Study Plus Courses

Broadening horizons and expanding minds


Our previous courses

KE002 - Gaining Work Experience: A Practical Guide to Boosting Your Graduate Prospects

Course dates:
Times:
Number of hours: 10 hours
Employability Points: 50 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

employment

Gaining Work Experience in the UK

Course outline

The purpose of this module is to equip participants with the key skills necessary for obtaining meaningful work experience alongside academic studies.  The module will cover all areas of job hunting including key skills such as how to approach an employer, how to write appropriate applications and how to manage your brand and the expectations of employers to ensure you maximise the opportunity and increase your chances of further work offers.  We will look at managing your time effectively, how to exploit your existing networks and how to develop new ones.  This module will predominantly be taught through lectures; however additional 1-2-1 support is also available.

Most sessions will be interactive workshops – some will use computers.  There will be 10 hours of workshops in total, much of this spent in discussion and practical application.  There is minimal independent work – you will be asked to develop your CV as part of the workshop and will receive feedback.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, students should be able to;

  • Identify a suitable structure and create a CV appropriate for gaining work experience
  • Understand common recruitment practices
  • Be able to research potential employers
  • Understand how to make successful speculative applications
  • Understand the principles of effective interview preparation and technique
  • Be aware of basic standards of professionalism and how to cope in the workplace
  • Understand the importance of commercial awareness and be able to identify ways of developing this key employability attribute
  • Have raised understanding of intercultural awareness
  • Be able to identify and articulate their skills in a way appropriate for employers

 

KE004 - Dirty History: Exploring Film & TV Medievalisms

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 4 hours
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

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Dirty History

Course outline

This one-day course explores the curiosities surrounding accuracy and fantasy in medieval historical drama, such as 'Game of Thrones', 'The Last Kingdom', 'Vikings' and 'The White Queen', as well as Justin Kurzel's 2015 film 'Macbeth'. You will consider why more recent medieval TV and film shares a lack of sexual and violent inhibition about the past.  The course also aims to explore how medieval films are as much about the past as the present in debating the social and political issues that we might be afraid to admit are disturbingly modern rather than relics of an imagined past.

Learning outcomes

This course will enable you to:

  • explore and debate the tensions between historical authenticity and accuracy and the fantasy nature of the medieval historical drama and its continual popularity and appeal with audiences
  • examine and better understand why the medieval period is consistently stereotyped as dirty and violent and how this is transmitted both semiotically and historiographically
  • gain knowledge of specialist film language to describe and analyse TV dramas and films

 

KE005 - Mindfulness Based Stress Relief and Cognitive Therapy

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Mindfulness Based Stress Relief and Cognitive Therapy

Start date:
End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 6x 2 hour sessions
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Course outline

Mindfulness can reduce stress and anxiety, improve concentration, creativity, focus and productivity, can strengthen memory , improve health and cultivate an overall sense of well-being.
The course offers a combination of two programs: Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy and Mindfulness Based Stress Relief. It has been tailored to make it relevant and accessible to students. It involves sustained, in-depth training in suspending habitual ways of thinking and perceiving.
The weekly sessions focus on the core practices of mindfulness. Alongside the three main meditative practices included in each session, there are a number of practical exercises to help you understand yourself and the theory better.
There is weekly homework: the feedback from this and the direct experience of these practices forms the basis of the formal teaching.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, you will:

  • be able to positively apply the theory and practice of mindfulness to the way you live your life
  • learn skills of motivation and focus, which will help you with your studies
  • learn techniques to help you deal better with difficulties and stress levels

     

KE007 - Business Mandarin for beginners

Start date:
End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 5 x 2 hour sessions
Employability Points: 50 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

MandarinBusiness Mandarin for beginners

Image by User:Kjoonlee, User:Tomchen1989 - Own work, APL, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2040775

Course outline

This course is for students who are beginners or who have very little knowledge of Mandarin. It will introduce you to daily spoken communication in Mandarin, in a business setting. It aims to help you understand the language, culture and business culture in China, use appropriate ways to greet and introduce yourself and their business, make appointments and establish business relations.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you will :

  • have a basic knowledge of China, the language, the culture in general and in business context.
  • be able to communicate in Mandarin in everyday business situations , such as:
    • introducing yourself and greeting people in the appropriate way 
    • introducing people to one another and exchanging business cards
    • giving information about your business
    • making a business appointment; issuing/replying to a business invitation
    • hosting/attending a dinner

 

 

 

KE011 - Gaining Work Experience and Employment in the UK (Medway)

Course dates:
Time:
Location: Medway Campus
Number of hours: 10 hours (2x 5 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 50 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

employment

Gaining Work Experience and Employment in the UK

Course outline

The purpose of this module is to equip participants with the key skills necessary for obtaining meaningful work experience alongside academic studies.  The module will cover all areas of job hunting including key skills such as how to approach an employer, how to write appropriate applications and how to manage your brand and the expectations of employers to ensure you maximise the opportunity and increase your chances of further work offers.  We will look at how to exploit your existing networks and how to develop new ones.  This module will predominantly be taught through lectures; however additional 1-2-1 support is also available.

 

Please note, this course will be held at the Medway Campus. For all Canterbury-based students, a free shuttle bus is available. Details of this service is available at the following link:

http://www.kent.ac.uk/campus-shuttle/

You will need to book a ticket online beforeyou travel.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, students should be able to;

  • Identify their own employability skills from an employer’s perspective
  • Understand personal branding and the use of social media for career success
  • Identify a suitable structure and create a CV appropriate for gaining work experience
  • Understand common recruitment practices
  • Be able to research potential employers
  • Understand how to make successful speculative applications
  • Understand the principles of effective interview preparation and technique
  • Understand psychometric assessments and how they are used
  • To understand assessment centres and how to maximise impact.

 

KE017 - Towns and Townspeople in Medieval England

towns-and-townspeople-in-medieval-england

Towns and Townspeople in Medieval England

Start date:
End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 24 hours (12x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Course outline

From a time of considerable expansion in the High Middle Ages, many towns experienced decay and decline in the later medieval period, while at the same time also witnessing an upsurge in the beautification of churches and the construction of guild halls and town walls. Using a wide variety of documents, in translation, produced by the townspeople themselves, students will look at a number of different towns in England to explore ideas about urban life during this period. Thus they will examine, for example, what jobs people did and how they cared for the poor, as well as who was punished for insulting town officers, stealing from hedges and playing cards in the ale house. There will be an optional additional field trip if there is sufficient interest.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of how and why urban society developed in medieval England, and the importance of variation among towns both in terms of the High and Late Middle Ages
  • Discuss the role of the Church in medieval English towns
  • Discuss production and consumption in medieval households over time
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the values and limitations of various types of primary evidence

 

KE024 - Talking Cultures: Exploring Intercultural Competence

Course dates:
Times:
Number of hours: 10 hours (5 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

employment

Talking Cultures

Course outline

The module which tackles the notion of intercultural communication, aims to develop students' engagement and integration with their fellow classmates within a contemporary internationalised classroom. The module will help to increase awareness of cultural differences and will explore cultural heritage, prejudices and stereotypes.
Thematic areas that will be covered in the seminar/workshops but not necessarily in the order they are presented below are:

  • Cultural knowledge and identity (of other cultures, people, nations, behaviours ...) with emphasis on ways to compare and contrast cultures, identify fundamental differences between cultures and the notion of cross-cultural understanding
  • Politeness, respect and power
  • Identifications of problems that can occur during spoken discourse and social interaction

Learning outcomes

Students successfully completing this module will:

  • have a greater understanding of the way people communicate  within and across social groups
  • have a greater understanding of their own culture and themselves
  • awareness of ethnocentrism
  • awareness of cultural bias
  • knowledge about other cultures
  • develop a sensitivity to the social, cultural and political issues which surround language

 

KE028 - Rosie 1 - Virtually Safe: Serious Games & Simulation in Child Protection

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Rosie 1 - Virtually Safe

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 3 hours
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

 

Course outline

A half-day session combining lecture delivery with seminar discussion. You will learn about contemporary approaches to learning in child protection and the application of and potential for learning through simulation and serious games. The child protection (serious game) concept offers a safe and new medium to explore and reflect upon child protection assessment and practice. It offers a unique and innovative way to evaluate child protection situations.
"Rosie 1": Virtually Safe is a computer-based simulation developed by the Centre for Child Protection (CPP) to explore different ways of training social workers. It focuses on communication, listening and decision-making as critical to good practice.
The course looks at:

  • what is a serious game/simulation?
  • what are the benefits of technology in professional training?
  • how and why did the CPP develop "Rosie 1"?
  • playing the game
  • the making of Rosie 1 - video podcast

The session is relevant to many programmes of study and will enhance your understanding of the potential for enhanced learning through technology.
This is part of a series of courses from the Centre for Child Protection, which is a hub of excellence and innovation in training, research and practice and has been recognised by the THE Awards 2013 as a nominee for "Outstanding ICT Initiative".

Rosie 1 can be downloaded from the CPP website: http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/simulationsindex.html
We would encourage participants to play Rosie 1 prior to the session, though this is not essential.

Please be aware that this course discusses difficult and sensitive issues relating to child protection. We would encourage you to seek appropriate support and advice if the course content raises any personal issues or causes you distress.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, you will:

  • gain an overview of the current policy and practice base of child protection and safeguarding in the UK context
  • gain a knowledge of the relevance and potential for the use of serious games and simulations within professional training and development
  • consider how learning technologies such as simulation and serious games might be adapted to a multitude of fields and subject areas

 

 

KE029 - Rosie 2 - A Child Protection Simulation: Serious Games & Simulation in Child Protection

towns-and-townspeople

Rosie 2 - A Child Protection Simulation

Date: Tuesday week 20 ( 05 March)
Time: 14:00 - 17:00
Number of hours: 3 hours
Employability Points: 15 points maximum
(Based on 100% attendance)

 

Are you interested in learning about innovative approaches to learning in child protection?

Do you have an interest in the application and potential for learning through simulation and serious games?

Course outline

This session allows you to learn and engage with the Centre for Child Protection, which is leading proponents in the field of innovative simulation.

The computer based simulation, ’Rosie 2’, was developed by the Centre for Child Protection in 2012, in direct response to evidence and research in the area of child protection. It is a professional learning and development tool designed to be used by professionals working in child protection (social workers, nurses, teachers, police etc.) to explore and better understand the issue of child neglect.

The child protection simulation (serious game) concept offers a safe new medium to explore and reflect upon child protection assessment and practice. It offers a unique and innovative way to evaluate child protection situations.

The session has broad disciplinary relevance and will enhance your understanding of the potential for learning through technology.

This is an exciting opportunity to learn about a difficult topic and consider how we should respond in the 21st century, using a relevant evidence base and technological know-how.

Content:

  • what is a serious game/simulation?
  • what are the benefits of the use of technology in professional training?
  • how did the Centre for Child Protection develop ‘Rosie 2’ and why?
  • playing the game – how does this simulation work and engage professionals?
  • eye tracker and facial recognition technology

The session combines a lecture with seminar discussion.

