Portrait of Dr Rory Loughnane

Dr Rory Loughnane

Senior Lecturer in Early Modern Studies

About

Rory Loughnane is Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in Early Modern Studies in the School of English at The University of Kent. He is an award-winning scholar of early modern textual studies, authorship, intellectual history, and literary criticism. 

Dr Loughnane is an Associate Editor of The New Oxford Shakespeare (Oxford University Press, 2016-17), editing ten plays and co-editing another for the new edition. Plays he has edited include 2 Henry VI, Edward III, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Henry V, All’s Well that Ends Well, Pericles, Cymbeline, The Tempest, and The Two Noble Kinsmen. For the Authorship Companion to the edition, he co-authored with Gary Taylor a book-length study about ‘The Canon and Chronology of Shakespeare’s works’ and, in a series of attribution studies, first identified Thomas Middleton as adapter of All’s Well that Ends Well. He is currently editing The Spanish Tragedy and Troilus and Cressida (Q1) and co-editing Othello (Q1) for the Alternative Versions volume, forthcoming with Oxford University Press in 2021. In 2017 he was awarded the Faculty of Humanities Prize for Starting Research for his contribution to The New Oxford Shakespeare edition.
He has published extensively across several fields in early modern studies, including six essay collections and the landmark critical anthology The Memory Arts in Renaissance England (Cambridge University Press, 2016). His essay collections include Late Shakespeare, 1608-1613 (Cambridge University Press, 2013; re-issued 2015), Celtic Shakespeare: The Bard and the Borderers (Ashgate, 2013; re-issued 2017), Staged Transgression in Shakespeare’s England (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) and Staged Normality in Shakespeare’s England (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019). He publishes regularly in academic journals such as The Review of English Studies, The Yearbook of English Studies, Critical Survey, and Shakespeare Studies and has contributed to major studies such as A Feminist Companion to Shakespeare (2016), The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Tragedy (2016), and The Routledge Handbook of Shakespeare and Memory (2017). He has presented upon his research to audiences in over fifteen countries, most recently in Japan, Canada, Czech Republic, Italy, France, and Germany. His research is or has been supported by funding bodies such as the Irish Research Council, AHRC and ESRC, and institutions such as The Huntington Library, California, where he will hold a Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowship in the spring of 2020.  

Dr Loughnane is currently at work on several major research projects. He is the editor of The Complete Works of Cyril Tourneur for Revels Plays (Manchester University Press, forthcoming, 2020), the first edition of the poet-dramatist’s complete works since 1930. With Andrew J. Power, he has recently edited a new essay collection about the formative period of Shakespeare’s career, Early Shakespeare, 1588-1594 (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming, 2019). With Will Sharpe, he is editing a major new 40+ essay collection, The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Authorship (Oxford University Press, forthcoming, 2021). With William E. Engel and Grant Williams, he is undertaking a new anthology about The Death Arts in Renaissance England (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming, 2021), which will include over 80 edited excerpts. His next major project will concern the works of Christopher Marlowe. With Laurie Maguire, he edits the Routledge monograph series, Studies in Early Modern Authorship

Born and raised in Co. Clare, Ireland, he undertook BA (English Studies) and PhD studies at Trinity College Dublin. He was then awarded an IRCHSS Postdoctoral Fellowship at the same university, which he cut short to join Syracuse University as a Visiting Assistant Professor. He next moved to Indiana University-Indianapolis to join the New Oxford Shakespeare editorial team. Dr Loughnane is a dual citizen of Ireland and the US. He joined the University of Kent in the summer of 2016.  

Research interests

Dr Loughnane’s research interests fall, broadly, into four areas:

  • Editing and Textual Studies
  • Authorship (practices of, attribution studies)
  • History of Ideas (memory, death, love, rhetoric, conduct)
  • Literary Criticism (transgression and normality, nationality, feminism and gender studies)  


Supervision

Dr Loughnane would welcome the opportunity to speak to any prospective graduate students interested in the following areas of study:

  • Early Modern Literature and Drama
  • Editing and Textual Studies (1500-1700)
  • Authorship (practices of, attribution studies)
  • History of Ideas (memory, death, love, rhetoric, conduct)
  • Literary Criticism (transgression and normality, nationality, feminism and gender studies)
  • Digital Humanities  


