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Undergraduate Courses 2015

Classical and Archaeological Studies BA (Hons)

Overview

The great strength of Classical & Archaeological Studies is the hugely interesting and varied range of subjects it includes – literature, mythology, drama, archaeology, art and architecture, history, languages and philosophy – and the way they all connect in the study of ancient civilisations, including those of Egypt, Greece, Rome and their neighbours.

At Kent, you can do elements from all these areas inside one programme if you want to, or you can follow a more specialised pathway, in literature, ancient history or archaeology.

You also have the opportunity to learn Latin or Ancient Greek, which are taught at beginners, intermediate and advanced levels.

Much of European civilisation grew out of the classical world so it is not surprising that it is still highly relevant today, and enriching to explore and study. Canterbury, as a late Iron Age settlement, a Romano-British city, an Anglo-Saxon town, and a centre of early Christianity, is a good base for studying different cultures, with visits to local sites and museums as well as London museums and opportunities for archaeological fieldwork both locally and further afield.

Independent rankings

In the National Student Survey 2013, Archaeology is ranked 12th and Classics 14th for student satisfaction. Classics and Archaeology at Kent are ranked 8th and 11th respectively in The Guardian University Guide 2014.

Course structure

The course structure below gives a flavour of the modules that will be available to you and provides details of the content of this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules, you may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

CL329 - Introduction to Archaeology

The module will introduce archaeology as an academic discipline, providing grounding in basic concepts and methodology and techniques of analysis relating to archaeological evidence. It will provide background relevant to other archaeological and historical modules through examining aspects of the archaeological process in prehistoric, Roman and medieval contexts. It will enable students to make an informed choice of subsequent modules. Topics will include basic fieldwork methods and techniques, and an introduction to key topics in interpretation, such as society and culture, ritual and religion, technology, etc. through case studies e.g . of Pompeii, Sutton Hoo, and the Ice Man.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL353 - The Civilisations of Greece and Rome

In the Autumn term we start with Greece. The history will centre on Athens in the 5th century B.C. We begin with Solon’s reforms, then after considering the period of the Persian invasions we study the developed democracy with its empire under Pericles and its destruction in the Peloponnesian War. After 5 weeks, we move to the literature of the period, more specifically, the development of tragedy and comedy in fifth-century Athens, examining staging and dramatic conventions such as the role of actor, chorus and religious function and plot, especially the handling of mythological themes. We will analyse a selection of major plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes. Within this framework the module explores the role of tragedy and comedy as vehicles for public debate in the democracy, and its treatment of justice, religion, rationalism and patriotic themes.

In the Spring term, we move to Rome. In the Roman part of the course we shall treat the last century of the republic. Our focus will be on how that republic fell and was replaced by the empire whose founder was Augustus. Among the themes examined will be political violence, the intrusion of the army into political life and the rise of the warlord. In the literature part of the Spring term the module is concerned with the patronage of the arts (poetry, history writing, art and architecture) under Augustus, with the role of the arts as propaganda, and the thesis that writers were recruited to act as spokesmen for the policies and ideals of the principate. The central theme is the creation of enduring images of Rome and Empire, using traditional historical and mythological materials; alongside this the module treats areas of public policy such as moral legislation, festivals, religious reform and the position of women. The module is also concerned with the responses of the writers, whether as supporters of public policy, or as commenting on and reacting against it. Thus, its content is much better understood as a result of the historical development outlined in the first part of term.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL357 - Academic Practice in Classical and Archaeological Studies

This module is intended to teach students the academic practices required for study at undergraduate level with particular reference to Classical and Archaeological Studies. Practical skills such as the use of IT for word processing, referencing and research will be combined with the more complex issues of argument synthesis, analysis of primary evidence and written expositions.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL354 - Roman Emperors and Biography

Today most adults have a conception of the lives of Roman emperors derived from TV or film. Few can discuss how the nature of ancient biography shapes the way in which the modern conception of the Roman emperor. Biography was a genre developed under the Roman Empire, most notably by Suetonius. This can be seen as a response to the presence of the Emperor or Princeps, but is also the genre which created a cultural memory that was shot through with the morals associated with good and bad; virtue and vice and so on. Few dead emperors were ever seen a paradigms for the virtuous life; whereas the living ones provided moral exemplars. The module is designed to unpick our modern image of the emperors to reveal how biographies from antiquity constructs our image of the past.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL336 - Aegean Archaeology

A great many aspects of the Greek world in Archaic and Classical times can be traced back to the Great European Bronze Age civilizations of the second millennium BC: this is the world of Mycenaean palaces, of Minoan Crete (not to mention the minotaur!), and the Greek heroic age of the Iliad and Odyssey. It is also a world in which the decipherment of the Minoan linear B script as the most ancient form of Greek has opened up a culture almost unknown until the 1950s, and exciting new developments continue.In this module we shall be examining the Minoan and Mycenaean world by studying its religion, its art and architecture, its politics and script; and we shall assess the influence this world has had on the world of later antiquity.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL347 - Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology

