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Professor Darren Griffin

Professor of Genetics,

School of Biosciences

 

Professor Darren Griffin joined the school in 2004 from Brunel University. His main interests are in the study of chromosomes, principally in humans (from spermatogenesis to preimplantation development) and birds. Other interests include allelic variation and its relationship to fatness and studies relating to eLearning. In 2007 he became a BBSRC Career Development Fellow with a remit to exploit microarray technology for studies of copy number variation in birds and humans.

cisor_logoDarren is a member of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of Reproduction (CISoR)

He also regularly coordinates the International Chromosome Conferences.

The Pig Breeders Round Table this year will be held 22-23 April 2015 in Keynes College, University of Kent.

Research Career

2008 Doctor of Science, University of Manchester

2007 Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists

2007 BBSRC Career Development Fellow

2004 Vice President of the International Chromosome and Genome Society

2002 Postgraduate Certificate, Teaching and Learning in HE, Brunel University.

2002 Fellow of the Institute of Biology.

2001 Editorial Board 'Prenatal Diagnosis'.

1992 Doctor of Philosophy, Human Genetics, University College London.

1988 Bachelor of Science (with honours), Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Manchester.

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Also view these in the Kent Academic Repository

Article
Fowler, K. et al. (2018). The production of pig preimplantation embryos in vitro: Current progress and future prospects. Reproductive Biology [Online] 18:203-211. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.repbio.2018.07.001.
Griffin, D. et al. (2018). Jurassic spark: Mapping the genomes of birds and other dinosaurs Galkina, S. and Vishnevskaya, M. eds. Comparative Cytogenetics [Online] 12:322-323, Abstract L13. Available at: https://doi.org/10.3897/CompCytogen.v12i3.27748.
Parks, J. et al. (2018). The impact of infertility diagnosis on embryo-endometrial dialogue. Reproduction [Online] 155:543-552. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1530/REP-17-0566.
Griffin, D. and Ogur, C. (2018). Chromosomal analysis in IVF: just how useful is it? Reproduction [Online] 156:F29-F50. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1530/REP-17-0683.
Damas, J. et al. (2018). Reconstruction of avian ancestral karyotypes reveals differences in the evolutionary history of macro- and microchromosomes. Genome Biology [Online] 19. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13059-018-1544-8.
O'Connor, R. et al. (2018). Reconstruction of the diapsid ancestral genome permits chromosome evolution tracing in avian and non-avian dinosaurs. Nature Communications [Online] 9. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-04267-9.
Caujolle, S. et al. (2017). Speckle variance OCT for depth resolved assessment of the viability of bovine embryos. Biomedical Optics Express [Online] 8:5139-5150. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/BOE.8.005139.
Gould, R. and Griffin, D. (2017). Karyomapping and how is it improving preimplantation genetics? Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics [Online]. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/14737159.2017.1325736.
Griffin, D. et al. (2017). Continuing to deliver: the evidence base for pre-implantation genetic screening. BMJ [Online] 356:j752. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j752.
Saintas, E. et al. (2017). Acquired resistance to oxaliplatin is not directly associated with increased resistance to DNA damage in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000, a newly established oxaliplatin-resistant sub-line of the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS. PLoS ONE [Online] 12:e0172140. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0172140.
Saretzki, G. et al. (2017). Preterm infants have significantly longer telomeres than their term born counterparts. PLOS ONE [Online] 12:e0180082. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180082.
O'Connor, R. et al. (2017). Isolation of subtelomeric sequences of porcine chromosomes for translocation screening reveals errors in the pig genome assembly. Animal Genetics [Online] 48:395-403. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/age.12548.
McCallie, B. et al. (2017). Infertility diagnosis has a significant impact on the transcriptome of developing blastocysts. Molecular Human Reproduction [Online] 23:549-556. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1093/molehr/gax034.
Sanders, K. and Griffin, D. (2017). Chromosomal Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: 25 Years and Counting. Journal of Fetal Medicine [Online] 4:51-56. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40556-017-0123-5.
Griffin, D. (2017). What is Karyomapping and where does it fit in the world of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)? Medical Research Archives [Online] 5. Available at: http://journals.ke-i.org/index.php/mra/article/view/1256.