Please be aware that this course discusses difficult and sensitive issues relating to child protection. We would encourage you to seek appropriate support and advice if the course content raises any personal issues or causes you distress.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, you will:

  • have an overview of the current policy and practice base of child protection in the UK context
  • be able to identify and discuss some of the key elements of child neglect.
  • know the significance of using child protection simulations (serious games) in developing skills and knowledge in a highly emotive working environment
  • know aboutt the Centre’s research using eye tracker and facial recognition technology
  • have had an opportunity to discuss how decisions are made, their impact upon workers and the importance of achieving the best outcomes for children

 

KE032 - Talking Cultures: Exploring Intercultural Competence (for Study Abroad Students)

Please note this course is only open to University of Kent students who have just returned from the Study Abroad Programme.

Start date:
End date:
Time: 14:00pm-15:00pm
Number of hours: 1 hour
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance for successfully completing all three sessions of the course which began in the academic year 2013-2014)

Dirty History

Talking Cultures: Exploring Intercultural Competence

Course outline

The module which tackles the notion of intercultural communication, aims to develop students' engagement and integration with their fellow classmates within a contemporary internationalised classroom. The module will help to increase awareness of cultural differences and will explore cultural heritage, prejudices and stereotypes.

Thematic areas that will be covered in Session 4 workshop, but not necessarily in the order they are presented below are:

  • Intercultural Competence Framework
  • Revisit what is culture and why is culture important?
  • Response to questions / Reflecting on your cultural encounters
  • What is reverse culture shock?
  • Feedback

Learning outcomes

Students successfully completing this module will:

  • have a greater understanding of the way people communicate  within and across social groups
  • have a greater understanding of their own culture and themselves
  • awareness of ethnocentrism
  • awareness of cultural bias
  • knowledge about other cultures
  • develop a sensitivity to the social, cultural and political issues which surround language

 

KE043 - Employability Skills

Start date:
End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 10 hours (5 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 50 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Dirty History

Employability Skills

Course outline

This practical course is suitable for UG and PG students and will provide you with the opportunity to;

  • Build a great CV
  • Develop and manage your ‘own brand’ via social media
  • Explore job hunting methods
  • Practice interview techniques
  • Develop key technical and social skills

All sessions will be workshop-based and will take place in a computer suite, providing participants with practical opportunities each week.

Learning outcomes

  • By the end of this course, you should be able to:

    • Create an appropriate CV
    • Be able to research potential employers and job sectors
    • Understand how to make successful applications
    • Understand the principles of effective interview preparation and technique
    • Be aware of basic standards of professionalism and how to cope in the workplace
    • Understand the importance of commercial awareness and to identify ways of developing this key employability attribute

This course has now started, signups are closed.

KE045 - Stone Carving

Start date:
End date:
Time: Wednesdays, 18:00-21:00
Number of hours:
18 hours
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

stone_carving

Stone Carving

Course outline

Stone carving was one of the first human skills. Students will work to produce a sculpture from start to finish, with instruction on the use of tools, carving techniques and composition. Tools and stone are provided and you may carve whatever you choose. You must wear suitable footwear for health and safety reasons. The stone used is from the Canterbury Cathedral restoration programme, turning the ancient into the modern.

Learning outcomes

  • You will learn about the workshop environment, how to use hammers and chisels in the correct manner, as well as articulation appropriate to masonary and sculpture
  • The aim is to produce a finished sculpture, which will be exhibited in the school

You will need to wear sturdy footwear and a hat as you will be handling heavy blocks of stone and there will be a lot of dust. Safety equipment is provided.

 

 

KE049 - Great Expectations? Life and Landscape on the North Kent Coast

Date:
Time: 11:00 - 17:00
Number of hours: 6 hours
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

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Great Expectations?

Course outline

Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations was set in the marshes of north Kent, and these marshes are the anticipated location of ‘Boris Island’ (the Thames estuary airport) and Britain’s new ‘garden city’ at Ebbsfleet. We shall explore the origins of the extraordinary remoteness of the marshlands which inspired Dickens, beginning with the Roman and medieval periods. From new historical and archaeological research, we will consider the early reclamation which allowed the area’s valuable resources to be exploited, and the notable medieval chapels, churches and priories which developed on the marshlands. There is a great contrast to be marked between the profoundly localized way of life of the inhabitants and that of a few rich but influential outsiders who utilised this important area for reasons of defence and as a safe haven from plague; the latter included Londoners and even one of its Lord Mayors. Lastly we will note the connections between Kent’s second city, Rochester, and the surrounding lowlands, and investigate Dickens’ beloved home in this locality, Gads Hill.

Learning outcomes

This course will enable you to:

  • gain an overview of the nature of this important and rapidly-changing locality near London
  • understand how research from history and archaeology offers insights into other disciplines
  • be able to relate their reading of books by Dickens to the Kentish landscape

 

KE051 - Writing And Directing Feature Length Fiction For Cinema: The Selfish Giant, a case study

Date:
Time: 14:00 - 17:00
Number of hours: 3 hours
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

The Selfish Giant

Course outline

The interactive workshop will last for three hours; it will explore writing and directing a feature film for theatrical distribution using The Selfish Giant (Dir. Clio Barnard Film4 BFI 2013 90mins) as a case study.

One hour will focus on discussing development, research and screenwriting, another hour on pre-production/production/post-production, and another hour on distribution and exhibition.

The workshop will give the participants an introductory overview of writing and directing a feature film for theatrical distribution from initial idea through to completion and exhibition.

All participants must watch the film in preparation for the workshop. You can access  a DVD of the film free of charge in the university library. You can also stream it via the BFI
http://player.bfi.org.uk/film/watch-the-selfish-giant-2013/ and claim the cost of this if you bring proof of payment to the workshop.

Learning outcomes

During this module, students will:

  • explore the writing and directing of a feature film for theatrical distribution using The Selfish Giant (Dir. Clio Barnard Film4 BFI 2013 90mins) as a case study
  • have the opportunity to discuss what is involved with the development, research and screenwriting of a film
  • consider key concepts involved with film production such as pre-production/production/post-production
  • explore what is involved with the distribution and exhibition of a feature length film

 

KE057 - A Short History of the Cornish Language

Date:
Time: 14:00 - 17:00
Number of hours: 3 hours
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

employment

A Short History of the Cornish Language

Course outline

This 3 hour course consists of 2 parts:

  1. A short one hour taster lesson to learn to speak a few phrases of Cornish.
  2. A brief history of the Cornish language that explores the Celtic origins of Cornish, the classical Cornish literature of the Middle Ages, the decline of the language in the 17th and 18th centuries, and finally the process of its revival.

Learning outcomes

Students completing this module will:

  • learn about the history of the Cornish language, through the Middle Ages until its revival over the last century
  • learn to say a few phrases in Cornish.

 

 

KE059 - Working in the Art World

Course date:
Time: Thursday, 09:30- 17:00
Number of hours: 6 hours
Employability Points: 30 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

employment

Fine Art Degree Show 2014 in School of Music and Fine Art, Chatham Historic Dockyard

Course outline

  • This module will be taught by Eleni Duke, Gallerist, Curious Duke Gallery (and Kent alumna) , with Dr Grant Pooke from School of Arts. It is designed to introduce students to some of the practicalities, requirements and aptitudes of developing a career in the art world.

    This course should be of principal interest to Final Year and PG/T students with an interest in working in the creative sector and its contents will therefore approximate to that expected of H/M level cohorts.

  • Students will be asked to produce a personal statement/pitch document for supporting onward employment and course applications.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, participants should have:

  • An enhanced awareness of some of the roles and career options available within the contemporary visual arts sector;
  • A basic guide to creative entrepreneurial options
  • An appreciation of some of the skills (creative, financial, general and self-management) which are required in this sector
  • An understanding of some of the providers of relevant and further skills training and professional development opportunities
  • An opportunity for attendees to reflect upon skills, aptitudes and strengths in respect of  career, further training, development and employment options available

 

KE060 - Woodland Coppicing: Understanding and Practice

Date: Tuesday week 19 (26 February)
Time: 12:00 - 16:00
Number of hours: 1x 4 hour session
Employability Points: 10 points (Based on 100% attendance)

Woodland coppicing

Course outline

This course will comprise of a field workshop in which students will be given a brief introduction to the history, value and practice of coppicing as a productive form of woodland management, instruction in coppicing tool use, and hands-on practice in collaboratively coppicing several trees.

Students will only need to be properly prepared by wearing old clothes and sturdy footwear. There will be a formative assessment in the form of the observation and discussion of their coppicing practice.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students will have an understanding of the basics of coppicing as a means of woodland management and be able to use the appropriate tools correctly whilst collaborating in coppicing practice.

 

You will need to wear old clothes and sturdy footwear.

The craft area in Brotherhood Wood is accessible to anyone who can walk without significant difficulty.

 

 

 

KE061 - Woodland Crafts: Making a Basket to Contain Your Stress

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1x 4 hour session
Employability Points: 10 points (Based on 100% attendance)

basket

Basket making

 

Course outline

This course comprises of a field workshop in which you will make a simple basket through a process of interacting with the construction materials. The key objective of the course will be to reflect upon this making as a means of self-expression and release/relief of stress.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the workshop you will:

understand the materials (hazel + willow) and how to manipulate them into a basic basket design

explore the creative process as a means of engaging in stress-relief

there will be a formative assessment in the form of the observation and discussion of your basket making, and your reflections upon it

 

You will need to wear old clothes and sturdy footwear.

The craft area in Brotherhood Wood is accessible to anyone who can walk without significant difficulty.

 

 

 

KE065 - A Tweet is Forever: Where our data goes and what we can do with it

Date:
Time: 13:00-16:00
Number of hours: 3 hours
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Dirty History

A Tweet is Forever

Course outline

The course will comprise a half-day lecture and practical session which will cover::

  1. An introduction to Big Data. What is it? How we all generate data in our daily lives through our digital interactions (social media, browsing the web, shopping etc.).
  2. What do companies and the government do with this data? Should we be worried?
  3. What can you do with this data? A live practical demonstration of how to retrieve and analyse data from Twitter. If they wish, students can bring their own laptops and follow along – retrieving data from their own or their friends’ profiles (or anyone else they are interested in!).

 

No independent learning hours are expected. However, students will be provided with the (fully documented) code used in the lectures (for the open source R program) if they wish to continue exploring on their own time. For students who don’t want to meddle with programming, sample social media data will be provided that can be explored in Excel.

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Understand what Big Data means
    • Understand how they produce data in their everyday lives, and how companies use this data
    • Understand the data that can be extracted simply from social networks like Twitter and Instagram, and what they can do with this data

KE066 - A History of Anthropological Theory: 1890-1980

Start date:
End date:
Time: 15:00-17:00
Number of hours: 12 hours (6x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Dirty History

A History of Anthropoogical Theory: 1890-1980

Course outline

Each session will be divided into two parts, and will consist of a lecture followed by the opportunity for students to discuss anthropology in an informal, interdisciplinary environment.