This module is intended as a background for those new to studying Egyptology, but who want to pursue the subject from an archaeological point of view. It will explore the diversity of methodologies and debates concerning Egyptian archaeology. In doing so, it will introduce students to aspects of anthropological and archaeological theory, as well as the relationship between theory, fieldwork, and the resulting interpretation. The aim is to provide an introduction to the archaeology of ancient Egypt and its culture, monuments, and civilization. The module will develop an understanding of the wide range of archaeological material encountered at Egyptian sites, demonstrating how the study of material culture greatly contributes to the understanding of important aspects of ancient Egyptian culture (history, geography, material remains and society). The history of Egyptology and Egyptian archaeology will also be examined, including discussion of new excavations in Egypt, connecting recent work with the results of projects spanning the late 19th and 20th centuries.

The Egyptians created a dynamic, lively and complex society, and we know something of the lives of many individuals; by the end of the module students will have learned how to approach their remains in a scholarly yet sensitive way. Students will also learn how to overcome the particular problem inherent in studying an ancient civilisation with no living witnesses, making critical use of archaeological records.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL310 - Greek for Beginners

The aim of the module is to provide students with a firm foundation in the Classical Greek language. The text book used combines grammar and syntax with passages about a farmer and his family living in fifth-century Attica. As the story progresses, we move onto the Peloponnesian war and thus adapted texts of Thucydides. Reading is therefore ensured from the very first lesson. Extracts from the Bible will also be used. The module will follow the structured approach of Athenaze I (OUP).

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL311 - Latin for Beginners

This course introduces Latin to complete, or near, beginners, aiming to cover the basic aspects of grammar required for understanding, reading and translating this ancient language. Using a textbook, in which each chapter focuses on different topics of grammar, the students apply what they have learnt through the translation of sentences adapted from ancient authors. By the end of the course, students should have acquired an adequate foundation for pursuing Latin at intermediate level, in which they can advance to reading complete unadapted texts.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL315 - Classical Mythology:Themes and Approaches

This module aims to introduce students to the heritage of myth in the ancient world, both classical and non-classical, and introduce them to a variety of attempts, ancient and modern, to make sense of myth as a means of expression. In the Autumn term students will study a repertoire of well-known myths, selected to illustrate the main categories of myth found in the ancient world (gods, creation, hero, underworld, metamorphoses, animal stories, ideal worlds, trickster mythology); in the Spring term the emphasis will be on theories which attempt to explain the ‘workings’ of myth, offered from a variety of disciplines, ancient and modern, and on ways in which the Greeks and Romans approached their mythological heritage. These will include myth as history, myth as philosophy, myth as comedy, myth as ornament, comparative mythology, anthropological approaches, psychological interpretations and structuralism. The module will conclude with practical experiments designed to illustrate the processes involved in the creation and transmission of myths.

The module will be taught from texts in translation, and will involve the understanding of critical methods and the interpretation of sources. No knowledge of ancient languages will be required.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

CL513 - Intermediate Latin

This module is designed (a) for students who have successfully taken Latin for Beginners (CL311), or (b) for students come to this university with GCSE Latin or an equivalent qualification, or (c) for research students who need support. Thus the Intermediate Latin module will continue the formal instruction in Latin grammar and syntax beyond the level achieved in the Beginners' module and will give students practice both in elementary unseen translation, usually from classical authors, and in the study of classical texts.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL550 - Intermediate Greek Language

This module gives an opportunity by a new method devised by Balme and Lawall to study Ancient Greek with a view to acquiring reading knowledge of such classical authors as Homer, Plato and the Greek dramatists, so as to give students a firm foundation in Classical Greek language. The texts used consist of two volumes, (i) grammar and syntax, and (ii) a reading volume of simple extracts based on Aristophanes, Plato and Demosthenes. The two are taken in parallel so that the reading is ensured from the very first lesson, and puts into practice the grammar learnt.

Schedule will follow the structured approach of 'Reading Greek' (CUP), covering: alphabet and pronunciation; present, imperfect, future and aorist tenses of verbs in active, middle and passive voice and in indicative mood; all the cases and all three declensions of the inflected noun; use of prepositions, adjectives, pronouns, conjunctions, imperatives and participles].

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL571 - Early Greece and the Formation of the Classical World

This module is concerned with the history of Greece down to the end of the Persian invasions. Among the subjects examined in detail are the growth of the city-state and its constitution and the impact of colonisation on the Greek world.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL311 - Latin for Beginners

This course introduces Latin to complete, or near, beginners, aiming to cover the basic aspects of grammar required for understanding, reading and translating this ancient language. Using a textbook, in which each chapter focuses on different topics of grammar, the students apply what they have learnt through the translation of sentences adapted from ancient authors. By the end of the course, students should have acquired an adequate foundation for pursuing Latin at intermediate level, in which they can advance to reading complete unadapted texts.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL310 - Greek for Beginners

The aim of the module is to provide students with a firm foundation in the Classical Greek language. The text book used combines grammar and syntax with passages about a farmer and his family living in fifth-century Attica. As the story progresses, we move onto the Peloponnesian war and thus adapted texts of Thucydides. Reading is therefore ensured from the very first lesson. Extracts from the Bible will also be used. The module will follow the structured approach of Athenaze I (OUP).