Ioannou, D. et al. (2016). Impact of sperm DNA chromatin in the clinic. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics [Online] 33:157-166. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-015-0624-x.
Al Dibouni, Z. et al. (2016). Incidence, Sex Ratio and Perinatal Outcomes of IVF and ICSI Monozygotic Twin Pregnancies Following either Cleavage or Blastocyst Stage Embryo Transfer. Human Genetics & Embryology [Online] 6. Available at: http://www.dx.doi.org/10.4172/2161-0436.1000132.
Damas, J. et al. (2016). Upgrading short read animal genome assemblies to chromosome level using comparative genomics and a universal probe set. Genome Research [Online] 27:875-884. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gr.213660.116.
Coates, A. et al. (2016). Differences in pregnancy outcomes in donor egg frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles following preimplantation genetic screening (PGS): a single center retrospective study. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics [Online] 34:71-78. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-016-0832-z.
Hornak, M. et al. (2016). Aneuploidy Detection and mtDNA Quantification in Bovine Embryos with Different Cleavage Onset Using a Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Protocol. Cytogenetic and Genome Research [Online] 150:60-67. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1159/000452923.
Wrenzycki, C. et al. (2016). Hypomethylation and Genetic Instability in Monosomy Blastocysts May Contribute to Decreased Implantation Potential. PLOS ONE [Online] 11:e0159507. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159507.
Capalbo, A. et al. (2016). Artificial oocyte activation with calcium ionophore does not cause a widespread increase in chromosome segregation errors in the second meiotic division of the oocyte. Fertility and Sterility [Online] 105:807-814.e2. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2015.11.017.
Farré, M. et al. (2016). Novel Insights into Chromosome Evolution in Birds, Archosaurs, and Reptiles. Genome Biology and Evolution [Online] 8:2442-2451. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1093/gbe/evw166.
Turner, K. et al. (2016). Multicolor detection of every chromosome as a means of detecting mosaicism and nuclear organization in human embryonic nuclei. Panminerva medica [Online] 58:175-90. Available at: https://www.minervamedica.it/it/riviste/panminerva-medica/articolo.php?cod=R41Y2016N02A0175.
Victor, A. et al. (2016). Accurate quantitation of mitochondrial DNA reveals uniform levels in human blastocysts irrespective of ploidy, age, or implantation potential. Fertility and Sterility [Online] 107:34-42. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2016.09.028.
Taylor, T. et al. (2016). Technique to 'Map' Chromosomal Mosaicism at the Blastocyst Stage. Cytogenetic and Genome Research [Online] 149:262-266. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1159/000449051.
Parks, J. et al. (2016). Corona cell RNA sequencing from individual oocytes revealed transcripts and pathways linked to euploid oocyte competence and live birth. Reproductive BioMedicine Online [Online] 32:518-526. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.rbmo.2016.02.002.
O'Connor, R. et al. (2016). Upgrading molecular cytogenetics to study reproduction and reproductive isolation in mammals, birds, and dinosaurs. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 148:151-152, Abstract VII.13.
O'Connor, R. et al. (2016). Gross genome evolution in the Dinosauria Griffin, D. K. et al. eds. Chromosome Research [Online] 24:S36-S37, Abstract O19. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10577-016-9532-x.
Ottolini, C. et al. (2015). Karyomapping identifies second polar body DNA persisting to the blastocyst stage: implications for embryo biopsy. Reproductive BioMedicine Online [Online] 31:776-782. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.rbmo.2015.07.005.
Romanov, M. et al. (2015). Avian ancestral karyotype reconstruction and differential rates of inter- and intrachromosomal change in different lineages Griffin, D. K. et al. eds. Chromosome Research [Online] 23:414, Abstract P63. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10577-014-9447-3.
Romanov, M. and Griffin, D. (2015). The use of avian BAC libraries and clones, in: Third Report on Chicken Genes and Chromosomes 2015 Schmid, M., Smith, J. and Burt, D. W. eds. Cytogenetic and Genome Research [Online] 145:94-96. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000430927.
Damas, J. et al. (2015). Towards the construction of avian chromosome assemblies Griffin, D. K. et al. eds. Chromosome Research [Online] 23:378-379, Abstract O21. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10577-014-9447-3.
Schmid, M. et al. (2015). Third Report on Chicken Genes and Chromosomes 2015 Schmid, M., Smith, J. and Burt, D. W. eds. Cytogenetic and Genome Research [Online] 145:78-179. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000430927.
Coates, A. et al. (2015). Use of suboptimal sperm increases the risk of aneuploidy of the sex chromosomes in preimplantation blastocyst embryos. Fertility and Sterility [Online] 104:866-872. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2015.06.033.