The day opens with a presentation that guides students through a particular period in anthropological history. Special attention will be given to covering 1) the creation of the main tools and concepts of anthropology 2) the major debates in anthropological history and 3) anthropologists’ relationships with their political surroundings. The course’s first meetings will deal with the paradigm of social evolution. We will then progress by looking at how inspiration from sociology and philosophy forced anthropologists in the UK, US and France to take a stand against this paradigm. Further meetings will explore notions of rationality, belief and fieldwork in British anthropology. The final parts of the course will discuss the post-war changes occurring to the discipline.

The lectures will be accompanied with PowerPoint presentations and will focus on individual, important anthropologists rather than on abstract ideas. Aside from making anthropological history easier to follow, it will urge students not to pigeonhole thinkers into theoretical paradigms, but see them as rounded characters with rich ideas.

Each presentation will open with a carefully prepared theoretical puzzle, which students will be to discuss in the second part of the day using the interpretative tools and knowledge acquired during the day. Special attention will be given towards 1) how these basic ideas have and are still influencing current theory in anthropology, 2) how classical arguments in anthropology are still relevant to daily life and 3) how anthropology complements other social sciences. Students from all disciplines can get a better idea of how anthropologists think and what their major contributions are, and will be able to approach future assignments, presentations or interviews with improved self-confidence and knowledge. Each session will end with a small conclusion, where I teach students how to summarise and synthesise conclusions from a debate.

The course will be modelled on my existing teaching techniques, where I offer 1) a driving question, 2) a body of information and 3) a set of tools and skills intended to work together. This model has received very positive feedback from students in the Autumn and Spring term of 2014/5.

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course students will:

    • Recognise anthropology as a valuable tool in navigating our contemporary world marked with financial, cultural, political and religious uncertainty.  
    • Know how to engage in multidisciplinary discussions, as this course offers students the platform to discuss what makes anthropology both similar and different from other disciplines in the way it deals with society and culture
    • enhance their presentation, collaborative, argumentative and communication skills. This improves not only fluency of argument, but also boosts their self-confidence.
    • Have learned how anthropologists produce theory by engaging with ethnography, other social sciences (including economics and sociology) and wider political and social conditions.
    • Have a grasp of the history of anthropological theory between 1890 (appointment of the first professor in Anthropology) and 1980 (collapse of structural-functionalism). This systematic understanding of the development of the discipline will help anthropology students excel in 3rd year theoretical modules, and aid in any attempt to secure ESRC funding for PhD and Postgraduate Research. History, Philosophy and Sociology students will learn how their discipline has inspired anthropology, and thus help them better appreciate their own backgrounds.
    • Have learned how to engage, appreciate and criticise anthropological theory. Students will acquire interpretative, analytical and source-working skills, improving their performance in their credit-bearing modules

KE067 - Sustainability, Environmental Management and Auditing

Start date:

End date:
Time: 14:00-16:00
Number of hours: 12 hours (6x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Dirty History

Sustainability, Environmental Management and Auditing

Course outline

Session 1: Introduction to Sustainability

  • What is meant by Sustainability and Sustainable Development?
  • Global and Local environmental challenges
  • Introduction to Environmental Law

Session 2: Environmental Management Systems (EMS)

  • Drivers for Environmental management
  • Types of EMS
  • An overview of setting up and running an EMS

Session 3: Behaviour Change

  • Setting up a behaviour change programme
  • Key challenges
  • Engaging people

Session 4: Audit skills

  • What is auditing?
  • Auditor skills
  • Audit techniques

Session 5: Auditing (practical)

  • Conducting 1 or 2 basic environmental audits of University buildings

Session 6: Auditing (practical)

  • Conducting 1 or 2 basic environmental audits of University buildings
  • Understanding audit results
  • Making recommendations

Sessions 1-4 will be classroom based and will consist of presentation and small-group exercises.
Sessions 5 and 6 will involve students conducting pre-arranged environmental audits of University buildings.

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course students will:

    • understand what is meant by Environmental Sustainability
    • understand the drivers for Environmental Management in organisations
    • have developed a knowledge of Environmental Management Systems and how organisations use them to manage their impacts
    • understand the potential benefits and challenges of an environmental behaviour change programme and develop the skills necessary to influence positive environmental behaviour in the workplace
    • have learned basic environmental auditing skills
    • have conducted several environmental audits of University buildings

 

KE068 - Excelling in the Graduate Recruitment Cycle: Your Guide to Applications, Interviews and Assessment Centres

Start date:
End date:
Time: 18:00-20:00
Number of hours: 4 hours (2 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 30 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Dirty History

Excelling in the Graduate Recruitment Cycle

Course outline

This practical module will provide participants with the opportunity to:

  • Practice interview technique and explore the different types of question asked at interview
  • Take part in a mock assessment centre and receive feedback
  • Understand exactly what employers are looking for on an application form.

All sessions will be workshop-based and will take place in a computer suite, providing participants with practical opportunities each week.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, students should:

  • Have the knowledge to perform well at interview
  • Be aware of what employers look for in application forms
  • Have a deeper understanding of the structure, purpose and style of an assessment centre

This course has ended.

KE069 - Career Management and Building Your Personal Brand

Start date:
End date:
Time: 17:00-19:00
Number of hours: 6 hours (3 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 30 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Dirty History

Career Management and Building Your Personal Brand

Course outline

This practical module will provide participants with the opportunity to:

  • be better prepared for strength-based interviews and for selling their skills to employers
  • gain tips on becoming more self-motivated and develop an awareness of what will motivate them in the workplace
  • identify short and long-term career goals and understand the steps they need to take to achieve these
  • increase their awareness of how to develop their own personal brand.

All sessions will be workshop-based and will take place in a computer suite, providing participants with practical opportunities each week.

Learning outcomes

  • By the end of this course, students should be able to:

    • Understand theories of motivation, how to become more self-motivated and why motivation is important in the workplace
    • Understand the term career management and be able to set goals in order to manage their own careers
    • Appreciate the significance of creating a personal brand and why this is important to employers

 

 

 

KE070 - Careers in the Third Sector

Start date: Monday 22 May 2017 (week 27)
End date: Monday 22 May 2017 (week 27) - one day course
Time: 17:00-20:00
Number of hours: 2 hours (1x 2 hour session)
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Dirty History

Careers in the Third Sector

Course outline

This practical module will provide participants with the opportunity to:

  • Explore the skills and experience needed to work in the Third sector
  • Search for opportunities in the Third sector
  • Develop an awareness of the culture of the Third sector

All sessions will be workshop-based and will take place in a computer suite, providing participants with practical opportunities each week.

Learning outcomes

  • By the end of this course, you should be able to:

    • Describe the Third sector
    • Understand the opportunities available to them in the Third sector
    • Have an awareness of the skills and experience needed to work in the Third sector
    • Be aware of how and where opportunities are likely to be advertised

 

KE071 - Woodland Crafts 2 – Making a Besom (Witches Broom)

Date: Tuesday 6 March 2018 (week 20)
Time: 12:00-16:00
Number of hours: 1 x 4 hour session
Location: Canterbury campus
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

mallet

Besom Making

Course outline

This course will comprise of a field workshop in which students will make a besom through a process of interacting with the construction materials. The key objective of the course will be for students to experience and understand the authentic traditional process of making, using materials from managed woodland – and to find a degree of relaxation in the process.

Learning outcomes

  • Using coppiced materials to produce a ‘besom’ or witch’s broom – a traditional coppiced woodland craft product.
  • Understanding the materials (hazel/willow brash + sweet chestnut/ash pole) and how to bring them together to create an effective besom

**Students will need to be properly prepared by wearing old clothes and sturdy footwear. Feel free to also bring a tea mug and your favourite tea bags if PG Tips won’t do.**

 

The craft area in Brotherhood Wood is accessible to anyone who can walk without significant difficulty.

 

 

 

KE072 - Woodland Crafts 3- Betel Mania: Making a Traditional Wooden Mallet (Betel) From Tree to Tool.

Date: Wednesday week 21 (13 March)
Time: 12:00-16:00
Number of hours: 1x 4 hour session
Location: Canterbury campus
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

mallet

Betel Mania

Course outline

This is a field workshop in which students will make a betel (mallet) through a process of learning about and interacting with the construction materials. You will experience and understand the authentic traditional process of making, using materials from managed woodland.

Learning outcomes

You will learn about the nature of trees and timber growth and the best timbers for different uses, in particular for a mallet type tool.

You will select an appropriate piece of timber cut it to size, and learn how to form your timber into a usable betel.

 

You will need to wear old clothes and sturdy footwear.

The craft area in Brotherhood Wood is accessible to anyone who can walk without significant difficulty.

 

 

KE073 - Bleak House? Poor and Rich in Victorian England

bleak house

Bleak House?

Start date:
End date:
Time: 11:00 - 14:00
Number of hours: 3 hours
Employability Points: TBC
Location: Canterbury Campus

Course outline

The course comprises a half day in seminar and workshop form and is suitable for any student interested in social and economic history and/or 19th century English literature.

In recent years TV serialisations in particular have brought home the plight of the poor in the century-and-a-half before the introduction of pensions in 1908 and national insurance in 1911. Alongside these portrayals of the poor life derived from literature such as Dickens’ Bleak House, there has been a huge growth in the availability of materials which allow us to investigate aspects of historical poverty for ourselves. These include re-issues of classic works such as Street Life in London, with interviews, articles and photographs from 1876-77, and R. Seebohm Rowntree’s A Study of Town Life, from which we will discuss extracts. In response to works like this, charities such as the Waifs and Strays Society were set up, to save children from what was seen as a future life of crime and we will investigate their nature.
We will also consider the deep agricultural poverty which was one of the factors behind the New Poor Law of 1834, looking at an example of the establishment of one of the enormous Union workhouses in Sussex from contemporary letters, reports, memoranda and maps. Here we can learn about the lives of the inmates and the workers, the governor and his wife, the schoolteacher, nurse and porter, as well as exploring the attitudes of the wealthy ratepayers who funded poor relief.

 

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course, students will have:

    • A fuller understanding of the historical realities (or not) of the poverty of the later nineteenth century as depicted by Dickens
    • An enhanced knowledge of the social criticism, new laws and provision by charitable organisations which changed life for the poor by the early 20th century before the development of the ‘welfare state’.
  • Short extracts of texts will be supplied on this half-day school but in preparation you may like to familiarise yourself with Dickens’  Bleak House as the original book or the TV serialisation of 2005 starring Gillian Anderson (available as DVD).

 

KE075 - The Bystander Intervention Initiative

Dates and times:

There are 3 different workshop groups available. Please only sign up for one.

Wednesday 13:00 - 15:00

OR

Thursday 09:00 - 11:00

OR

Thursday 15:00-17:00

expect-respect

The Bystander Intervention Initiative


Number of hours: 10 hours (5x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury Campus

Course outline

The Bystander Intervention Initiative, is “an evidence-based educational programme for the prevention of sexual coercion and domestic abuse in university settings, through empowering students to act as prosocial citizens.”