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL582 - Rome: The Imperial Republic

Roman history in this period is dominated by two events: the acquisition by Rome of an overseas empire and the gradual disintegration of the Republican state. Both these developments will be examined in detail. Particular attention is paid to Rome's Diplomatic and military confrontations with the Hellenistic powers of the Eastern Mediterranean and their effect on Roman social, political and intellectual behaviour. The student will read a wide range of ancient sources, from Polybius to Cicero

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL589 - The Rise and Fall of Athens

This module examines, in detail, Greek history from the end of the Persian invasions to the fall of Athens in 404 BC. The main themes of the module are the rise and fall of the power of Athens and the role of the Persian Empire in Greek history in the 5th century.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL609 - Roman Art and Architecture

This module is designed to thoroughly introduce students to a well-studied aspect of Roman archaeology, that of its art and architecture. The module will cover the periods from the first century BC up to late Antiquity, including late Republican, Imperial and late Roman remains. The main areas of focus for the early part of the module will be the city of Rome and Italian sites such as Pompeii and Ostia. Sites in southern France and Spain will also be explored, as a means of questioning the influence of Roman styles in other areas. A multiplicity of types of sites will be examined for understanding Roman building techniques; these will include temples, fora, theatres, amphitheatres and housing. The art of painting, sculpture and mosaic work will be studied in conjunction with the sites. ‘Minor arts’ such as glass, cameos, jewellery, metal work and coins are examined in relation to their historical, spatial and social context. Throughout the module examinations will not only be made into the styles, development and changes to the art and architecture, but questions will be raised about the cultural view of the remains, which is important for understanding the roles the sites and artistic work played in Roman society. Here specific issues of propaganda, mythology, erotica and gender will be discussed. Moreover, the historical events will be explored to see what significance and influence they played on artistic and architectural styles, as well as patronage. Thus, the module will supply students with a thorough grounding in the multiple issues raised in the study of Roman art and architecture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL627 - Advanced Ancient Greek Language

In this module students will consolidate their knowledge of Greek grammar and syntax through a series of weekly revisions of material covered in Beginner's and Intermediate Greek, with weekly take-home exercises designed to assist in that learning. Students will also read a selection of Greek prose and verse designed to give them the linguistic and research skills necessary to satisfactorily read and understand original texts, making appropriate use of dictionaries and grammar resources. Some time will also be devoted to analysis of the content of the texts being read.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL648 - Roman Britain

The module will deal with the history of the province from the time of Caesar's invasion down to the final Roman withdrawal. Attention will be paid to the military, social, economic and cultural aspects of the Roman conquest.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL651 - Heads, Heroes and Horses: in search of the Ancient Celts

Peoples described as Celts sacked Rome in the early fourth century BC; they probably ravaged Delphi towards the mid-third century BC; and from the later second century BC they were in conflict with the expanding Roman Empire, ultimately becoming the majority of its subjects in the West. The intent of this module is to search for the Celts of Antiquity... but participants should not embark on the study with the certain expectation that they will be found! For long interpreted within a largely Classically-derived pan-European model, the archaeological evidence is now increasingly discussed in ways which emphasize the diversity rather than the uniformity of life and culture across west/central Europe during the centuries in which the Classical World was in contact with those whom it identified as Celts. The module will critically evaluate the evidence for the pre/proto-historic Celts derived from the Classical writers, the concept of a widespread European Celtic culture in antiquity, and the contrasting interpretations which can be generated by the archaeological evidence for the conventional pre-Roman Iron Age in Temperate Europe. There will be a visit to the European Iron Age gallery at the British Museum. (Students should budget for the cost of independent travel to London.) There has been a dramatic and exciting increase in the archaeological evidence now available to us for this era of the Iron Age in Temperate Europe in terms of sites, burials and finds and this will be examined appropriately.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL652 - Gods, Heroes and Mystery Cults: Religion in Ancient Greece

This module is an introduction to ancient Greek religion and Mystery cults. The module will offer an introduction to the major gods and goddesses of ancient Greece, spheres of influence, character, relationships, exploits, and worship. It is concerned with the analysis of religious festivals, cults, beliefs, and the development of religious architecture. The module will additionally briefly contrast Greek religion to Christianity, as an example of investigating how Greek religion differs from, and resembles, modern religions. The materials of the course are drawn from the ancient Greeks themselves —from archaeology, Greek poets, artists, playwrights, mythographers, and philosophers from the 10th–2nd centuries BC.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL654 - Hellenistic Literature and Culture

In this module students will examine the literature and culture of the period of Hellenistic kingdoms following the death of Alexander of Macedon, with a strong focus on the role of the libraries that developed in the Hellenistic kingdoms and the changes to Greek material culture that arise from the contact with Near Eastern cultures. There will also be discussion of developments in religion and philosophy in that period and its impact on literature and culture and on Roman society.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL663 - Greek and Roman Medicine

