Portrait of Dr Stefan Goebel

Dr Stefan Goebel

Reader
Director of the Centre for the History of War, Media and Society

About

Stefan Goebel works in the field of modern British and German cultural and comparative history. Prior to taking up his post at Kent, he was a Junior Research Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge and Leverhulme Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research, London.

Research interests

Dr Goebel’s research focuses on the experience and memory of the two world wars and on urban history. His first book The Great War and Medieval Memory (Cambridge University Press, 2007) is a comparative study of war and remembrance in Britain and Germany between 1914 and 1940. A convenor of the Capital Cities at War project (Cambridge University Press, 2007), Stefan Goebel is also the co-editor of Cities into Battlefields: Metropolitan Scenarios, Experiences and Commemorations of Total War (Ashgate/Routledge, 2011) and of a special issue of the London Journal 41:3 (2016). Together with Mark Connelly, he has written a study of Ypres in the twentieth century (Oxford University Press, 2017). His latest publication is a co-edited volume on Propaganda and Conflict (Bloomsbury, 2019). He is currently completing a comparative history of Coventry and Dresden in the aftermath of the Second World War.

Teaching

At undergraduate level, Stefan offers courses on the comparative history of the Great War and on the legacy of the Second World War. He is the convenor of the MA in War, Media and Society and teaches a course on war, propaganda and the media.

Supervision

Stefan has supervised PhD theses on the media history of the Great War and the cultural history of the Second World War, and he would be glad to hear from prospective research students interested in the history of war commemoration or the urban history of modern conflicts.  

Publications

Showing 50 of 64 total publications in the Kent Academic Repository. View all publications.

Article

  • Bildhauer, B., Goebel, S., Laube, S., Marchand, S. and Swenson, A. (2016). Historicism. German History [Online] 34:646-671. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1093/gerhis/ghw031.
    Forum discussion
  • Goebel, S. and White, J. (2016). London and the First World War. The London Journal [Online] 41:199-218. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/03058034.2016.1216758.
    This article outlines the relationship between London and the First World War. The metropolitan dimension of total war is an emerging field of research at the intersection of military history and urban studies. The article (and special issue) aims to set out an agenda for historians of war/the city. While it is true that what happened at the ‘home front’ generally occurred in the capital city too, the London experience of the Great War was in many respects distinctive. The nerve centre of both the national and imperial war effort, the metropolis was the site of heightened anticipation, dense experience and concentrated commemoration. For London, the First World War proved an accelerator and incubator of socio-cultural change. Even so, London's stability vis-à-vis other imperial capitals was remarkable. The true impact of the war and its legacy can only be gauged by contrasting it with the state of London around 1914.
  • Goebel, S. (2014). Commemorative Cityscapes: The Lasting Imprint of the First World War on Urban Space. Context: The Journal of the Institute of Historic Building Conservation [Online]:31-32. Available at: http://ihbconline.co.uk/context/137/#32.

Book

  • Connelly, M. and Goebel, S. (2018). Ypres. [Online]. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Available at: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/ypres-9780198713371?cc=gb&lang=en&.
  • Connelly, M. and Goebel, S. (2018). Ypres. [Online]. Oxford University Press. Available at: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/ypres-9780198713371?cc=gb&lang=en&.
    The following is the book jacket text written by Mark Connelly: In 1914 Ypres was a sleepy Belgian city admired for its magnificent Gothic architecture. The arrival of the rival armies in October 1914 transformed it into a place known across the world with each combatant ascribing the place with a set of values and images. It is now at the hub of First World War battlefield tourism with much of its economy devoted to serving the needs and interests of people from across the world. The surrounding countryside is dominated by memorials, cemeteries and museums many of which were erected in the 1920s and 1930s, but are being added to constantly as fascination with the region increases. This work explores the ways in which Ypres has been understood and interpreted by Britain and the Commonwealth, Belgium, France and Germany, including the variants developed by the Nazis, looking at the way in which different groups have struggled to impose their own narratives on the city and the region around it. It explores the city’s growth as a tourist destination and examines the sometimes tricky relationship visitors had with local people as well as the behaviour of the visitors themselves who hovered between being respectful pilgrims and tourists intent on being shocked, thrilled and excited. The result of new and extensive archival research across a number of countries, this book offers an innovative overview of the development of a critical site of Great War memory.