The programme will be delivered in five workshops by experienced facilitators from Rising Sun, a domestic violence and abuse organisation working in Canterbury and the surrounding area. Each workshop will last approximately two hours. The workshops will include the following teaching methods:

  • PowerPoint
  • Audio visual resources
  • Scripted role plays
  • Group work, group discussions
  • Exercises
  • Quizzes
  • Handouts

You will be asked to complete an anonymous ‘Social norms’ questionnaire in the first session and will be asked to provide feedback at the end of the course. There will be no homework.

Please note that there are important ground rules to consider for this course, specifically around confidentiality and please also be aware that throughout the course the group will be discussing sensitive issues. The sessions are run by experienced Facilitators who can help and support the participants and the Wellbeing Team are also available for support, if needed.

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Understand what a ‘bystander’ is, form ideas about the types of situations which might call for a bystander intervention and become confident and motivated active bystanders.
    • Develop familiarity with intervention strategies and be safe and comfortable practising intervention behaviours
    • Understand why sexual violence and domestic violence is a problem in society and in student populations
    • Understand that individuals can often be mistaken about others’ beliefs and values
    • Recognise the links between sexist attitudes, discriminatory practices and gender based violence
    • Understand more detail about rape and sexual assault including rape ‘myths’, male rape and sexual assault, law definitions and issues around consent
    • Understand and recognise the features of domestic violence and abuse including honour based violence, social norms theory and recognition.

 

KE082 - KE085: Science & Society: Ethical Concerns in the Development of New Technologies

Dates:
Time: 15:00 - 16:30
Number of hours: 4x 1.5 hour sessions
Employability Points: 5 points maximum per session (Up to a maximum of 15 points) (Based on 100% attendance)

Dirty History

Science & Society (Pic: FreeImages.com/Stanciu Florin)

Course outline

Each session will last approximately 1.5 hours. You may attend as many or as few sessions as you wish - please sign up for each session that you wish to attend:

KE082: Energy: Production methods, climate change, environmental concerns.

KE083: Warfare: Beginning with the history of the use of weapons to resolve conflict, this session focuses on the role of scientists in developing weapons, including WMD, and surveillance methods. Would you be prepared to work in any of these areas and how much should the public know about what is going on behind the scenes for the protection of the nation? Please note that this is not a discussion that will address the political aspects of when or whether war is justified.

KE084: Biotechnology: Gene manipulation, GM foods, designer babies, bioethics considerations.

KE085: Artificial Intelligence and the future: There are rapid changes in computational techniques that permit huge amounts of data to be stored and processing speed to be much faster. These developments are already leading to huge changes in society through information retrieval, ‘big data’, robots, etc. What will the future hold for social interactions with intelligent machines? Open Forum (subject to demand during the session):  Your views on matters of concern covered in this and previous sessions.

 

Each session will involve an initial presentation of information and will be followed by group discussion around a number of specific questions followed by a ‘report back’ process leading to a more general discussion of the issues raised. The final session will also provide an open forum for your views and opinions, should there be demand for this.

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course you will be able to:

    • Understand how technological developments influence the choices made in society
    • Consider how scientific research provides the starting point for new technologies
    • Engage with discussions that involve different viewpoints on controversial issues
    • Analyse the way that society has been changed over recent years and to project these changes into a future context.

KE086 - Zak & Lottie: Tackling Online Radicalisation and Sexual Grooming

Zak and Lottie

Zak & Lottie: Tackling Online Radicalisation and Sexual Grooming

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 3 hours (1x 3 hour session)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum
(Based on 100% attendance)

Course outline

A standalone 3 hour workshop based on the Centre for Child Protection serious game simulations Zak, spotting the signs of radicalisation and Lottie, tackling online sexual grooming. There will be an introduction into grooming methods.

Students will then go through the simulations as a group with the opportunity for small group activities and self-reflection on their own internet usage and safety.

Please be aware that this course discusses difficult and sensitive issues relating to child protection. We would encourage you to seek appropriate support and advice if the course content raises any personal issues or causes you distress.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an increased awareness around the process of radicalisation and Grooming
  • Identify and discuss factors/indicators of radicalisation and Grooming
  • Consider aspects of internet safety
  • Self-reflect on their own and other behaviour
  • Understand where and to whom they should report their concerns on radicalisation, internet safety, grooming and exploitation
  • Identify some of the procedures in place to support individuals affected by these issues
  • Recognise factors attributed to the grooming process
  • Understand how to stay safe both on and offline
  • Identify and discuss  factors/indicators of online grooming and exploitation

 

KE087 - Screenwriting for non-writers: how to provide shape, voice and style to your creative ideas.

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 8 hours (2 x 4 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

screenwriting

Screen writing Photo credit

Sgerbic

Course outline

This course is designed to encourage writing for non-specialists, using storytelling and screenwriting as essential tools for further writing and creative pursuits

Through a two-phase lecture and workshop course, you will learn the fundamentals of storytelling and screenwriting and then apply these to your own creative ideas.

You will also be able to share and pitch your ideas.

No prior writing experience or screenwriting expertise required.

 

Learning outcomes

This course will :

  • encourage you to write for personal pleasure and instil confidence and purpose
  • develop your writing skills by teaching the principles of storytelling
  • teach you how to shape ideas into a tangible creative product (screenwriting).
  • teach you how to conceive, plan and write a screenplay after learning the creative and critical approaches to to storytelling for the screen
  • teach you to use personal or cultural experiences to generate storytelling potential, especially for the screen

 

 

KE088- Discover Chinese language and culture

Start date:
End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 5 x 2 hour sessions
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

chinese language and culture

Discover Chinese language and culture

Course outline

This course is for students who have studied Mandarin for at least one term.

You will discover Chinese culture through various topics, such as:

  • calligraphy and  classical Poems
  • traditional festivals
  • historical sights
  • film, drama and contemporary performing arts
  • authentic Chinese food and drink

In addition to the presentations and group discussions, you will participate in a variety of classroom activities to allow you to gain personal insights into living and travelling in China.

 

Learning outcomes

 

During this course, you will:

  • learn about Chinese culture and language.
  • practise calligraphy, ink painting and appreciate classic poems, modern films and performing arts
  • learn about the customs of the main Chinese festivals and enjoy the traditional celebratory activities through videos and games
  • use your Chinese language skills to deal with day-to-day situations, such as buying train/flight tickets, ordering food and drink and being a guest of a Chinese family

 

 

KE089 - Spanish for travel

Start date:
End date:
Time: 11:00 - 13:00
Number of hours: 5 x 2 hour sessions
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Spanish for travel

Course outline

 

This course is for students who are beginners or who have very little knowledge of Spanish.

You will learn key language and basic conversation skills through in-class practice based on real situations that may happen during a visit to a Spanish-speaking country.

There will also be a talk on Spanish culture.


One-two hours per week for self-study is required outside of the class, including homework and preparation.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you will:

  • have gained an introductory knowledge of Spain and its culture
  • know enough basic Spanish to deal with situations you may encounter when travelling in Spanish-speaking countries.

 

 

KE090 - Japanese for travel

Start date:
End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 5 x 2 hour sessions
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Japanese for travel

Course outline

This course is designed for students who have never studied Japanese or have a very little knowledge of Japanese. You will gain basic conversation skills through in-class practice based on real situations that may happen during a visit to Japan. A Japanese culture talk will be also presented in the course. The topic in each lesson will be the following:

  • Lesson 1 – Greetings & introducing yourself
  • Lesson 2 – Shopping in a convenience store
  • Lesson 3 – Ordering in a restaurant
  • Lesson 4 – Sightseeing
  • Lesson 5 – Asking questions in a railway station

One-two hours per week for self-study is required outside of the class, including homework and preparation.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you will:

  • have gained an introductory knowledge of Japan and its culture
  • know enought basic Japanese to deal with situations you may encounter when travelling in Japan, from having to provide personal information, to asking a price of food and drink, ordering in a restaurant, asking directions and buying a train ticket at a station.
  • understand the Japanese writing/reading system.

 

 

KE091 - Arabic for travelling in Egypt

Start date:
End date:

 


Time: 11:00 - 13:00
Number of hours: 5 x 2 hour sessions
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Arabic for travelling in Egypt

Course outline

This course is designed for students who have never studied Arabic or have a very little knowledge of Arabic.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you will:

  • have gained an introductory knowledge of Egypt and its culture
  • know enough basic Arabic to deal with situations you may encounter when traveling in Egypt and throughout the Middle East, from having to provide personal information, to asking a price of food and drink, ordering in a restaurant, asking directions and buying a train ticket at a station using colloquial Egyptian dialect
  • understand the Arabic writing/reading system

 

 

KE092 - "A weekend in France": Beginners' French

Start date:
End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 5 x 2 hour sessions
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

A weekend in France: Beginners' French

Course outline

This course is for beginners and is structured around the theme of a weekend in France, focusing on listening, reading and speaking skills.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course you will :

  • have a basic knowledge of France and its culture
  • know enough French to deal with situations you may encounter when travelling to France for a short stay and;
    • be able to provide personal information, find your way around, ask for special features in your accommodation or at meal time and buy presents

 

 

 

KE093 - Introduction to the Solar System

Course dates:
Times:
Number of hours: 7 hours
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (based on 100% attendance)

Course outline

This course will be given in the form of six individual Lectures with one additional Workshop.
Independent learning is not required but it will be encouraged.


Learn about the Solar System, from the formation of the Sun and Stars and the development of the major bodies of the solar system including, planets, moons, asteroids, comets and meteorites. This course will discuss the past and future exploration of the solar system and the search for life beyond Earth.
The following lectures will form the basis of the course:
1: Formation of the Solar System (1 Hour)
2: Stars and our own Sun (1 Hour)
3: Exploration of the Solar System (1 Hour)
4: The Planets! (1 Hour)
5: Moons, Asteroids and Comets – Including a Meteorite Workshop (2 hours)
6: Search for Life!

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you should be able to;

  • know about the formation of the main bodies of the Solar System
  • know about current and future space missions set to explore more about the Solar System
  • discuss ideas and application for searching for life away from Earth

 

 

 

KE094 - Who are you? Improving your prospects by knowing your strengths (for postgrad students only)

Start date:
End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 13 hours (2 x 6.5 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 60 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

who are you

Who are you?

Course outline

(Please note: this course is for postgraduate students only - this course takes place in the final week of the Christmas vacation)

This two-day workshop is designed to help you to develop your professional and personal effectiveness by enhancing your self-awareness, and awareness of others. The workshop will be entirely activity-based and will be an opportunity to develop the following transferable skills: working with others – teamwork and collaboration; networking; negotiation; problem solving and critical thinking; communication and presentation.