When questioning people about their understandings of classical medicine two extreme responses are usually given, the first that there was no medicine, or a very crude and ritualistic form of healing and the second response being that it was entirely rational with no religious influences. Yet, both responses demonstrate a narrow understanding of the subject. Classical medicine was a complex mixture of what we would consider ‘rational’ and ‘irrational’ ideas and practices for the causes and cures of disease and illness. In this module students will use the various sources of evidence that survive in the literary, archaeological and epigraphic record to learn about the subject. An historical approach will be used starting with and examination of the pre-Socratic philosophers’ and Hippocratic writers’ ideas about the body and medicine, moving into the Hellenistic period examining the dissections and vivisections of Herophilus and Erasistratus. The archaeological material from Greek healing sanctuaries will add to the understanding of Greek medicine. From here, the study will move into the Roman period. Questions will be addressed about the influence of Greek medicine on Roman medicine and the archaeological remains of instruments and buildings associated with healing, such as baths, sanctuaries and possible hospitals will be examined as part of this enquiry. For the Roman period the works of Celsus and Pliny the Elder will be read for the first century AD and the module will culminate with a study of the second century writer Galen. Throughout the class students will examine ideas about rationality and medical influences from one society to another. Overall the student will come away with a strong understanding of the many issues of classical medicine.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL667 - Love and Sex in Roman Society

This module provides students with a wide range of perspectives on classical attitudes to love and human relationships against both a literary and historical background; and it surveys different standpoints and assumptions associated with the literary genres dealing with the subject. A wide variety of evidence will be evoked - literary, artistic and legal - to clarify the standing of men and women in ancient societies, and to notice shifting fashions in sexual morality.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL670 - Egypt and the Classical World

This module is concerned with the interaction between two contiguous but very different peoples, Egypt in the Late Period and Classical Greece. Though the Aegean world had a long history of contact with Egypt, the volume of contact increased dramatically under the XXVI (Saïte) Dynasty, with the foundation of commercial settlements, the development of vigorous trade relations and the arrival of many Greeks as traders, mercenaries and tourists. That contact had profound consequences both in the short and longer term. It provided an essential support for the last great dynasty of independent Egypt. It aided the rise of the East Greek cities of Ionia. It influenced the development of Greek sculpture and architecture. Equally important, it revealed to the Greeks a civilization which was deeply impressive, in many ways superior, yet alien. The immediate fruit of that perception lies in the stimulus to Greek thought and history writing, especially through Herodotus (a vital witness to Egyptian religion and society of this age). In the longer term it shaped the way in which the West perceived Egypt, creating myths about its antiquity, its religion and its wisdom which continue to affect us today, not least in the shaping of traditional Egyptology. The module will be taught from a range of sources, archaeological, papyrological, historical and literary.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL647 - Advanced Latin

This module is designed (a) for undergraduate and postgraduate taught students who have successfully taken CL513 Intermediate Latin, or (b) for students who come to this university with AS or A level Latin or an equivalent qualification, or (c) research students in category (a) or (b).

Students will practice grammatical work to maintain their familiarity with Latin grammar and syntax, but the main emphasis of their studies will be on prepared and unseen translation. Students will follow a graded programme of basic Latin unseen translation and of suitable Latin prose and verse authors for prepared translation.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL674 - Everyday Life in the Roman Empire

How do you imagine Roman Antiquity? How do the images produced for film, TV and popular fiction reflect the lives of those in antiquity? Can we see the everyday experience of Pliny, Juvenal or Augustine or of those who were killed in the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79? This module will explore everyday life in the Roman world, from haircuts, tattoos and gestures, to everyday rites and rhythms, whether domestic, social, political or religious, focusing on human experience, with its culturally specific organisation rather than abstract scholarly constructions. It will range from Augustan Rome to Late Antique Constantinople, and will draw on depictions, literary evidence (such as poems), original documents (from personal letters to minutes of meetings), inscriptions and especially archaeology, focusing on key sites where preservation is good, such as Pompeii, Ostia, Sardis and Petra. Here buildings, graffiti, occupation deposits and other traces will allow snapshots of everyday life to be constructed: of the houses, workshops, taverns, temples, theatres and churches of Antiquity. Students will be encouraged to undertake both empirical studies and imaginative reconstructions as part of their assessment, so that they understand the importance not only of describing what evidence remains of everyday life, but of actively reconstructing the past, and of engaging different types of evidence in a critical dialogue.