Book section

  • Connelly, M., Fox, J., Schmidt, U. and Goebel, S. (2019). Power and persuasion: Propaganda into the twenty-first century. In: Connelly, M. L., Fox, J., Schmidt, U. and Goebel, S. P. eds. Propaganda and Conflict: War, Media and Shaping the Twentieth Century. Bloomsbury Academic. Available at: https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/propaganda-and-conflict-9781788314039/.
  • Farley, J. (2019). From Civil War to Cold War: The Model Worker in Chinese film propaganda. In: Schmidt, U., Connelly, M. L., Goebel, S. P. and Fox, J. eds. Propaganda and Conflict: War, Media and Shaping the Twentieth Century. Bloomsbury, pp. 253-269. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.5040/9781788316736.ch-012.
  • Connelly, M., Fox, J., Schmidt, U. and Goebel, S. (2019). Introduction [part I to III]. In: Connelly, M. L., Fox, J., Schmidt, U. and Goebel, S. P. eds. Propaganda and Conflict: War, Media and Shaping the Twentieth Century. Bloomsbury Academic. Available at: https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/propaganda-and-conflict-9781788314039/.
  • Anderson, J. (2019). The Undefeated: Propaganda, rehabilitation and post-war Britain. In: Connelly, M. L., Fox, J., Goebel, S. and Schmidt, U. eds. Propaganda and Conflict: War, Media and Shaping the Twentieth Century. Bloomsbury, pp. 209-229. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.5040/9781788316736.ch-010.
    Julie Anderson In 1950, newspapers announced the release of the film The Undefeated, a documentary which focussed on the state’s support for disabled ex-servicemen. Commissioned by the Ministry of Pensions and produced by the Central Office of Information (COI) , the film centred on a pilot who became disabled as a result of injuries sustained in a wartime glider accident. The film follows ‘Joe Anderson’s’ journey from hospital to workplace through the rehabilitation process, highlighting the Ministry of Pensions’ work and the state’s responsibility to its war wounded. This chapter explores post-war British propaganda in film and focusses on The Undefeated to examine the series of relationships between the state, the public and information programmes. Starting with the seminal work of David Welch, historians have explored war and film propaganda during the Second World War, demonstrating that the relationship between propaganda and the state was often highly complex. Welch observes...
  • Goebel, S. (2017). Catturare la guerra: Fotografi dilettanti sul fronte occidentale. In: Amato, P., Gorgone, S. and Miglino, G. eds. Rappresentare l’irrappresentabile: La Grande Guerra E La Crisi dell’esperienza. Marsilio, pp. 127-139.
  • Goebel, S. (2017). Foreword. In: Posman, S., Van Dijck, C. and Demoor, M. eds. The Intellectual Response to the First World War: How the Conflict Impacted on Ideas, Methods and Fields of Enquiry. Sussex Academic Press, p. viii-x.
  • Goebel, S. (2016). The German Crusade: The Battle of Tannenberg 1410 and 1914. In: Stevenson, K. and Gribling, B. eds. Chivalry and the Medieval Past. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell & Brewer, pp. 169-186. Available at: https://boydellandbrewer.com/chivalry-and-the-medieval-past-hb.html.
  • Goebel, S. (2016). Societies at War, 1914–1918. In: Doumanis, N. ed. The Oxford Handbook of Europe, 1914–1945. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 41-60.
  • Goebel, S. (2016). “The spirit of the crusaders”: Scottish peculiarities, British commonalities and European convergences in the memorialization of the Great War. In: Plain, G. ed. Scotland and the First World War: Myth, Memory, and the Legacy of Bannockburn. Bucknell University Press, pp. 125-141. Available at: https://www.bucknell.edu/script/upress/book.asp?id=3841.
  • Goebel, S. (2014). Cities. In: Winter, J. ed. The Cambridge History of the First World War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 358-381.
  • Goebel, S. (2014). Villes. In: Becker, A. and Winter, J. eds. La Première Guerre Mondiale. Paris: Fayard, pp. 399-423.
  • Goebel, S. (2014). "Intimate Pictures": British War Photography from the Western Front. In: Jakob, V. and Sagurna, S. eds. Front 14/18: The Great War in 3D / Der Erste Weltkrieg in 3D / De Groote Oorlog in 3D. Münster / Steinfurt: LWL-Medienzentrum für Westfalen / Tecklenborg Verlag, pp. 42-55.
  • Goebel, S. (2014). Der “Eiserne Schmied von Hagen”: Kriegspropaganda – Kunststreit – kulturelles Gedächtnis. In: Blank, R., Belgin, T. and Schulte, B. eds. Weltenbrand: Hagen 1914. Essen: Klartext, pp. 139-150.
  • Goebel, S. (2014).Aus der Mitte der Gesellschaft: Propaganda und Gedenken mit “Kriegswahreichen zum Benageln.” In: Eilers, S. ed. An Der ‘Heimatfront’: Westfalen Und Lippe Im Ersten Weltkrieg. Münster, Germany: LWL-Museumsamt für Westfalen, pp. 106-123.
  • Goebel, S. (2012). Cultural memory and the Great War: classicism and medievalism in British and German war memorials. In: Rhodes, P., Low, P. and Oliver, G. eds. Cultures of Commemoration: War Memorials, Ancient and Modern. British Academy and Oxford University Press, pp. 131-154.
  • Goebel, S. (2012). Brüchige Kontinuität: Kriegerdenkmäler und Kriegsgedenken im 20. Jahrhundert: Großbritannien. In: Hettling, M. and Echternkamp, J. eds. Gefallenengedenken Im Globalen Vergleich: Nationale Tradition, Politische Legitimation Und Individualisierung Der Erinnerung. R. Oldenbourg, pp. 201-226.
  • Goebel, S. (2012). Une cosmopolis commémorative: les réseaux de commémoration transnationaux à Coventry après la Seconde Guerre mondiale. In: Choné, A. ed. Villes Invisibles Et écritures De La Modernité. Paris: Orizons, pp. 111-133.
  • Goebel, S. (2012). Britain’s “Last Crusade”: From War Propaganda to War Commemoration, c. 1914–1930. In: Welch, D. and Fox, J. eds. Justifying War: Propaganda, Politics and the Modern Age. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 159-176.
  • Goebel, S. (2011). Commemorative cosmopolis: transnational networks of remembrance in post-war Coventry. In: Goebel, S. P. and Keene, D. eds. Cities into Battlefields: Metropolitan Scenarios, Experiences and Commemorations of Total War. Aldershot: Ashgate, pp. 163-183.
  • Goebel, S. and Keene, D. (2011). Towards a metropolitan history of total war: an introduction. In: Goebel, S. P. and Keene, D. eds. Cities into Battlefields: Metropolitan Scenarios, Experiences and Commemorations of Total War. Aldershot: Ashgate, pp. 1-46.
  • Goebel, S. (2010). Chivalrous knights versus iron warriors: representations of the battle of matériel and slaughter in Britain and Germany, 1914-1940. In: James, P. ed. Picture This: World War I Posters and Visual Culture. University of Nebraska Press, pp. 79-110.
  • Connelly, M. and Goebel, S. (2009). Zwischen Erinnerungspolitik und Erinnerungskonsum: Der Luftkrieg in Großbritannien. In: Arnold, J., Süß, D. and Thießen, M. eds. Luftkrieg: Erinnerungen in Deutschland Und Europa. Göttingen: Wallstein, pp. 50-65.