Day 1

0930-0945

Arrival and registration

Coffee/tea

 

0945-1000

Welcome

 

 

1000-1100

Building bridges

A practical icebreaker activity

 

1100-1330

MBTI

An intro. to Myers-Briggs personality types.

 

1330-1400

Lunch

 

 

1400-1600

Not for Profit

Adventures in the third-sector

 

1600-1630

End of day debrief

 

Day 2

0930-0945

Arrival

Coffee/tea

 

0945-1000

Welcome

 

 

1000-1225

Flooded Out

Negotiation, compromise and communication.

 

1230-1315

Lunch

 

 

1315-1445

Team challenge

Teamwork, competition and time management.

 

1445-1500

Break

 

 

1500-1545

End of course debrief

Reflection & future planning.

 

1545-1600

Close

 

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Better understand how you and other people perceive the world and make decisions
  • Recognise the strengths that you and others bring to a team
  • Better understand the dynamics of working with other people
  • Better understand how their values shape your decision making

KE095 - Communicate with Confidence

Dates:
Time: 13:00-16:00
Number of hours: 6 hours (2x 3 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

communicate

Communicate with Confidence

Course outline

By participating in this interactive workshop you will learn how to communicate clearly and confidently even when faced with challenging situations.  Through group work and self-reflection activities we will cover how your preferred communication style impacts your relationship with others, how to speak so that others listen and how to really listen to others.  We will practice various techniques to be able to have constructive conversations with others rather than avoiding them or having a confrontation.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

    • Recognise various communication styles and respond appropriately
    • Identify their own preferred communication style and its impact on others
    • Enhance communication with others using effective listening skills
    • Give and receive feedback (compliments and criticisms) in a constructive manner
    • Communicate effectively with others instead of arguing or avoiding them
    • Deal confidently with other people’s expectations and demands (without feeling anxious or guilty)

KE096 - Sharpen your writing skills for work

Start date:
End date:
Time: 13:00-16:00
Number of hours: 6 hours (3x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

writing skills

Sharpen your writing skills for work

Course outline

Graduate recruiters put communication skills top of the list. Sadly for them, about 20 per cent of graduates’ English skills are not up to scratch for the workplace.

Employers look for confident, professional communicators. They want people who write clearly, concisely and effectively. Whether you’re emailing a colleague or drafting the annual report, your writing has to be accurate, and make things happen.

This practical workshop course will help you make your words count. We’ll pin down the function of different kinds of writing. We’ll identify who we’re writing for. We’ll learn about tone, content and structure. We’ll include a scattering of grammar and punctuation so you’ll avoid the worst pitfalls.

Above all, we’ll write. We’ll write emails, letters, web content, information and reports so no matter what an employer asks you to do, you’re ready.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Understand what writing skills employers look for
  • Understand how to write to make things happen
  • Have a toolkit for writing and punctuating accurately
  • Know about writing appropriately in different work situations
  • Have templates for key professional writing tasks
  • Have a toolkit for approaching any piece of writing, from email to annual reports

     

    This course is full.

 

KE097 - Meditation for study, work and life

Date:
Time: 10:00-13:00
Number of hours: 3 hours (single session)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

meditation

Meditation for study, work and life

Course outline

This is an experience-focused course aimed at introducing meditative techniques with practical application and benefits in everyday life. It provides an introduction to meditative practices drawing from Mindfulness (awareness in the moment), Yogic and Taoist approaches examining background, principles and their application to support specific work and personal goals.

The course considers the roots of contemporary interest in meditative practices such as mindfulness as people look for coping methods to deal with increasing change in work, life and society as well as primal drives to find happiness and fulfilment.

Starting with an outline of the historic, religious and philosophic background of meditation we will consider the development and place of meditative practices both new and old.
From this vantage point you may start to reflect on the relevance of meditation to your own situation.

Basic principles and aims of meditation will then be examined highlighting the key attributes of meditation as a low-cost, proven, effective method for training the mind, coping with stress and helping us to achieve goals in a systematic way.

The bulk of the course is a practical and pragmatic focus on three meditative approaches:

  • Mindfulness
  • Movement
  • Taoist

In each sub-category you will be taken through the background, context and key application of each approach to work and life before being guided through a representative practise within that methodology.

A round-up session will then consider students' experiences, advice on continued practise and further developments in the field such as pain-management.

Please wear shoes with flexible soles and comfortable clothes to keep warm while sitting meditating and to allow mobility.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Understand the potential of meditation for study, work and life
  • Illustrate some of the roots and purposes of meditative practise
  • Identify basic principles of meditation and how they are applied
  • Learn contemplative skills of mindfulness, focus, and personal transformation
  • Pragmatically apply a toolkit of three meditative approaches to suit your needs

KE101 - Music for creatives: Come out - Words, music and rythm

Start date:

End date:
Time: 11:00 - 16:30 (includes 30min break)
Number of hours: 15 hours
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

musical-notes

Music for creatives: Come out-Words, music and rythm

Course outline

This course will interest anyone fascinated with the way language and music can connect with the emotions.  Using examples that include Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana, the Philip Glass operas Einstein on the Beach and Satyagraha, Steve Reich’s Come Out and the William Walton/Edith Sitwell collaboration Façade, as well as work by Claudio Monteverdi and the Florentine Camerata, a range of topics will be explored that include poetry, word painting, language and translation, the role of chorus and soliloquy, and puzzles

Learning outcomes

This course will enable you to:

  • Examine the secrets of music that go beyond technique
  • Address the ability of music to tap into primal instincts and their connection to high level structured musical thought
  • Develop an understanding of how language and music can evoke, awaken and manipulate emotions across a wide and diverse range of musical styles, historical periods and cultures

KE104 - Student Mentoring at University (Canterbury Campus OR Medway Campus)

Dates:

Number of hours: 12 hours (12x 1 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 60 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus OR Medway Campus

mentoring at university

Student Mentoring at University

This course will provide an understanding of mentoring in an academic setting and a recognition of how the skills gained can be applied in the workplace.  For those already mentoring on the Academic Peer Mentoring Scheme, the course will enhance and extend the skills learned in training, and those new to mentoring will develop an understanding of the core elements of how to support their peers.

Course outline

Week 1: Introduction to mentoring
Week 2: Becoming a reflective mentor
Week 3: Mentors' characteristics
Week 4: Learning styles and mentoring
Week 5: Mentoring and academic support
Week 6: Mid-year Review
Week 7: Equality and diversity
Week 8: Cross cultural communication
Week 9: Guest speaker 1 Mental Health and Wellbeing at Kent
Week 10: Guest speaker 2 Careers & employability: building your CV
Week 11: Research on Mentoring
Week 12: Evaluating mentoring - presentations

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Understand the role of mentoring at university
  • Communicate effectively with other students face to face and via email
  • Guide small groups of students in their learning and facilitate discussion
  • Work effectively as part of a small team
  • Reflect on the skills of mentoring such as communication, problem solving, team work and leadership

This course will be running at both our Canterbury and Medway campuses. Please ensure you sign up for the correct course.

This course has now started, signups are closed.

 

KE105 - Beginners' Presentations with Microsoft PowerPoint

Dates and times:
Number of hours: 1 hour
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

MS-PowerPoint

Beginners' Presentations with Microsoft PowerPoint

Course outline

This is a practical computing session covering:

  • How to prepare a Presentation from scratch in Microsoft PowerPoint
  • How to use themes, slide layouts and tools to create a consistent presentation
  • How to apply a variety of formatting features
  • How to set up a slide show and apply slide transitions

You will be provided with a workbook should you wish to continue exploring in your own time.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Use presentation fundamentals
  • Create new and work with existing presentations
  • Use themes and pre-defined presentations
  • Insert and work with different slide layouts
  • Use a variety of formatting tools
  • Use different PowerPoint objects, e.g. Pictures, Charts, Shapes
  • Set up a slide show
  • Apply slide transitions

 

KE106 - Preparing Essays with Microsoft Word

Dates:
Times: 11:00 - 12:00
Number of hours: 1
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

Word

Preparing Essays with Microsoft Word

 

Course outline

This is a single practical computing session covering:

  • How to prepare an essay in Microsoft Word using word-processing features and safely save files to the Kent network.
  • How to apply a variety of formatting features to enhance essays and use some automatic formatting features to save time
  • How to review and prepare your essay for printing

You will be provided with a workbook should you wish to continue exploring in your own time.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Use word processing fundamentals
  • Create new and work with existing documents
  • Edit text and arrange text easily
  • Apply formatting to text and paragraphs
  • Use editing tools to find and replace text
  • Use the spell checker
  • Understand headers and footers
  • Change page layout options

 

KE107 - Improving Presentations with Microsoft PowerPoint

Dates and times: Several sessions available. Please see SDS for available dates and times: please only choose one.

Number of hours: 2
Employability Points: 10 points
Location: Canterbury campus

improving-presentations

Improving Presentations with MS PowerPoint

 

Course outline

This is a single practical computing session covering:

  • How to use slide masters and templates to create a consistent presentation globally update
  • How to work with objects and images to add interest to a presentation
  • How to insert charts and diagrams to display data
  • How to link and embed other objects, e.g. Word document, Excel worksheet
  • How to use navigation features using custom shows, hyperlinks, action buttons
  • How to use animation and timing for a slide show
  • How to record a narration and finalise a presentation
  • How to use collaboration tools e.g. comments

You will be provided with a workbook should you wish to continue exploring in your own time.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Use advanced presentation features
  • Use slide masters and templates
  • Use Linking and Embedding tools
  • Use Animation and timing for slide shows
  • Work with Objects and Images
  • Improve navigation
  • Finalise a presentation

KE108 - Beginners' Spreadsheets with Microsoft Excel

Dates:
Times: 15:00-16:00
Number of hours: 1
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

word

Beginners' Spreadsheets with Microsoft Excel

 

Course outline

This is a single practical computing session covering:

  • How to prepare a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel
  • How to create simple formulae and use basic built-in functions
  • How to apply a variety of formatting features and set print options
  • How to prepare a worksheet for printing

You will be provided with a workbook should you wish to continue exploring in your own time.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Use spreadsheet fundamentals
  • Create new and work with existing spreadsheets
  • Create simple formulae
  • Format the display of cells
  • Edit, copy and move cells
  • Set printing options and preview
  • Use basic functions

KE109 - Preparing Dissertations or Extended Assignments with Microsoft Word

Dates and Times:
Number of hours: 1.5
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

word

Preparing Dissertations or Extended Assignments with Microsoft Word

 

Course outline

This is a single practical computing session covering:

  • How to prepare a dissertation or extended assignment in Microsoft Word using many of the advanced features
  • How to apply and modify styles to create consistent looking documents and enables the creation of a table of contents
  • How to use referencing tools including footnotes, endnotes and captions
  • How to create tables of figures
  • How to divide your documents into sections and control page numbering
  • How to use different headers and footers across document sections

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Produce professional looking documents
  • Apply and modify styles
  • Create tables of contents
  • Use referencing tools including footnotes, endnotes and captions
  • Create tables of figures
  • Work with sections

You will be provided with a workbook should you wish to continue exploring in your own time.