This module can be differentiated from ‘Romans in the West’ module by its specific behavioural focus on everyday activities and objects, whereas the other module is much more abstract and synthetic – focusing on urbanism, countryside and so on. Care will be taken to try to avoid overlap in lecture and essay questions with this and any other related modules.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL677 - Fieldwork Practice

This module will provide a credit framework for fieldwork training undertaken on University of Kent training excavations, or approved partners, normally supported by a SECL archaeological fieldwork bursary, to assist with the costs involved in a participation of 15 working days. The module will permit three alternative pathways, in excavation, survey or museum studies. Assessment will be in the form of an illustrated portfolio featuring a description of the project and an account of each type of work undertaken by the student. Project directors will be provided with a checklist of fieldwork tasks to be completed, of which a minimum number will be mandatory. Students who have no prior experience of fieldwork will likely be accommodated on a project in the UK, whilst those who are experienced may be offered a place on an excavation abroad. Skills assessed will range from efficient manual digging and artefact washing to site / find drawing or photography and the completing of pro-forma record sheets. (Students enrolling on this module should be aware that the practical element of the module will take place in the summer term prior to entering Stage 2 or 3, and constitutes advance credit. The coursework element of the module will be due in the Autumn term of Stage 2 or 3.)

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL692 - Monsters in Roman Literature

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL699 - Classical Studies and Ancient History in the Classroom

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL702 - Heritage Studies (with Internship)

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

CL504 - Classical & Archaeological Studies Dissertation

This module is intended to introduce undergraduate students to research. As such it provides an opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing, in either archaeology, history or ancient literature. Originality and feasibility are important aspects of writing dissertations, and to avoid problems topics will be scrutinised and approved by CLAS before research can begin. Students can expect guidance from the module convenor and an academic supervisor throughout the process, varying from one-to-one tutorials to classes on how to edit your own prose. There will also be a meeting regarding the Dissertation at the end of the Spring term of the previous year to clarify arrangements and to outline what work is required on this module.

The programme document with regulations is sent to all students at the end of spring term of Stage 2. Students are invited to suggest titles for comment, for which tutors are allocated. They are advised to do preliminary reading over the summer based on generic advice of the module convenor. They then choose precise topics in consultation with the convenor and personal tutors at the start of the autumn term.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL703 - Heritage Studies (with Internship)

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL699 - Classical Studies and Ancient History in the Classroom

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL677 - Fieldwork Practice

This module will provide a credit framework for fieldwork training undertaken on University of Kent training excavations, or approved partners, normally supported by a SECL archaeological fieldwork bursary, to assist with the costs involved in a participation of 15 working days. The module will permit three alternative pathways, in excavation, survey or museum studies. Assessment will be in the form of an illustrated portfolio featuring a description of the project and an account of each type of work undertaken by the student. Project directors will be provided with a checklist of fieldwork tasks to be completed, of which a minimum number will be mandatory. Students who have no prior experience of fieldwork will likely be accommodated on a project in the UK, whilst those who are experienced may be offered a place on an excavation abroad. Skills assessed will range from efficient manual digging and artefact washing to site / find drawing or photography and the completing of pro-forma record sheets. (Students enrolling on this module should be aware that the practical element of the module will take place in the summer term prior to entering Stage 2 or 3, and constitutes advance credit. The coursework element of the module will be due in the Autumn term of Stage 2 or 3.)

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL691 - Monsters in Roman Literature

This module explores the monsters of Roman culture, mythological and otherwise, treated as a series of self-contained but interrelated topics. Most were inherited from Greece but adapted for new tastes and purposes. Latin poetry in translation is the focus, and Virgil's Aeneid and Ovid's Metamorphoses are the central texts, but prose sources and the visual arts will be included where appropriate, as well as comparisons with earlier Greek sources. Major figures such as the Cyclopes, the Centaurs and Medusa will be included, but the definition of the 'monster' will be broad, incorporating (for example) the supposed bodily imperfections of emperors, or the strange features of personified figures such as Hunger and Envy. Lectures offering broader perspectives will be complemented by seminars which focus on the analysis of specific passages of text.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL675 - Everyday Life in the Roman Empire

See entry for CL674

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL647 - Advanced Latin

This module is designed (a) for undergraduate and postgraduate taught students who have successfully taken CL513 Intermediate Latin, or (b) for students who come to this university with AS or A level Latin or an equivalent qualification, or (c) research students in category (a) or (b).

Students will practice grammatical work to maintain their familiarity with Latin grammar and syntax, but the main emphasis of their studies will be on prepared and unseen translation. Students will follow a graded programme of basic Latin unseen translation and of suitable Latin prose and verse authors for prepared translation.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

Read more

CL671 - The Rise and Fall of Athens

See entry for CL589

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL652 - Gods, Heroes and Mystery Cults: Religion in Ancient Greece

This module is an introduction to ancient Greek religion and Mystery cults. The module will offer an introduction to the major gods and goddesses of ancient Greece, spheres of influence, character, relationships, exploits, and worship. It is concerned with the analysis of religious festivals, cults, beliefs, and the development of religious architecture. The module will additionally briefly contrast Greek religion to Christianity, as an example of investigating how Greek religion differs from, and resembles, modern religions. The materials of the course are drawn from the ancient Greeks themselves —from archaeology, Greek poets, artists, playwrights, mythographers, and philosophers from the 10th–2nd centuries BC.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