Professional

  • Shakespeare Association of America (2020 planning committee)
  • Renaissance Society of America
  • Malone Society
  • Marlowe Society of America


Publications

Article

  • Loughnane, R. (2019). What doesn’t happen in Hamlet. Critical Survey [Online]. Available at: https://doi.org/10.3167/cs.2019.31010213.
    W.W. Greg first identified the dumb show in Hamlet as problematic: if Claudius sees the dumb show, which replicates his murder of Old Hamlet in mime, then why does he not react until much later? Many explanations have been offered, and this article responds to (in title and argument) John Dover Wilson’s influential account in What Happens in Hamlet (1935) which inspired much further debate. First discussing the anomalous nature of the dumb show in Hamlet, before turning to the different versions of the dumb show as they appear in the three substantive texts of Hamlet, this article considers the nature and content of the information supplied by dumb shows and the critical arguments that can be developed from these slippery inset performances.
  • Loughnane, R. (2019). Studied Speech and The Duchess of Malfi: The Lost Arts of Rhetoric, Memory, and Death. Sillages Critiques [Online] 26. Available at: https://journals.openedition.org/sillagescritiques/6847.
    In this article, Loughnane uses two key lines from the opening scene of Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi about the two brothers’ ‘studied speech’ to discuss how the play’s themes and ideas connect to a broader cultural preoccupation with practices of habitual preparation. Drawing on a wide range of early modern texts, Loughnane discusses the prevalence and proliferation of how-to manuals instructing readers how best to prepare for various activities and duties. In particular, he focuses upon manuals about conduct, memory, rhetoric, and death, connecting their aims and objectives to the tragedy that unfolds in Webster’s play. He situates the Duchess’s tragic outcome in her failure to heed her brothers’ warning, and in mistaking their contrived ‘studied speech’ for something without substance.
  • Loughnane, R. (2017). Column: Shakespeare’s Solo Authorship. TheJournal.ie [Online]. Available at: http://www.thejournal.ie/readme/column-shakespeares-solo-authorship-of-certain-plays-remains-in-question-3357893-May2017/.
  • Loughnane, R. (2017). Re-editing Non-Shakespeare for the Modern Reader: The Murder of Mutius in Titus Andronicus. The Review of English Studies [Online] 68:268-295. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/res/hgw078.
    It has long been suspected that Titus Andronicus is a co-authored play, though it has never been edited as one. A century and more of attribution scholarship has determined that George Peele is the author of the long opening scene of the play, but no recent editor of the play has treated the issue of co-authorship seriously and edited the opening scene with Peelean, rather than Shakespearean, parallels in mind. However, all editors of the play must confront the many difficult editorial cruces in the scene, not least those involving staging. One particularly troublesome passage involves Titus’s killing of his son, Mutius. Building upon evidence for Peele’s authorship of the opening scene, Brian Boyd proposed that this murder was a late addition by Peele after Shakespeare had written the rest of the play. This essay challenges Boyd’s late addition theory, offers new evidence about Shakespeare’s light revision of the opening scene, and provides an account about how these issues impact upon editorial decision-making.
  • Loughnane, R. (2017). Shakespeare in the 1580s. Shakespeare Studies [Online] 45:121-128. Available at: http://sites.bu.edu/shakespearestudies/home/current-issue/.
  • Loughnane, R., Power, A. and Sillitoe, P. (2014). Introduction to The Yearbook of English Studies. The Yearbook of English Studies [Online] 44:1-11. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0001.
  • Loughnane, R. (2014). Reputation and the Red Bull Theatre, 1625-1642. The Yearbook of English Studies, 2014 [Online] 44:29-50. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0029.
    The Red Bull theatre in Clerkenwell has long held a poor reputation among scholars. Most serious critical attention has focused on the early years of the theatre, from its construction in 1604 to the subsequent repertories of Queen Anne's Men and Prince Charles's Men, who performed there during the Jacobean period. This essay surveys extant evidence about the Red Bull from the accession of Charles I in 1625 until the closure of the theatres in 1642, and challenges received critical narratives about the poor reputation of the Red Bull in this period. It concludes with a discussion about how such scholarly views become entrenched and the risk involved in making critical assumptions about reputation based on meagre historical and literary evidence.