KE110 - Talking Cultures: Enhancing cultural awareness to avoid ethnocentrism and cultural bias

Course dates:
Times: Wednesdays, 13:00- 15:00
Number of hours: Single two -hour session
Employability Points: TBC

employment

Talking Cultures

Course outline

Talking Cultures modules tackle the notion of intercultural communication and aim to develop students' engagement and integration with their fellow classmates within a contemporary internationalised classroom. The modules will help to increase awareness of cultural differences and will explore cultural heritage, prejudices and stereotypes.


KE110 looks at problems that can occur during spoken discourse and social interaction and focuses on strategies to avoid them

Learning outcomes

Students successfully completing this module will:

  • have a greater understanding of the way people communicate  within and across social groups
  • have a greater understanding of their own culture and themselves
  • have an awareness of ethnocentrism
  • have an awareness of cultural bias
  • learn about other cultures
  • develop a sensitivity to the social, cultural and political issues which surround language

KE111 - Talking Cultures: Intercultural communication

Course dates:
Times: Wednesdays, 13:00- 15:00
Number of hours: Single two -hour session
Employability Points: TBC

employment

Talking Cultures

Course outline

Talking Cultures modules tackle the notion of intercultural communication and aim to develop students' engagement and integration with their fellow classmates within a contemporary internationalised classroom. The modules will help to increase awareness of cultural differences and will explore cultural heritage, prejudices and stereotypes.

 

KE111 looks at creating a greater understanding of the factors to consider when communicating with people from different cultures and guides you on strategies you can use.

Learning outcomes

Students successfully completing this module will:

  • have a greater understanding of the way people communicate  within and across social groups
  • have a greater understanding of their own culture and themselves
  • have an awareness of ethnocentrism
  • have an awareness of cultural bias
  • learn about other cultures
  • develop a sensitivity to the social, cultural and political issues which surround language

 

KE112 - Talking Cultures: Cultural knowledge and identity

Course dates:
Times: Wednesdays, 14:00- 16:00
Number of hours: Single two -hour session
Employability Points: TBC

employment

Talking Cultures

Course outline

Talking Cultures modules tackle the notion of intercultural communication and aim to develop students' engagement and integration with their fellow classmates within a contemporary internationalised classroom. The modules will help to increase awareness of cultural differences and will explore cultural heritage, prejudices and stereotypes.

 

KE112 looks at cultures, people, nations and behaviours , with an emphasis on ways to compare and contrast cultures, identify fundamental differences between cultures and the notion of cross-cultural understanding.

Learning outcomes

Students successfully completing this module will:

  • have a greater understanding of the way people communicate  within and across social groups
  • have a greater understanding of their own culture and themselves
  • have an awareness of ethnocentrism
  • have an awareness of cultural bias
  • learn about other cultures
  • develop a sensitivity to the social, cultural and political issues which surround language

 

KE113 - Business Start-Up Workshops - Canterbury Campus

Date:
Time: 15:00-17:00
Number of hours: 10 (5 x 2 hr sessions)
Employability Points: 50 points maximum (based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

busines-start-up

Business Start-Up Workshops

Course outline

Kent Invicta Chamber of Commerce, who have been advising and guiding individuals through the process of how to start and run a successful business for years, will run five 2 hour workshops spread over five weeks. Delivered in group sessions with like-minded students, you will benefit from a series of intensive workshops that will cover the following topics:

  • Generating a business idea,
  • Testing a business idea
  • Developing marketing research
  • Understanding sales processes
  • Pricing
  • Planning cash flow
  • Knowing your tax, insurance and VAT requirements
  • Understanding the elements of a business plan

Workshop 1: 'The Beginning'

  • Introductions
  • Ideas Generations
  • Group Task and Presentations
  • Guest Key Note Speaker

Workshop 2: 'What do you need?'

  • Legal
  • Insurance
  • Tax
  • Regulatory
  • Landlord
  • Operational
  • Staff
  • Timetables
  • Bookkeeping/records
  • Guest Key Note Speaker

Workshop 3: 'Sales and Marketing'

  • PESTEL analysis
  • Strengths and weaknesses
  • Who is the customer?
  • Who will sell and how?
  • Buying drivers
  • S&M template
  • Intellectual property rights - identifying and defending
  • Guest Key Note Speaker

Workshop 4: 'Finance, Funding, Tax and Insurances'

  • Personal budget
  • Cash flow and P&L objectives
  • Start-up and running costs
  • Funding help
  • Guest Key Note Speaker
  • Different business structures
  • Accruing for tax, different types
  • Your liabilities – the risks
  • Insurances:
    • Personal Insurance
    • Public Liability
    • Business
    • Professional associations
    • Critical person
    • Employers

Workshop 5: 'The Business Plan'

  • Why bother, who is it for?
  • KICC template
  • Elements of the business plan
  • Guest Key Note Speaker

Learning outcomes

The workshops have been structured so that all students who are interested in freelancing or being
self-employed can feel confident that they’ll walk away with valuable information. Whether you
want to start a business after graduation, or use freelancing as a tool to build a portfolio, these workshops
are the right starting point.
By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Pitch a business idea
  • Understand the finances, legalities and processes for starting up a business
  • Identify a suitable structure for a business plan

 

KE113 - Business Start-Up Workshops - Medway Campus

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 10 (5 x 2 hr sessions)
Employability Points: 50 points maximum (based on 100% attendance)
Location: Medway campus

busines-start-up

Business Start-Up Workshops

Course outline

Kent Invicta Chamber of Commerce, who have been advising and guiding individuals through the process of how to start and run a successful business for years, will run five 2 hour workshops spread over five weeks. Delivered in group sessions with like-minded students, you will benefit from a series of intensive workshops that will cover the following topics:

  • Generating a business idea,
  • Testing a business idea
  • Developing marketing research
  • Understanding sales processes
  • Pricing
  • Planning cash flow
  • Knowing your tax, insurance and VAT requirements
  • Understanding the elements of a business plan

Workshop 1: 'The Beginning'

  • Introductions
  • Ideas Generations
  • Group Task and Presentations
  • Guest Key Note Speaker

Workshop 2: 'What do you need?'

  • Legal
  • Insurance
  • Tax
  • Regulatory
  • Landlord
  • Operational
  • Staff
  • Timetables
  • Bookkeeping/records
  • Guest Key Note Speaker

Workshop 3: 'Sales and Marketing'

  • PESTEL analysis
  • Strengths and weaknesses
  • Who is the customer?
  • Who will sell and how?
  • Buying drivers
  • S&M template
  • Intellectual property rights - identifying and defending
  • Guest Key Note Speaker

Workshop 4: 'Finance, Funding, Tax and Insurances'

  • Personal budget
  • Cash flow and P&L objectives
  • Start-up and running costs
  • Funding help
  • Guest Key Note Speaker
  • Different business structures
  • Accruing for tax, different types
  • Your liabilities – the risks
  • Insurances:
    • Personal Insurance
    • Public Liability
    • Business
    • Professional associations
    • Critical person
    • Employers

Workshop 5: 'The Business Plan'

  • Why bother, who is it for?
  • KICC template
  • Elements of the business plan
  • Guest Key Note Speaker

Learning outcomes

The workshops have been structured so that all students who are interested in freelancing or being self-employed can feel confident that they’ll walk away with valuable information. Whether you want to start a business after graduation, or use freelancing as a tool to build a portfolio, these workshops are the right starting point.
By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Pitch a business idea
  • Understand the finances, legalities and processes for starting up a business
  • Identify a suitable structure for a business plan

KE114 - Woodland crafts: origins and making of Christmas wreaths

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 4 hours
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (based on 100% attendance)

christmas-wreath

Origins and making of Christmas wreaths

Course outline

This course will comprise of a field workshop in which you will be introduced to the history and practice of Christmas wreath making – which reveals its pagan origins and Christian history. You will source the appropriate materials and make a wreath to take home (to ward off evil spirits etc. during the festive season)

Learning outcomes

This course will enable you to:

  • understand the historical origins (pagan and Christian) of the Christmas wreath – and the associated mythology
  • use the appropriate materials and tools correctly and safely to make your own Christmas wreath

 

KE115 - Canterbury Tales? Life in London and Kent in the Middle Ages

Dates: Wednesday week 19 (27 February)
Times: 11:00-17:00
Number of hours: 6 hours
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

mentoring at university

Canterbury Tales?

 

Course outline

Did Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and other literature accurately reflect what was life like in the later fourteenth century, a period of great social, economic and cultural change following the huge loss of population from the Black Death. We will investigate the ways in which Chaucer made the Pilgrim’s Way through Kent the framework of his tales and how he sited some of his work around Canterbury. Chaucer’s life as a public servant in a number of roles is well documented and this opens up for us both his career and his day-to-day life. We will explore the streets, port, riverside and buildings of the city of London which Chaucer knew so well, and the members of the royal court, the merchants, citizens and clerks of London amongst whom he lived and moved. These people formed the primary readership or audience of the works of Chaucer and other writers of the later Middle Ages.  We will compare extracts from his writings with a small, varied selection of political, moralising and chronicle works.

This study day (6 hours) comprises three sessions using short informal lectures, seminar and workshop-style teaching.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • more fully appreciate the links between Chaucer’s work and the city and county where you are studying
  • understand a most important medieval text in its wider cultural social and economic context
  • possess extended knowledge of some historical sources for further reading and research on the subject

KE116 - Introduction to Modern Art

Start date:

intro-to-modern art

Introduction to Modern Art

By Mika58 - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0,


Time:
Number of hours: 3 hours
Employability Points: 10 points (Based on 100% attendance)

Course outline

This course is suitable for beginners with no prior knowledge. It will provide a sound art historical introduction to “Modern Art” and therefore familiarize students with important examples of architecture, sculpture, photography and painting. The seminar will introduce you to major modern artists from Post-Impressionism to Photorealism.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course you will be able to identify:

  • stylistic elements of Modern Art
  • mayor artists of Modern Art
  • important examples of architecture, sculpture and painting of Modern Art

 

 

 

 

KE117 - Art in Context

Start date:

art_in_context

Art in Context

By Eduard Hau

End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 6 hours
Employability Points: 15 points (Based on 100% attendance)

Course outline

This course is for everyone who has an admiration for art and an interest in art history.

Students will learn how to “formally” assess an art work by investigating composition techniques, looking closely at lines, shapes, colours and tones. You will learn how to look at and understand an art work by analysing how it works, what its art historical elements are and how they relate to each other.

In order to extend our understanding of an artwork we also need some background information about the historical and maybe political circumstances in which it was produced, biographical details about the artist, technical information about the material that was used and the method with which it was produced. Therefore we will investigate the various relevant contexts in which an artwork needs to be seen. The thinking here is that in order to understand and appreciate art, we have to know something about how, why, when and where the art work was produced.

The aim of the course is that students learn to judge an art work by appearance, are able to access its meaning and its art historical context and are able to make the most of their next museum visits.