Read more

CL627 - Advanced Ancient Greek Language

In this module students will consolidate their knowledge of Greek grammar and syntax through a series of weekly revisions of material covered in Beginner's and Intermediate Greek, with weekly take-home exercises designed to assist in that learning. Students will also read a selection of Greek prose and verse designed to give them the linguistic and research skills necessary to satisfactorily read and understand original texts, making appropriate use of dictionaries and grammar resources. Some time will also be devoted to analysis of the content of the texts being read.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL634 - Hellenistic Literature and Culture

In this module students will examine the literature and culture of the period of Hellenistic kingdoms following the death of Alexander of Macedon, with a strong focus on the role of the libraries that developed in the Hellenistic kingdoms and the changes to Greek material culture that arise from the contact with Near Eastern cultures. There will also be discussion of developments in religion and philosophy in that period and its impact on literature and culture and on Roman society.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL636 - Archaeological Project

Students selecting this module have an opportunity to pursue a project involving the study and analysis of a body of archaeological data. The module will be based on individual scholarship and research supplemented by group guidance seminars and one-to-one supervisions. The project theme will be chosen by the student with the advice of the tutor. In terms of the primary data it could involve investigation of antiquarian literature, archive documentation including cartographic sources, Historic Environment Records, museum collections, observation of monuments in the field, or participation in approved fieldwork or excavation. Choice of project will be informed by a student’s personal interests, the fulfilment of the aims of the module, the availability of expert supervision, and the accessibility and suitability of data. The module is especially appropriate for students attending one of the University of Kent's sponsored field projects, perhaps via a bursary. The module is designed for students who wish to develop skills in research and work with some independence. The project is especially suited to those who have vocational interests in archaeology, heritage or museum studies after they graduate and/or have further research ambitions, perhaps looking towards a Masters degree or a PhD. It is designed to provide students with a grounding for further research, and with some element of contact with original material, whether this be related to a first hand experience on an archaeological excavation or survey, or 'finds' study, work on an excavation archive, other records, etc. If you are going on fieldwork or have access to material from already excavated sites and want to write an article on an aspect of the material culture recovered there, etc., if you want to reassess some material already published or in a Museum or write up your experience of working on a dig or survey this is a means to do so. The project will enable you to develop and express your abilities. You can work fairly independently, arranging your studies in your time within a framework of guidance. We expect that some students will have very regular contact, others will work more freely but see their supervisor at scheduled key times. Staff are here to assist you and it may be that your supervisor will be a member of staff other than the module convenor, as suitable. Staff can facilitate studies but with this project you should take responsibility for management. Success will depend upon enthusiasm, sound topic selection, good planning, and sustained commitment, research and comprehension.

Submission of a draft plan: Friday Week 5; submission of an essay draft or annotated outline: Friday Week 11; final submission date: Friday Week 23

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL641 - Virgil's Aeneid

Virgil composed the Aeneid in order to provide Rome with an epic equal to any that Homer produced. Commonly regarded as one the greatest epics of the Ancient world, the Aeneid is the story of the foundation of Rome; a tale of exile, war, passionate love and the deepest humanity. The first term will be spent analysing, commenting on and exploring the work, book by book. The second term takes a thematic approach, investigating issues concerning the gods, fate, morality, art and gender. The module will also briefly explore the Aeneid’s subsequent influence on Dante’s Inferno.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL609 - Roman Art and Architecture

This module is designed to thoroughly introduce students to a well-studied aspect of Roman archaeology, that of its art and architecture. The module will cover the periods from the first century BC up to late Antiquity, including late Republican, Imperial and late Roman remains. The main areas of focus for the early part of the module will be the city of Rome and Italian sites such as Pompeii and Ostia. Sites in southern France and Spain will also be explored, as a means of questioning the influence of Roman styles in other areas. A multiplicity of types of sites will be examined for understanding Roman building techniques; these will include temples, fora, theatres, amphitheatres and housing. The art of painting, sculpture and mosaic work will be studied in conjunction with the sites. ‘Minor arts’ such as glass, cameos, jewellery, metal work and coins are examined in relation to their historical, spatial and social context. Throughout the module examinations will not only be made into the styles, development and changes to the art and architecture, but questions will be raised about the cultural view of the remains, which is important for understanding the roles the sites and artistic work played in Roman society. Here specific issues of propaganda, mythology, erotica and gender will be discussed. Moreover, the historical events will be explored to see what significance and influence they played on artistic and architectural styles, as well as patronage. Thus, the module will supply students with a thorough grounding in the multiple issues raised in the study of Roman art and architecture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL607 - Greek and Roman Medicine

See entry for CL663

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL582 - Rome: The Imperial Republic

Roman history in this period is dominated by two events: the acquisition by Rome of an overseas empire and the gradual disintegration of the Republican state. Both these developments will be examined in detail. Particular attention is paid to Rome's Diplomatic and military confrontations with the Hellenistic powers of the Eastern Mediterranean and their effect on Roman social, political and intellectual behaviour. The student will read a wide range of ancient sources, from Polybius to Cicero