Edited book

  • Connelly, M., Schmidt, U. and Goebel, S. (2019). Propaganda and Conflict: War, Media and Shaping the Twentieth Century. [Online]. Connelly, M. L., Fox, J., Schmidt, U. and Goebel, S. P. eds. Bloomsbury Academic. Available at: https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/propaganda-and-conflict-9781788314039/.
  • Goebel, S. (2011). Cities into Battlefields: Metropolitan Scenarios, Experiences and Commemorations of Total War. Goebel, S. P. and Keene, D. eds. Farnham and Burlington, VT: Ashgate.

Edited journal

  • Goebel, S. and White, J. eds. (2016). The London Journal. Special issue: London and the First World War. The London Journal [Online] 41. Available at: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/yldn20/41/3.

Internet publication

  • Goebel, S. (2014). Book Review Of: In Eiserner Zeit: Kriegswahrzeichen Im Ersten Weltkrieg: Ein Katalog by Schneider, Gerhard [Reviews in History, no. 1624]. Available at: http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1624.
  • Goebel, S. (2013). Book Review Of: The Good Fight: Battle of Britain Propaganda and the Few by Campion, Garry [Francia-Recensio, no. 2]. Available at: http://www.perspectivia.net/content/publikationen/francia/francia-recensio/2013-2/ZG/campion_goebel.