Additional information

  • This course is suitable for beginners with no prior knowledge.
  • This course allows you to spend time exploring a subject for interest, among like-minded people, without formal assessment.
  • There may be optional discussion activities during the course. 

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:

  • “formally” assess an art work by investigating composition techniques, looking closely at lines, shapes, colours and tones.
  •  look at and understand an art work by analysing how it works, what its art historical elements are and how they relate to each other.
  • analyse background information about the historical and maybe political circumstances in which the art work was produced,
  • investigate biographical details about the artist, technical information about the material that was used and the method with which it was produced.

You will be:

  • familiarized with basic art history and theories
  • acquainted with mayor artists and styles
  • provided with a sound art historical overview

 

KE122 - Digital Photography

Dates: Every Wednesday during weeks 19-23
Time: 14:00-17:00
Number of hours: 10 hours (5x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 25 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersDigital Photography

Course outline

Taught by professional photographer, Olly Knight, this course is suitable for beginners and those who want to improve their digital photography skills.

The course focuses on photographing people rather than landscape photography. You will need your own digital SLR or bridge camera.

Session 1:

  • Intro “A Passion for Photography” (lecture)
  • What the Camera Settings Mean (lecture)
  • Using those settings on Manual Mode (workshop- out and about practicing)

Session 2:

  • “How to find the best light” (lecture)
  • Go out and find good light sources (workshop)
  • Share examples and give encouragement/ critique (workshop)

Session 3:

  • “Composition” (lecture)
  • Group work going around the uni looking at buildings/ people (workshop)
  • Share examples and give encouragement/ critique (workshop)

Session 4:

  • “How to capture moments” (lecture)
  • Street Photography on campus (workshop)
  • Share work and give encouragement/ critique (workshop)

Session 5:

  • Excursion to Canterbury City Centre

Learning outcomes

This course will enable you to:

  • Use your digital SLR camera on manual mode
  • Find the best light for your subject
  • Understand how to get the best composition for your photographs
  • Capture moments using a photojournalistic approach

 

KE123 - Introduction to modern Greek language and culture

Course dates:
Times:
Number of hours: 10 hours (5 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 25 points maximum, (based on 100% attendance).

Greek flag

Introduction to modern Greek language and culture

Course outline

  • The course will include small group discussion and interactive tasks; use of some online resources to aid listening and writing skills and to introduce aspects of cultural, the possibility of part of one or two sessions devoted to focused IT activities; specifically prepared printed materials to help support writing and reading language skills
  • Students should try to briefly revise what has been covered each week to help them build on their skills in the session following
  • Independent revision of materials covered should take up to one hour a week. Further practice materials will be available on request but are not essential

The course is intended for students with little or no previous knowledge of Greek language or culture.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Understand the Greek Alphabet
  • Read and pronounce a range of simple key words
  • Engage in some basic everyday communication
  • Have some understanding of key traditions and the Greek way of life
  • Possess some useful skills/knowledge to apply when visiting Greece

 

KE124 - British Sign Language and deaf culture

Start date:
End date:
Time:
Number of hours: 12 hours - 8 x 1.5 hour sessions
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

BSL

British Sign Language

Photo: Jeremy Segrott from Cardiff, Wales, UK [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Course outline

This course, led by a professional interpreter, will help you break the communication barrier you may feel exists when meeting deaf people. Through a variety of workshops and interactive tasks, attendees will learn communication tactics, including basic British Sign Language (BSL) in order to confidently connect with deaf people. To set these communication techniques within a specific context, we will also explore deaf culture.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Use basic communication tactics with deaf people
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of deaf culture
  • Use basic BSL including items such as the alphabet, everyday terms and general personal introductions
  • Understand basic BSL through song and video

 

 

 

KE125 - Advanced Spreadsheets 1: Lookup Functions in Microsoft Excel

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1 hour
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

Please note: you will require a good working knowledge of Microsoft Excel for this workshop

excel

Advanced Spreadsheets 1 Microsoft Excel

Course outline

This is a single practical computing session covering Lookup Functions in Microsoft Excel, including:

  • How to create a lookup table in Microsoft Excel
  • How to use vertical and horizontal lookup functions
  • How to populate lists using lookups

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Use vertical and horizontal lookup functions
  • Create lookup tables
  • Confidently use lookups to populate lists

You will be provided with a handout.

This course has already started.

KE126 - Advanced Spreadsheets 2: Sorting and Filtering Lists in Microsoft Excel

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1 hour
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

 

Please note: you will require a good working knowledge of Microsoft Excel for this workshop

excel

Advanced Spreadsheets 2 Microsoft Excel

 

Course outline

This is a single practical computing session covering sorting and filtering lists in Microsoft Excel, including:

  • How to sort a list safely
  • How to filter information in a list
  • How to filter using an advanced tool to select multiple data

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Use basic Sorting and Filtering tools
  • Use an advanced filter to pick out specific data

 

KE127 - Advanced Spreadsheets 3: Pivot Tables in Microsoft Excel

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1 hour
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

Please note: you will require a good working knowledge of Microsoft Excel for this workshop

excel

Advanced Spreadsheets 3 Microsoft Excel

Course outline

This is a single practical computing session covering Pivot Tables in Microsoft Excel, including:

  • How to create a Pivot Table in MS Excel
  • How to filter a Pivot Table
  • How to filter and group data in Pivot Tables
  • How to create a Pivot Chart

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Create a Pivot Table
  • Format Pivot Tables
  • Filter Pivot Tables
  • Group data in Pivot Tables
  • Create Pivot Charts

You will be provided with a handout.

 

KE128, KE129,KE130, KE131 - Big Ideas: An Introduction to Philosophy

Dates

These are four stand alone workshop sessions. Please choose the workshops you would like to attend.

KE128: Scepticism: Wednesday week
KE129: The Self: Wednesday week
KE130: Pleasure: Wednesday week
KE131: God: Wednesday week

Time:
Number of hours: 3 hours per workshop
Employability Points: 10 points per workshop (Based on 100% attendance)

descartes

Big Ideas

Course outline

The course consists of four three hour sessions. These will include a range of teaching and learning methods including short lectures, class discussion, pair and group work and short group/or individual presentations.

You will be given suggested readings to complete in preparation for the classes of  about an hour per week, so a total of 4 hours altogether.

KE128 Scepticism Ancient and Modern. Can we know anything? We will discuss the use of sceptical arguments from Zeno and Pyrrho to Descartes and Hume and assess different attempts to meet the sceptical challenge.

KE129 The Self. Are we anything more than purely material beings?  We will assess the relative merits of dualist and materialist accounts of the person from Plato and Epicurus through to Descartes and contemporary materialism.

 KE130 Pleasure. Is pleasure good?  The role of pleasure in moral thinking from the hedonism of Epicurus to Utilitarianism. We will assess whether pleasure or happiness is relevant to moral decision making and the good life.

 KE131 God. Does God exist? The use of reason in efforts to assess the likelihood that there is a God from Aristotle to Richard Dawkins. We will examine the design and cosmological arguments with a focus on whether the scientific evidence can be used to support the case for theism.

Learning outcomes

This course will enable you to:

  • Analyse and explain certain key ideas within the western philosophical tradition.
  • Trace the development and influence of these ideas from their origins in Ancient Greece and up to the present day.
  • Evaluate the philosophical arguments relating to these ideas.

 

KE132 - Kent Global Passport (KGP)

Start date:
Time:
Number of hours: 3 hours
Employability Points: 35 points maximum (5 points for each section of the Passport you complete and a total of 35 points if you complete all 6 sections. You must submit your KGP to earn the points.)

Kent Global Passport

Kent Global Passport

 

Course outline

Fast-track your Kent Global Passport (KGP) with a three-hour workshop by Dr Anthony Manning, Dean for Internationalisation.

You will need to bring your own tablet, laptop or phone so you can navigate the online Kent Global Passport as Dr Manning presents it.

The workshop will help you to think about and record in your Kent Global Passport international experiences gained during your time at Kent.

 

If you submit your KGP you will be in with a chance of winning one of three £100 vouchers.

See the Kent Global Passport page for more details and prize draw conditions.

 

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:

  • reflect upon the full range of academic and co-curricular international experiences that you have had at the University of Kent
  • consider sources of international skills and expertise developed through:
    • studying
    • co-curricular and social activity
    • working or volunteering
    • media, films, music and popular culture
    • languages, international communications and travel
  • identify international experiences in your everyday life, study and work which you can refer to or build on in your future life, study or job applications

 

KE133 Global Learning Online (GLO) with Japan - Migration/Free Trade in Europe and Japan

Course dates:
Times: These will be negotiated depending on which students take the course
Number of hours: 20 hours (12 hours contact time +8 hours independent study)
Employability Points: 30 points (based on completion of the course and final presentation)

 

GLO

Global Learning Online

Course outline

GLO introduces you to cross-cultural learning via the Internet and other technology. It complements other overseas study options and gives you a chance to communicate and study online with students in Japan.

Joint Task
Option 1:  Migration in Europe and Japan
Possible task: How does the type of migration you selected for this task (e.g. asylum seekers, low-skilled labourers, high-skilled migrants) impact Japan and European counties? What could be done to improve the situation for both
migrants and host countries?

Option 2: Free trade in Europe and Japan
Possible task: What are the benefits and risks of free trade, such as EPA, between Japan and the EU? What does
access to the EU's single market mean, and how could the single market be developed further?


  • Pre- Meeting

Colleagues at each institution meet with selected students in order to brief them on the project and to prepare them for meeting one.

  • Stage 1

Both groups of students meet via Skype and provide a self-introduction and details of areas of study and interests. In this meeting students are also linked with their collaborative partner(s) with whom they will engage for the shared task. The task is explained by staff members from both institutions.

  • Stage 1 debrief & Prep for Stage 2

Staff at each institution debrief with their respective group of students and check that they are aware of the structure of the project and the requirements for the next meetings/stages.

  • Stage 2

Allocated pairs/groups meet via Skype to start to discuss the task and to focus on the required work. It is suggested that there may be three meetings of this type but pairs/groups may decide to increase this if necessary. In addition to Skype, the pairs/groups may choose to communicate via email or other electronic platforms.

  • Stage 2 debrief

Staff at the respective institutions meet with participants to check and motivate their progress during Stage 2 and to prepare for Stages 3 and 4.

  • Stage 3

This is a final meeting between pairs/groups of students to finish off the task and to build in any suggestions made from the previous meeting. After this meeting the task is submitted.

  • Final prep for Stage 4

Staff meet with the groups of students at each institution to check their preparations for the final presentations.

  • Stage 4 - Final presentations

Students present either a shared document which represents their achievement of the task or present a series of powerpoint slides. This meeting is attended by all students and both staff members via Skype.

The course will take the form of a series of workshops and paired activities.  Some of these will be physical meetings and others will involve pair or group work via skype or Video Conference.