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL585 - Egypt and the Classical World

This module is concerned with the interaction between two contiguous but very different peoples, Egypt in the Late Period and Classical Greece. Though the Aegean world had a long history of contact with Egypt, the volume of contact increased dramatically under the XXVI (Saïte) Dynasty, with the foundation of commercial settlements, the development of vigorous trade relations and the arrival of many Greeks as traders, mercenaries and tourists. That contact had profound consequences both in the short and longer term. It provided an essential support for the last great dynasty of independent Egypt. It aided the rise of the East Greek cities of Ionia. It influenced the development of Greek sculpture and architecture. Equally important, it revealed to the Greeks a civilization which was deeply impressive, in many ways superior, yet alien. The immediate fruit of that perception lies in the stimulus to Greek thought and history writing, especially through Herodotus (a vital witness to Egyptian religion and society of this age). In the longer term it shaped the way in which the West perceived Egypt, creating myths about its antiquity, its religion and its wisdom which continue to affect us today, not least in the shaping of traditional Egyptology. The module will be taught from a range of sources, archaeological, papyrological, historical and literary.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL588 - Heads, Heroes and Horses in Search of the Ancient Celts

See entry for CL651

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL310 - Greek for Beginners

The aim of the module is to provide students with a firm foundation in the Classical Greek language. The text book used combines grammar and syntax with passages about a farmer and his family living in fifth-century Attica. As the story progresses, we move onto the Peloponnesian war and thus adapted texts of Thucydides. Reading is therefore ensured from the very first lesson. Extracts from the Bible will also be used. The module will follow the structured approach of Athenaze I (OUP).

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL311 - Latin for Beginners

This course introduces Latin to complete, or near, beginners, aiming to cover the basic aspects of grammar required for understanding, reading and translating this ancient language. Using a textbook, in which each chapter focuses on different topics of grammar, the students apply what they have learnt through the translation of sentences adapted from ancient authors. By the end of the course, students should have acquired an adequate foundation for pursuing Latin at intermediate level, in which they can advance to reading complete unadapted texts.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL571 - Early Greece and the Formation of the Classical World

This module is concerned with the history of Greece down to the end of the Persian invasions. Among the subjects examined in detail are the growth of the city-state and its constitution and the impact of colonisation on the Greek world.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL573 - Love and Sex in Roman Society

See entry for CL667

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL550 - Intermediate Greek Language

This module gives an opportunity by a new method devised by Balme and Lawall to study Ancient Greek with a view to acquiring reading knowledge of such classical authors as Homer, Plato and the Greek dramatists, so as to give students a firm foundation in Classical Greek language. The texts used consist of two volumes, (i) grammar and syntax, and (ii) a reading volume of simple extracts based on Aristophanes, Plato and Demosthenes. The two are taken in parallel so that the reading is ensured from the very first lesson, and puts into practice the grammar learnt.

Schedule will follow the structured approach of 'Reading Greek' (CUP), covering: alphabet and pronunciation; present, imperfect, future and aorist tenses of verbs in active, middle and passive voice and in indicative mood; all the cases and all three declensions of the inflected noun; use of prepositions, adjectives, pronouns, conjunctions, imperatives and participles].

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL513 - Intermediate Latin

This module is designed (a) for students who have successfully taken Latin for Beginners (CL311), or (b) for students come to this university with GCSE Latin or an equivalent qualification, or (c) for research students who need support. Thus the Intermediate Latin module will continue the formal instruction in Latin grammar and syntax beyond the level achieved in the Beginners' module and will give students practice both in elementary unseen translation, usually from classical authors, and in the study of classical texts.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL517 - Roman Britain

The module will deal with the history of the province from the time of Caesar's invasion down to the final Roman withdrawal. Attention will be paid to the military, social, economic and cultural aspects of the Roman conquest.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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Teaching & Assessment

All modules have a weekly seminar, and most also have weekly lectures. Archaeology modules sometimes include museum and site visits. We encourage students to take part in excavations and surveys with staff and associated institutions, and student bursaries are available to support this.

Assessment at all stages varies from 100% coursework to a combination of examination and coursework.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • teach a congruent discipline within the framework of European intellectual, cultural and historical traditions, interacting with other component disciplines
  • teach students about the diverse societies and cultures of the Ancient World and their interaction, through literature, history and archaeology
  • provide carefully graded programmes in Classical Studies, Ancient History and Archaeological Studies
  • survey the main areas and genres of Classical Literature, both Greek and Latin
  • study the history of ancient Greece and Rome, and the contemporary civilizations of ancient Asia Minor, Persia and Egypt, from ca. 600BC to ca. AD600
  • examine the archaeology of the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome within the wider context of the Mediterranean, and of the broadly contemporary cultures of temperate Europe, over the period ca. 1000BC to ca. AD600, and to introduce some aspects of earlier prehistory
  • study in depth selected themes, regions and periods in literature, history and archaeology
  • introduce key elements by which early Europe acquired its social, political, cultural and intellectual foundations
  • explore different types of evidence, literary, historical, art and archaeological, using primary source material where possible, focusing on different approaches and techniques
  • examine the problems of interpretation of source material through critical analysis of current studies
  • equip students with a range of subject-based critical thinking and communication skills.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • another culture, focused on literature, thought, art and religion, or history and political and social organisation, or material culture, with an informed sense of the similarities and differences between it and our own culture
  • selected themes, periods and regions within the context of current debate
  • a diverse range of primary materials and the appropriate methods of interpretation.