Thornhill, A. et al. (2015). Karyomapping—a comprehensive means of simultaneous monogenic and cytogenetic PGD: comparison with standard approaches in real time for Marfan syndrome. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics [Online] 32:347-356. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10815-014-0405-y.
Griffin, D. et al. (2015). Avian chromonomics goes functional Griffin, D. K. et al. eds. Chromosome Research [Online] 23:367, Abstract S32. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10577-014-9447-3.
Griffin, D. et al. (2015). Avian cytogenetics goes functional, in: Third Report on Chicken Genes and Chromosomes 2015 Schmid, M., Smith, J. and Burt, D. W. eds. Cytogenetic and Genome Research [Online] 145:100-105. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000430927.
Ottolini, C. et al. (2015). Genome-wide maps of recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes and embryos show selection for maternal recombination rates. Nature Genetics [Online] 47:727-735. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1038/ng.3306.
O'Connor, R. et al. (2015). Reconstruction of the putative Saurian karyotype and the hypothetical chromosome rearrangements that occurred along the Dinosaur lineage Griffin, D. K. et al. eds. Chromosome Research [Online] 23:379-380, Abstract O22. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10577-014-9447-3.
Zhang, G. et al. (2014). Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation. Science [Online] 346:1311-1320. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1251385.
Taylor, T. et al. (2014). Blastocyst euploidy and implantation rates in a young (<35 years) and old (≥35 years) presumed fertile and infertile patient population. Fertility and Sterility [Online]. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.07.1207.
Romanov, M. et al. (2014). Reconstruction of gross avian genome structure, organization and evolution suggests that the chicken lineage most closely resembles the dinosaur avian ancestor. BMC Genomics [Online] 15:1060. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-15-1060.
Nishida, C. et al. (2014). Dynamic Chromosome Reorganization in the Osprey (Pandion haliaetus, Pandionidae, Falconiformes): Relationship between Chromosome Size and the Chromosomal Distribution of Centromeric Repetitive DNA Sequences. Cytogenetic and Genome Research [Online]:179-189. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000358407.
Book section
Griffin, D. and Ellis, P. (2018). The Human Y-chromosome: Evolutionary Directions and Implications for the Future of "Maleness". in: Palermo, G. D. and Sills, E. S. eds. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection. Springer, pp. 183-192. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70497-5_13.
Thornhill, A. et al. (2014). Aneuploidy testing by array-CGH: Applications in preimplantation testing. in: Montag, M. ed. A Practical Guide to Selecting Gametes and Embryos. CRC Press. Available at: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781842145470.
Conference or workshop item
Caujolle, S. et al. (2018). Assessing embryo development using swept source optical coherence tomography. in: Podoleanu, A. G. H. and Bang, O. eds. Second Canterbury Conference on Optical Coherence Tomography, 2017, Canterbury, United Kingdom. SPIE, p. . Available at: https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2282912.
Romanov, M. et al. (2015). Comparative cytogenomics enhanced with bioinformatic tools provides further insights into genome evolution of birds and other amniotes. in: 2nd Annual Food, Nutrition and Agriculture Genomics Congress. London, UK: Oxford Global Conferences Ltd, p. Abstract 5. Available at: http://www.foodgenomics-congress.com/.
Martell, H. et al. (2015). Assembling and comparing avian genomes by molecular cytogenetics. in: 2nd Bioinformatics Student Symposium. The Genome Analysis Centre, Norwich, UK: International Society of Computational Biology - Student Council - Regional Student Group UK; The Genome Analysis Centre, Norwich, UK. Available at: https://www.iscb.org/cms_addon/conferences/ismb2016/posterlist.php?cat=B.
O'Connor, R. et al. (2014). Reconstruction of the putative Saurian karyotype and the hypothetical chromosome rearrangements that occurred along the Dinosaur lineage. in: 20th International Chromosome Conference. Canterbury, Kent, UK: International Chromosome and Genome Society; University of Kent, p. 70, Abstract O22.
Griffin, D. et al. (2014). Avian cytogenetics goes functional. in: 2014 Meeting on Avian Model Systems. Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, p. . Available at: http://meetings.cshl.edu/abstracts/2014/avian2014_absstat.html.
Damas, J. et al. (2014). Towards the construction of avian chromosome assemblies. in: 20th International Chromosome Conference. Canterbury, Kent, UK: International Chromosome and Genome Society; University of Kent, p. 69, Abstract O21.
Griffin, D. et al. (2014). Avian chromonomics goes functional. in: 20th International Chromosome Conference. Canterbury, Kent, UK: International Chromosome and Genome Society; University of Kent, p. 48, Abstract S32. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/bio/icc/programme.html.
Showing 53 of 143 total publications in KAR. [See all in KAR]

