with the exception of anger management training. Further work is needed to develop robust empirically validated interventions for both violence and aggression amongst people with developmental disabilities.
  • Murphy, G. (2016). Sexual relationships and adults with intellectual disabilities. in: Carr, A. et al. eds. Handbook of Intellectual Disability and Clinical Psychology Practice. London: Routledge, pp. 731-759.

Conference or workshop item

  • Triantafyllopoulou, P. et al. (2016). Ballet Burst: an intervention study to improve health and fitness in people with intellectual disabilities. in: 15 World Congress IASSIDD. Wiley, p. .
  • Malovic, A. et al. (2016). Keep Safe: group intervention for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and harmful sexual behaviour. in: 15 World Congress IASSIDD. Wiley-Blackwell, p. .
  • Melvin, C., Murphy, G. and Langdon, P. (2016). Autism and offending: A systematic review of treatment. in: International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities World Congress. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 708-708. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12305.
  • Murphy, G. (2016). People with IDD and the criminal justice system. in: 15 World Congress IASSIDD. Wiley, p. .
  • Chiu, P., Triantafyllopoulou, P. and Murphy, G. (2016). Life after release from prison: the experience of ex-offenders with intellectual disabilities. in: 15 World Congress IASSIDD. Wiley, p. .
  • Murphy, G. et al. (2016). Life after prison for ex-offenders with intellectual disabilities. in: International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities World Congress. Wiley-Blackwell, p. .
  • Malovic, A. et al. (2016). Adolescents with intellectual and developmental disabilities who display harmful sexual behaviours: adaptation of measures. in: 15 World Congress IASSIDD. Wiley, p. .
  • Melvin, C., Murphy, G. and Langdon, P. (2016). Adapted sex offender treatment programmes for men with autism spectrum disorder: Clinician and service user views. in: International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities World Congress. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 708-708. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12305.
  • Forrester-Jones, R. and Murphy, G. (2014). The right to a fair trial: is article 6 reality for defendants with ID? in: 4th International Association of Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities Europe Regional Congress. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 331-331.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2014). Group cognitive behavioural therapy for people with Asperger Syndrome who have problems with anxiety: the initial results of the PAsSA pilot treatment trial. in: Gatlinburg Conference.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2014). An evaluation of the EQUIP treatment programme with men who have intellectual or other developmental disabilities. in: Fourth International IASSIDD Europe Regional Congress. Wiley/Blackwell, p. . Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12103.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2014). Group cognitive behavioural therapy for people with Asperger syndrome who have problems with anxiety: the initial results of the PAsSA pilot treatment trial. in: Fourth International IASSIDD Europe Regional Congress. Wiley/Blackwell, p. . Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12107.
  • Bhardwaj, A., Forrester-Jones, R. and Murphy, G. (2012). Social networks of people with ID from different cultural backgrounds. in: Intellectual Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities World Congress. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 808-808. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2788.2012.01583_13.x.
  • Langdon, P. and Murphy, G. (2012). The People with Asperger Syndrome and Anxiety Treatment Trial: Protocols and Initial Experiences. in: British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies Conference. British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies.
  • Bhardwaj, A., Forrester-Jones, R. and Murphy, G. (2012). Quality of life of family carers from different cultural backgrounds. in: Intellectual Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities World Congress. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 804-804. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2788.2012.01583_13.x.
  • Langdon, P., Murphy, G. and Clare, I. (2011). The relationships between moral reasoning, empathy and distorted cognitions amongst men with intellectual disabilities and a history of criminal offending: A comparison study. in: Joint Congress of the European Association for Mental Health in Intellectual Disability & IASSID Challenging Behaviour & Mental Health SIRG.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2011). The relationships between moral reasoning, empathy and distorted cognitions amongst men with and without intellectual disabilities who have a history of criminal offending: A comparison study. in: Seattle Club Conference, Cambridge, 2011.
  • Langdon, P. et al. (2011). An evaluation of the EQUIP treatment programme with men who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. in: Seattle Club Conference.

Edited book

  • Murphy, G.H. and Mason, J. eds. (2014). People with intellectual disabilities and offending behaviours. New York: Springer Science.

Forthcoming

  • Lindsay, W. and Murphy, G. (2015). The treatment and management of sex offenders. in: Handbook on Offenders with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Chichester: Wiley/Blackwell.
Last updated