Intellectual skills

You gain the following intellectual abilities:

  • apply the skills needed for academic study and enquiry
  • analyse, evaluate and interpret a variety of types of evidence in an independent and critical manner
  • select, gather and synthesise relevant information from a wide variety of sources to gain a coherent understanding
  • deploy a range of techniques and methodologies of study
  • utilise problem-solving skills
  • evaluate research in a critical manner
  • study and reach conclusions independently.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in the following:

  • make a critical evaluation of a variety of sources for literary and historical and archaeological study, such as texts and inscriptions
  • extract key elements from complex data, identify and solve associated problems
  • select and apply appropriate methodologies in assessing data, such as bibliographical research, textual analysis, historical analysis, visual skills, collection and analysis of archaeological data, use of statistics, philosophical argument and analysis
  • gather, memorise and deploy evidence and information, and show awareness of the consequences if such evidence is unavailable
  • show familiarity with the basic concepts that underpin the different branches of the programme pathways
  • the ability to present an argument lucidly and communicate interpretations using the appropriate academic conventions.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in the following:

  • the ability to communicate effectively with a wide range of individuals
  • take responsibility for your personal and professional learning and development
  • evaluate and learn from your own academic performance
  • manage time, prioritise workloads and assessments, write and think under pressure
  • utilise problem-solving skills in a variety of theoretical and practical situations
  • work creatively, flexibly and adaptably with others, understand how groups function
  • deploy a range of IT skills effectively, such as producing word-processed text with footnotes, formatting documents, research using databases and locating and exploiting websites.

Careers

Studying on the Classical & Archaeological Studies programme, you gain key transferable skills such as the ability to analyse and summarise complex information, to manage and organise your time, and to express your opinion persuasively and with sensitivity, skills that will leave you well placed to embark on a graduate career.

Possible careers include archaeology, the heritage industry, museums, business, journalism, Civil Service, computing, media, librarianship, teaching, further academic study, general ‘arts degree’ employment requiring literacy and versatility.

For more information on the services Kent provides you to improve your career prospects visit www.kent.ac.uk/employability.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

ABB

Access to HE Diploma

The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The university will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall or 16 at HL

International students

The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
Kent International Foundation Programme

The Kent International Foundation Programme (IFP) can provide progression to this programme. See www.kent.ac.uk/internationalpathways/ifp for details.

English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to support eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our 2015 entry support package has not been finalised. However, our 2014 financial support package included a £6,500 cash bursary. Find out more on our funding page.

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence, which will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our funding pages. Please note that details of the scholarship for 2015 entry have not yet been finalised and are subject to change.

Enquire or order a prospectus

Download a prospectus (PDF - 2MB) or order one below.

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Resources

Download a subject leaflet (pdf)

Our subject leaflets provide more detail about individual subjects areas. See:

Read our student profiles

Open days

Our general open days will give you a flavour of what it is like to be an undergraduate, postgraduate or part-time student at Kent. They include a programme of talks for undergraduate students, with subject lectures and demonstrations, plus self-guided walking tours of the campus and accommodation.

Please check which of our locations offers the courses you are interested in before choosing which event to attend.

Related courses

UNISTATS / KIS

Key Information Sets

The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

Apply

Full-time applicants

Full-time applicants (including international applicants) should apply through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) system. If you need help or advice on your application, you should speak with your careers advisor or contact UCAS Customer Contact Centre. You can also write to UCAS at:

UCAS Customer Contact Centre,
PO Box 28,
Cheltenham
GL52 3LZ

The institution code number of the University of Kent is K24, and the code name is KENT.

Application deadlines

See our UCAS application timeline for information about deadlines and an outline of the UCAS process. 

Part-time applicants

If you need more advice on making an application or choosing your programme, please contact the Recruitment and Admissions Office:

  • T: +44 (0)1227 827272
  • Freephone (UK only): 0800 975 3777
  • or make an online enquiry (click on 'enquire' on the right-hand side).

Part-time students should apply directly to the University. There is no fixed closing date, but you should apply for your programme as early a possible. You can apply online by clicking the link below:

 

Fees

Every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in publicity materials is fair and accurate at the time of going to press. However, the courses, services and other matter covered by web pages and prospectuses are subject to change from time to time and no guarantee can be given that changes will not be made following publication and/or after candidates have been admitted to the University. Please see www.kent.ac.uk/applicants/information/policies/disclaimer for further information. Please note that modules shown are based on the current curriculum but are subject to change.

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The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000