 

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three colour FISH on human sperm

Figure: Three colour FISH on human sperm. X chromosome (yellow), Y chromosome (green), chromosome 21 (red). Three sperm in this field of view are XY disomic.

Chromosome Segregation in Human Sperm and Preimplantation Embryos

It is now well established that men with severely compromised semen parameters can have increased levels of aneuploidy in their sperm. We are interested in fundamental investigations into this phenomenon, in particular, the role of genetic recombination and changes in genome organisation.

Through deeper understanding this we aim to better comprehend the causes of male fertility and the mechanisms of chromosome non-disjunction. We have evidence of the efficacy of Chinese Herbal Medicine in decreasing high aneuploidy rates in infertile men and for anti-oestrogenic properties in the medicinal herbs. Work has recently re-visited examination of the human preimplanatation embryo with research into the degree to which aneuploidy is transmitted from sperm to embryo and the role of genome organization in preimplantation development. We have close links with the London Bridge Fertility Clinic and Bridge Genoma.

Current Projects:

Comparative Genomics of Avian Species

The ability to distinguish each chicken chromosome has a number of applications in comparative genomics, developmental biology, molecular ecology, genome organization, and agriculture. We have developed resources that enable us to identify all chicken chromosomes individually. Work has now progressed to generating cytogenetic maps in a range of avian species and studying the role of chromosome evolution in birds

 

Figure A: colour painting of chicken macrochromosomomes.

Figure B: Dual colour chromosome painting of 2 smallest chicken chromosomes (chromosomes 37 and 38)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The spin off activity FARMACHROM has arisen from this work, which provides resources to a range of international collaborators.

In both the above we are now investigating the role of microarray technology for the determination of copy number variation thanks to a recently awarded Career Development Fellowship

 

Computer-Based Learning

Our newest research interest is in the generation, evaluation and dissemination of computer-based learning tools in genetics, cytogenetics and human reproduction. In 2002 we launched "Learning Interactive" a University spin off activity specializing in production, dissemination and sale of these computer-based learning materials.

 

 

 

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PostDocs

PhD students:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Enquiries: Phone: +44 (0)1227 823743

School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NJ

Last Updated: 27/04/2017