Settling in

Settling in

There's so much on offer, it's easy to start thinking you have to do everything. Before you know it, you’re out every night, your days are busy, and on top of all that, you’re trying to figure out how you fit in. You might find your feet straightaway, but it's OK if you don't. Everyone is different.

What to do if...

You've been here a few weeks. You’re feeling tired and could really do with a night in, but you’re feeling lots of pressure to be ‘making the most of it’, especially after not being able to do anything fun for such a long time. 

If you’re looking for a quieter night, the chances are that others will feel the same. Suggest a film night, play a board game or all cook dinner together. Things will settle down as the term goes on and you’ll find a routine.

If you’re living in uni accommodation, you may also be missing home. Getting used to living with other people can take a while, and it’s absolutely OK to feel that way. Your College Life Officers are there to support you and help you adjust to living independently, so don't be afraid to get in touch with them if you're struggling.

Keep in touch with your family and friends at home to reassure yourself they are OK - maybe FaceTime or call once a week. It may be tempting to go home every weekend, but you should give yourself time to get to know your house/flatmates and the campus as this will help you feel more settled. 

Make sure your room is comfortable and feels like ‘yours’. Bring your duvet and pillows, cushions, photos, a favourite lamps…all of these will make your room more cosy and familiar. There's usually a poster sale in Welcome Week too.

International students

We've developed a module you can complete to help with your transition to studying and living in the UK.

Get to know: Student Support and Wellbeing

Get to know our team, how to contact us if you need to and find out more about how we support all Kent students. We can help with: 

  • mental health
  • counselling
  • disability support
  • long-term health conditions
  • autism support
  • specific learning difficulties
  • accessibility advice
  • funding resources
  • care leaver support
  • sexual assault and harassment
  • support groups, workshops and events
  • free online support
  • emergency support
  • healthcare services.

Quotation

I was scared, because coming to Kent wasn’t my original plan. But it was much better than I anticipated. We had a Welcome Week, and also got introduced to all the lecturers and modules. I soon realised I didn’t need to feel nervous.

Nicola Oginni Sociology and Social Policy BA

Transitions: Helping you navigate university life

Starting uni is exciting, but it can bring challenges. Student Minds, UK’s student mental health charity, have produced a guide which has some great information and advice that may help you throughout your first year. 

  • Academic life: managing workloads, academic resilience
  • Money: reducing financial stress, budgeting tools
  • Mental Health, Stress, Sexual Health 
  • Identity: Learning about yourself as well as your subject
  • Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
  • Relationships: Making healthy and respectful relationships
  • Living situation: Adapting to a new way of life
  • Life Online: Keeping yourself safe electronically