Book section

  • Loughnane, R. and Power, A. (2020). Introduction: Beginning with Shakespeare. In: Loughnane, R. and Power, A. J. eds. Early Shakespeare, 1588-1594. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-20. Available at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1017/9781108861748.
  • Loughnane, R. (2020). Shakespeare and the Idea of Early Authorship. In: Loughnane, R. and Power, A. J. eds. Early Shakespeare, 1588-1594. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, pp. 21-53. Available at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1017/9781108861748.
  • Loughnane, R. (2019). Introduction: Stages of Normality. In: Loughnane, R. and Semple, E. eds. Staged Normality in Shakespeare’s England. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1 -29.
  • Loughnane, R. (2017). Marlowe and Shakespeare, Co-Authors. In: Power, A. J. ed. The Birth and Death of the Author: A Multi-Authored History of Authorship C15th - C21st. New York: Routledge.
  • Loughnane, R. (2017). Shakespeare, memory, and new media. In: Hiscock, A. and Wilder, L. P. eds. The Routledge Handbook of Shakespeare and Memory. London and New York: Routledge, pp. 73-90. Available at: https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Handbook-of-Shakespeare-and-Memory/Hiscock-Perkins-Wilder/p/book/9781138816763.
  • Loughnane, R. (2017). Thomas Middleton in All’s Well that Ends Well? Part One. In: Taylor, G. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Authorship Companion. Oxford, Uk: Oxford University Press, pp. 278-302. Available at: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-new-oxford-shakespeare-authorship-companion-9780199591169?cc=gb&lang=en&.
  • Loughnane, R. (2017). Thomas Middleton in All’s Well that Ends Well? Part Two. In: Taylor, G. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Authorship Companion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, pp. 321-337. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591169.001.0001.
  • Taylor, G. and Loughnane, R. (2017). The Canon and Chronology of Shakespeare’s Works. In: Taylor, G. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Authorship Companion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, pp. 417-603. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591169.001.0001.
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). The Medieval Inheritance. In: Neill, M. and Schalkwyk, D. eds. The Oxford Handbook of Shakespearean Tragedy. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, pp. 35-53. Available at: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-oxford-handbook-of-shakespearean-tragedy-9780198724193?cc=gb&lang=en&.
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). The virginity dialogue in All’s Well that Ends Well: feminism, editing, and adaptation. In: Callaghan, D. ed. A Feminist Companion to Shakespeare. Malden, MA, USA: Wiley Blackwell, pp. 411-427. Available at: http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118501268.html.
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). 2 Henry VI. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of Henry VI, Part Two in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). Edward III. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of The Reign of King Edward III in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). The Merchant of Venice. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of The Merchant of Venice in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). Henry V. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of The Life of Henry the Fifth in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). Twelfth Night. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of Twelfth Night; or, What you Will in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). All’s Well that Ends Well. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of All's Well that Ends Well in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). Pericles, Prince of Tyre. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of Pericles, Prince of Tyre in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). Cymbeline, King of Britain. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of Cymbeline, King of Britain in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). The Tempest. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of The Tempest in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). The Two Noble Kinsmen. In: Taylor, G., Jowett, J., Bourus, T. and Egan, G. eds. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199591152.book.1.
    Edition of The Two Noble Kinsmen in "The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition: The Complete Works"
  • Loughnane, R. (2013). Stages of Transgression. In: Loughnane, R. and Semple, E. eds. Staged Transgression in Shakespeare’s England. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1-23. Available at: http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137349347.
  • Loughnane, R. and Maley, W. (2013). Celtic Connections and Archipelagic Angles. In: Maley, W. ed. Celtic Shakespeare: The Bard and the Borderers. Routledge, pp. 1-24. Available at: https://www.routledge.com/Celtic-Shakespeare-The-Bard-and-the-Borderers/Loughnane-Maley/p/book/9781409422594.
  • Loughnane, R. (2013). “I myself would for Caernarfonshire”: The Old Lady in King Henry VIII. In: Loughnane, R. and Maley, W. eds. Celtic Shakespeare: The Bard and the Borderers. Farnham, Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, pp. 185-204.
  • Loughnane, R. (2013). The Artificial Figures in Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi. In: Rist, T. and Gordon, A. eds. The Arts of Remembrance in Early Modern England. Farnham, Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, pp. 211-228. Available at: https://www.routledge.com/The-Arts-of-Remembrance-in-Early-Modern-England-Memorial-Cultures-of-the/Gordon-Rist/p/book/9781409446576.
  • Loughnane, R. (2012). The framework for playgoer response in King Henry VIII. In: Loughnane, R. and Power, A. J. eds. Late Shakespeare, 1608-1613. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, pp. 108-123. Available at: http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9781139786379&ss=toc.
  • Power, A. and Loughnane, R. (2012). Introduction to Late Shakespeare, 1608-1613. In: Power, A. J. and Loughnane, R. eds. Late Shakespeare, 1608-1613. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-15. Available at: http://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/literature/renaissance-and-early-modern-literature/late-shakespeare-16081613?format=HB&isbn=9781107016194#mlDUxqMcj9ZdMhRx.97.
  • Loughnane, R. (2012). The Enigma of Divine Revelation in Tourneur’s The Atheist’s Tragedy. In: Sweetnam, M. and Cooney, H. eds. Enigma and Revelation in Renaissance English Literature. Dublin, Ireland: Four Courts Press, pp. 136-151. Available at: http://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/2012/enigma-and-revelation-in-renaissance-english-literature/contents.