Review

  • Goebel, S. (2019). Book Review. The American Historical Review [Online] 124:770-771. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1093/ahr/rhz109​.
  • Goebel, S. (2017). Book Review. Historische Zeitschrift [Online] 304:862-864. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1515/hzhz-2017-1253.
    Review of: Frederick Taylor, Coventry. Der Luftangriff vom 14. November 1940: Wendepunkt im Zweiten Weltkrieg. Aus dem Engl. v. Helmut Dierlamm u. Hans Freundl. München, Siedler 2015
  • Goebel, S. (2016). Book Review. European History Quarterly [Online] 46:349-352. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1177/0265691416637313n.
    Reviews of: Anne Fuchs, After the Dresden Bombing: Pathways of Memory, 1945 to the Present; Tony Joel, The Dresden Firebombing: Memory and the Politics of Commemorating Destruction
  • Goebel, S. (2014). Book Review. German Studies Review 34:454-455.
  • Goebel, S. (2014). Book Review. History [Online] 99:908-909. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-229X.12091_22.
    Review of: Living on the Western Front: Annals and Stories, 1914-1919. By Chris Ward. Bloomsbury. 2013. vi + 290pp. £22.99.
  • Goebel, S. (2013). Book Review. Speculum 88:565-566.
  • Goebel, S. (2013). Book Review. American Historical Review 118:605.
  • Goebel, S. (2012). Book Review. Bulletin of the German Historical Institute London 34:27-31.
  • Goebel, S. (2011). Book Review. German Politics 20:316-317.
  • Goebel, S. (2011). Book Review. Central European History 44:587-589.
  • Goebel, S. (2011). Book Review. Classical Review 61:627-629.
  • Goebel, S. (2010). Book Review. Journal of Contemporary History 45:877-879.
  • Goebel, S. (2010). Book Review. English Historical Review 125:1037-1039.
  • Goebel, S. (2010). Book Review. Journal of Military History 74:254-255.
  • Goebel, S. (2009). Book Review. Central European History 42:159-161.

Thesis

  • Pratley, T. (2017). The Supermarine Spitfire: Palimpsest, Performance, and Myth.
    Modern scholarship understands myth to be neither fact nor fiction, only what is believed, and what is believed is subject to change. In order for the British war made myths of 1940 to prove sustainable post-war, they had to prove adaptable; they had to have the capability to evolve. Fortunately it is in the nature of myth to be both synchronic, transcending time, and diachronic, evolving through time. This study is an enquiry into how the Spitfire in performance has been one agent of the evolution of the war-made myth. Beginning in the 1950s, a new generation of adolescent boys wanted to experience the Battle of Britain as an imaginary playground. The Spitfire helped them to achieve this. By the late 1980s, those adolescent boys had grown up and had families of their own. A new generation wanted to know what the Battle of Britain had to say about nationality and collective identity. The Spitfire answered these questions too. It was able to answer these questions because almost from the day of its public debut, it has had the chameleon like facility of a palimpsest. The Spitfire has made an important contribution to the evolution of the war-made myth of the Battle of Britain, an evolution that has guaranteed the myth's cultural relevance post-war.
  • Gregory, P. (2016). The Funny Side of War: British Cartoons, Visual Humour and the Great War.
    This thesis examines cartoons and the humour they express throughout the Great War of 1914-1918. Its aim is to highlight the relevance of visual material in an historical context, to draw upon humour as an insight to cultural moods and attitudes in wartime, and to bring an interdisciplinary approach to the cultural history of the Great War. To do this it will highlight the humour of different British cartoonists in selected newspapers and publications throughout the war and beyond. Primarily it will take a thematic and qualitative approach to visual topics expressed in cartoons analysing their connections to the rest of wartime society. Visual interpretations of public controls, entertainment, avoidance of social duty and comparisons between soldier and civilian responses to the war will be analysed. All of which will look to the use of humour in society relating to these topics in the context of war. Thereafter, the thesis will combine these themes into a formation of memory termed 'commercial' reflecting images and in turn memories sold to the public through cartoons.
    The thesis crosses areas of historical inquiry generating a new dialogue with the cultural history of the Great War, developing ideas of humour, media studies and visual source investigation. War, humour and newspapers are consistent points of reference throughout, combined with a broader historiography as appropriate. Cartoon sources provide the visual basis of the investigation, alongside news articles and reference to official data where applicable. Overall, the interdisciplinary dialogue created between the historiographies of war, humour and visual media promote developing historical investigations, newly bound together in an understanding of the commercial memory of humorous wartime cartoons.

Forthcoming

  • Connelly, M. and Goebel, S. (2019). The Imperial War Graves Commission, the war dead and the burial of a royal body, 1914–32. Historical Research.
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