School of Psychology

Experience Excellence Studying People


Dr David Wilkinson

Reader in Psychology and Deputy Head of School
Director, NIHR Research Design Service South East

David Wilkinson

Research

Research interests

My main research interest is in understanding the psychological and biological bases of human cognition with a view to developing more effective therapies for individuals with brain injury. My research uses a variety of experimental approaches including normative behavioural testing, cognitive neuropsychology, brain stimulation, and neurophysiological measurement. Current research questions include:

  1. What is the nature of impairment in hemi-spatial neglect, prosopagnosia, and other perceptual disorders?
  2. To what extent do signals from the vestibular system influence how we process incoming visual information?
  3. Can certain aspects of cognition be enhanced via galvanic/caloric vestibular stimulation?

I would welcome students who wish to conduct research in these areas.

Follow the links below to find out more about the psychological interventions on which I am currently working:

Key publications

  • Wilkinson, D.T., Sakel, M., Camp, S.-J. et al. (2012). Patients with hemi-spatial neglect are more prone to limb spasticity, but this does not prolong their hospital stay. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (in press).
  • Wilkinson, D., Guinote, A., Weick, M., Molinari, R., & Graham, K. (2010). Feeling socially powerless makes you more prone to bumping into things on the right and induces leftward line bisection error. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 17, 910-914.
  • Wilkinson, D., Ko, Wiriadjaja, A., Kilduff, P., McGlinchey, R., & Milberg, W.P. (2009). Unilateral damage to the right cerebral hemisphere disrupts the apprehension of whole faces and their component parts. Neuropsychologia, 47, 1701-11.
  • Wilkinson, D.T., Ko, P., McGlinchey, G. et al. (2008). Impaired search for orientation but not color in hemi-spatial neglect. Cortex, 44, 68-78.

 

 

School of Psychology - Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP

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Last Updated: 28/11/2014