Edited book

  • Loughnane, R. (2020). Early Shakespeare, 1588-1594. Loughnane, R. and Power, A. J. eds. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Early Shakespeare, 1588–1594 draws together leading scholars of text, performance, and theatre history to offer a rigorous re-appraisal of Shakespeare's early career. The contributors offer rich new critical insights into the theatrical and poetic context in which Shakespeare first wrote and his emergence as an author of note, while challenging traditional readings of his beginnings in the burgeoning theatre industry. Shakespeare's earliest works are treated on their own merit and in their own time without looking forward to Shakespeare's later achievements; contributors situate Shakespeare, in his twenties, in a very specific time, place, and cultural moment. The volume features essays about Shakespeare's early style, characterisation, and dramaturgy, together with analysis of his early co-authors, rivals, and influences (including Lyly, Spenser and Marlowe). This collection provides essential entry points to, and original readings of, the poet-dramatist's earliest extant writings and shines new light on his first activities as a professional author.
  • Loughnane, R. (2019). Staged Normality in Shakespeare’s England. [Online]. Loughnane, R. and Semple, E. eds. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. Available at: https://www.palgrave.com/gb/book/9783030008918.
    This book looks at the staging and performance of normality in early modern drama. Analysing conventions and rules, habitual practices, common things and objects, and mundane sights and experiences, this volume foregrounds a staged normality that has been heretofore unseen, ignored, or taken for granted. It draws together leading and emerging scholars of early modern theatre and culture to debate the meaning of normality in an early modern context and to discuss how it might transfer to the stage. In doing so, these original critical essays unsettle and challenge scholarly assumptions about how normality is represented in the performance space. The volume, which responds to studies of the everyday and the material turn in cultural history, as well as to broader philosophical engagements with the idea of normality and its opposites, brings to light the essential role that normality plays in the composition and performance of early modern drama.
  • Engel, W., Loughnane, R. and Williams, G. (2016). The Memory Arts in Renaissance England: A Critical Anthology. [Online]. Engel, W. E., Loughnane, R. and Williams, G. eds. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Available at: http://www.cambridge.org/zw/academic/subjects/literature/renaissance-and-early-modern-literature/memory-arts-renaissance-england-critical-anthology?format=HB.
    This is the first critical anthology of writings about memory in Renaissance England. Drawing together excerpts from more than seventy writers, poets, physicians, philosophers and preachers, and with over twenty illustrations, the anthology offers the reader a guided exploration of the arts of memory. The introduction outlines the context for the tradition of the memory arts from classical times to the Renaissance and is followed by extracts from writers on the art of memory in general, then by thematically arranged sections on rhetoric and poetry, education and science, history and philosophy, religion, and literature, featuring texts from canonical, non-canonical and little-known sources. Each excerpt is supported with notes about the author and about the text's relationship to the memory arts, and includes suggestions for further reading. The book will appeal to students of the memory arts, Renaissance literature, the history of ideas, book history and art history.
  • Loughnane, R. (2013). Celtic Shakespeare: The Bard and the Borderers. Maley, W. and Loughnane, R. eds. Farnham, Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
    Drawing together some of the leading academics in the field of Shakespeare studies, this volume examines the commonalities and differences in addressing a notionally 'Celtic' Shakespeare. Celtic contexts have been established for many of Shakespeare's plays, and there has been interest too in the ways in which Irish, Scottish and Welsh critics, editors and translators have reimagined Shakespeare, claiming, connecting with and correcting him. This collection fills a major gap in literary criticism by bringing together the best scholarship on the individual nations of Ireland, Scotland and Wales in a way that emphasizes cultural crossovers and crucibles of conflict. The volume is divided into three chronologically ordered sections: Tudor Reflections, Stuart Revisions and Celtic Afterlives. This division of essays directs attention to Shakespeare's transformed treatment of national identity in plays written respectively in the reigns of Elizabeth and James, but also takes account of later regional receptions and the cultural impact of the playwright's dramatic works. The first two sections contain fresh readings of a number of the individual plays, and pay particular attention to the ways in which Shakespeare attends to contemporary understandings of national identity in the light of recent history. Juxtaposing this material with subsequent critical receptions of Shakespeare's works, from Milton to Shaw, this volume addresses a significant critical lacuna in Shakespearean criticism. Rather than reading these plays from a solitary national perspective, the essays in this volume cohere in a wide-ranging treatment of Shakespeare's direct and oblique references to the archipelago, and the problematic issue of national identity.
  • Loughnane, R. (2013). Staged Transgression in Shakespeare’s England. [Online]. Loughnane, R. ed. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave MacMillan. Available at: http://www.palgrave.com/br/book/9781137349347.
    Staged Transgression in Shakespeare's England is a groundbreaking collection of seventeen essays, drawing together leading and emerging scholars to discuss and challenge critical assumptions about the transgressive nature of the early modern English stage. These essays shed new light on issues of gender, race, sexuality, law and politics.
  • Loughnane, R. (2012). Late Shakespeare, 1608-1613. [Online]. Loughnane, R. and Power, A. J. eds. Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press. Available at: http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9781139786379.
    In fourteen specially commissioned chapters by leading Shakespeare scholars from around the globe, Late Shakespeare, 1608–1613 provides an essential reappraisal of the final phase of Shakespeare's writing life. Arranged for the first time in the best-established chronological sequence, Shakespeare's last seven extant plays are discussed in detail in dedicated chapters, from Pericles to the other late co-authored works, King Henry VIII and The Two Noble Kinsmen. The plays are situated in the context of Shakespeare's financial investments, his focus on the practice of reading, the changing nature of his acting company and the pressing issues of contemporary politics and urban life. The book also goes on to explore the relationship between Shakespeare and his audience and considers the dominant themes in his final works. Analysing and responding to the latest criticism in the field, this volume brings to light a vital re-examination of what it means to discuss 'late Shakespeare'.

Edited journal

  • Loughnane, R., Power, A.J. and Sillitoe, P. eds. (2014). The Yearbook of English Studies, 2014 (Caroline Literature). The Yearbook of English Studies, 2014 44:1-294.
    Despite the wealth of writing produced in this period, Caroline literature has not been as widely studied as the acknowledged ‘golden age’ that preceded it. Indeed, until recently, much critical emphasis had focused on how these writings pre-empt the ruptures of civil war to come. The present volume offers a timely corrective to such a narrow view of this exciting period of writing.

Internet publication

  • Loughnane, R. (2016). Marlowe, Not Shakespeare—so What? [website - blog]. Available at: https://blog.oup.com/2016/11/marlowe-shakespeare-play-authorship/.
  • Loughnane, R. (2016). The Court Poet and the Art of Memory [website - blog]. Available at: http://www.cambridgeblog.org/2016/08/the-court-poet-and-the-art-of-memory/.

Forthcoming

  • Loughnane, R., Engel, W.E. and Williams, G. eds. (2020). Memory and Mortality in Renaissance England. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Loughnane, R. (2019). The Death Arts in Renaissance England: A Critical Anthology. Engel, W. E., Loughnane, R. and Williams, G. eds. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Loughnane, R. (2019). The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Authorship. Loughnane, R. and Sharpe, W. eds. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Loughnane, R. (2017). The Complete Works of Cyril Tourneur.
    The first edition of Cyril Tourneur's complete works undertaken since 1930.
Last updated