Learning outcomes

This course will:

  • deepen your understanding and international awareness of an area of study
  • teach you how academic problems or tasks can be approached from different cultural perspectives
  • introduce you to learning and alternative cultural norms or expectations through working with students from another country
  • allow you to use electronic resources to communicate and work collaboratively with students overseas in order to complete a series of tasks and present findings
  • enhance your time management and organisation skills
  • introduce you to the concept of the international classroom and learning environment
  • help you develop presentation, team and group work skills
  • enhance your international verbal and written communication skills

 

KE133 Global Learning Online (GLO) with Hong Kong- Migration

Course dates:
Times: These will be negotiated depending on which students take the course
Number of hours: 20 hours (12 hours contact time +8 hours independent study)
Employability Points: 30 points (based on completion of the course and final presentation)

 

GLO

Global Learning Online

Course outline

GLO introduces you to cross-cultural learning via the Internet and other technology. It complements other overseas study options and gives you a chance to communicate and study online with students in Hong Kong.

Joint Task
Identify ways in which migration has impacted on your local city and environment. Consider both cultural and economic consequences and the different ways in which people are affected. Devise a series of recommendations which leaders in your region could implement in order to maximise possible benefits from migration in future.


  • Pre- Meeting

Colleagues at each institution meet with selected students in order to brief them on the project and to prepare them for meeting one.

  • Stage 1

Both groups of students meet via Skype and provide a self-introduction and details of areas of study and interests. In this meeting students are also linked with their collaborative partner(s) with whom they will engage for the shared task. The task is explained by staff members from both institutions.

  • Stage 1 debrief & Prep for Stage 2

Staff at each institution debrief with their respective group of students and check that they are aware of the structure of the project and the requirements for the next meetings/stages.

  • Stage 2

Allocated pairs/groups meet via Skype to start to discuss the task and to focus on the required work. It is suggested that there may be three meetings of this type but pairs/groups may decide to increase this if necessary. In addition to Skype, the pairs/groups may choose to communicate via email or other electronic platforms.

  • Stage 2 debrief

Staff at the respective institutions meet with participants to check and motivate their progress during Stage 2 and to prepare for Stages 3 and 4.

  • Stage 3

This is a final meeting between pairs/groups of students to finish off the task and to build in any suggestions made from the previous meeting. After this meeting the task is submitted.

  • Final prep for Stage 4

Staff meet with the groups of students at each institution to check their preparations for the final presentations.

  • Stage 4 - Final presentations

Students present either a shared document which represents their achievement of the task or present a series of powerpoint slides. This meeting is attended by all students and both staff members via Skype.

The course will take the form of a series of workshops and paired activities.  Some of these will be physical meetings and others will involve pair or group work via skype or Video Conference.

Learning outcomes

This course will:

  • deepen your understanding and international awareness of an area of study
  • teach you how academic problems or tasks can be approached from different cultural perspectives
  • introduce you to learning and alternative cultural norms or expectations through working with students from another country
  • allow you to use electronic resources to communicate and work collaboratively with students overseas in order to complete a series of tasks and present findings
  • enhance your time management and organisation skills
  • introduce you to the concept of the international classroom and learning environment
  • help you develop presentation, team and group work skills
  • enhance your international verbal and written communication skills

To take part in this course, there is an informal interview process

 

KE134 - KE140 Games and Puzzles: A Mathematical Approach to Strategy and Analysis

Dates:
Times:
Number of hours: 2 hours per session
Employability Points: 5 points per session
Location: Canterbury campus

Word

Games and Puzzles: A Mathematical Approach to Strategy and Analysis

Course outline

"Everyone likes to play games" and the range covers simple games like snakes and ladders to complex games like Chess and Go. The course will look at the history of game-playing and explore the development of strategic concepts incorporating aspects of recreational mathematics. You do not need to be a mathematician to participate in these workshops. You will have the chance to enjoy learning and playing some less-familiar games. Puzzles are effectively one-player games and we will examine a range of challenging examples that require unusual methods to solve them.

KE134 - Games and Puzzles: A Mathematical Approach

A brief history of board games; simple and complex games, variable skill levels and the learning process, the social and psychological dimension.

KE135 - Games and Puzzles: Number Games

The wide range of Japanese number puzzles (i.e. Beyond Sudoku), NIM-type games, puzzles e.g. Kakoru, ABC Logic, Towers, Minesweeper, Hitori etc. as well as Yahtze/Rumikub and Hare and Tortoise

KE136 - Games and Puzzles: Placement and Traversal Games

Noughts and crosses, Connect-4, Nine Men's Morris, Hex, Othello/Reversi, Chinese Chequers, Domineering, Infernal Triangles and Go

KE137 - Games and Puzzles - Games of Sequence

Pentominoes, Knights Tour, the L-Game, Boxes, Sprouts, The Travelling Salesman and Monty Hall

KE138 - Games and Puzzles - Chase and Capture Games

Ludo, Fox and Geese, Draughts and Chess

KE139 - Games and Puzzles - Probability Games

Bridge, Poker, Backgammon, three-player games, the role of computers and A.I.

KE140 - Games and Puzzles - Strategy and Analysis

An opportunity for you to bring along your own favourite games and introduce them to the rest of the group

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • learn the history of game-playing
  • explore the development of strategic concepts incorporating aspects of recreational mathematics

 

KE141 - Castle Life in Kent and Sussex

Course date:
Times:
Number of hours: 6 hours (1 x 6 hour session)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum, (based on 100% attendance).

Greek flag

Castle Life in Kent and Sussex

Course outline

This study day will explore the life of people living in castles in Kent and Sussex in the Middle Ages. It will take an overview of castles as both fortresses and homes of the aristocracy, but focus on as much as possible on all those who lived and worked around them- from cooks to carpenters, hunters to poachers, servants as well as lords and ladies. The specific examples of castles and their estates will be Scotney, Bodiam, Ightham Mote and Knole, and the study day will draw on the latest research and new techniques for investigating past lives and landscapes.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Locate and understand the castles of Kent and Sussex within the wider geographical and cultural framework of those of medieval England and Wales.
  • Understand modern historical and archaeological techniques used to investigate castles.
  • Interpret castles which they visit with deeper understanding.
  • Consider researching castles, great houses, manors and their landscapes with a greater understanding of their nature and the sources used for their interpretation.

KE142 - Introduction to Medieval and Early Tudor Canterbury

Course date:
Times:
Number of hours: 10 hours (5 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 25 points maximum, (based on 100% attendance).

stained-glass-window

Introduction to Medieval and Early Tudor Canterbury

Course outline

Medieval Canterbury is justly famous for having owned a 1215 copy of Magna Carta, for being the site of St Thomas Becket’s internationally important shrine and for inspiring Geoffrey Chaucer’s masterpiece: The Canterbury Tales. As the senior archiepiscopal see in England from the time of St Augustine in c.600, the Church was a major institution in this royal city, and its location between London and the Channel ports and France meant that was visited by merchants, ambassadors and pilgrims, but also soldiers who were engaged in such conflicts as the Hundred Years War and the Wars of the Roses. This meant that Canterbury was a hive of commercial activity but also a melting pot of ideas and people. Concentrating in this short course on the period from the Black Death (c.1350) to the Reformation (c.1550) and using the four themes of Crown, Church, Communities and Culture students will explore wide-ranging aspects of the later Middle Ages through the lens of later medieval and early Tudor Canterbury.

The course will comprise short lectures and seminars where students will explore primary sources, especially a wide range of documentary materials in translation, to analyse how people lived, worked, worshiped, played and died in this period. The teaching will involve individual and group learning activities thereby enhancing students’ analytical skills and their abilities to work as effective team members.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • discuss the role of the Church in medieval Kentish society
  • demonstrate an understanding of the importance of Canterbury, regionally and nationally, during the Middle Ages
  • demonstrate an understanding of the changes and continuities found in late medieval urban society
  • show an appreciation of the interdependency of urban and rural society in medieval east Kent and England more broadly.
  • analyse different types of primary materials from the period, especially textual sources

This course has already started.

KE143 - Advanced Spreadsheets 4: Charts in Microsoft Excel

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1 hour
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

 

Please note: you will require a good working knowledge of Microsoft Excel for this workshop

excel

Advanced Spreadsheets 4 Microsoft Excel

 

Course outline

This is a single practical computing session covering charts in Microsoft Excel, including:

  • How to create different charts
  • How to format and enhance charts
  • How to set up charts for printing

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Create simple charts
  • Explore different chart types
  • Format charts
  • Enhance charts
  • Print charts

You will be provided with a handout.

KE144 - Advanced Word Processing: Mail Merge in Microsoft Word

Date:
Time: 15:00-16:00
Number of hours: 1 hour
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

Word

Advanced Word Processing: Mail Merge in Microsoft Word

Course outline

This is a single practical computing session covering:

  • How to prepare a mail merge document
  • How to edit and organise recipient lists
  • How to use mail merge rules
  • How to complete a mail merge
  • How to mail merge to labels

You will be provided with a workbook should you wish to continue exploring in your own time.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Create and edit a mail merge document
  • Work with various data sources
  • Merge documents
  • Perform merge queries
  • Merge labels

 

KE145 - Introduction to Chinese Taoist Philosophy

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 1x 3 hour session
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersIntroduction to Chinese Taoist Philosophy

Course outline

The development of Taoist philosophy will be traced from its early roots in Chinese Shamanism, through to the modern day, uncovering Taoism’s expression in culture, philosophy, religion, health, martial arts and personal life to reveal contemporary relevance.


Sophisticated Taoist concepts, philosophical and analytical constructs, such as: yin/yang; the five element theory and the Bagua (8 trigrams) will be presented as practical tools for application today.


Classical texts including the Tao Te Jing, I Ching and the Yellow Emperor’s Canon of Internal Medicine will be discussed in order for students to gain appreciation of the depth and breadth of Taoist thought and references giving insight to popular current and personal situations.
In addition to the Philosophy, religious Taoism and the interaction of Taoism with Buddhism and Confucianism will be outlined.

Through lecture, discussion and practice, students will learn and experience everyday applications of Taoist principles, which they could incorporate in their lives, including guided exercises for:

  • Health (standing Zhan Zhuang)
  • Movement (Tai Chi Chuan)
  • Change (meditation)


    To conclude, students’ will have an opportunity to reflect on experiences and seek advice on continued study and including Taoism into their daily lives should they wish to.

Students should wear shoes with flexible soles and comfortable clothes to keep warm while sitting meditating and to allow mobility in light preparatory exercise and for gentle movement.

 

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • understand the roots and development of Taoism from shamanism to the modern day
  • identify fundamental Taoist philosophies and classical sources of Taoist thought
  • learn how Taoism is expressed in culture, health, martial arts, spirituality
  • pragmatically apply Taoist principles in health, movement and meditation

KE146 - Harry Potter and the Literary Phenomenon

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 6 hours (3x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersHarry Potter and the Literary Phenomenon

Course outline

J K Rowling published the first Potter novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, in 1997. The seven-book series about the adventures of the boy wizard has gone on to sell more than 400m copies around the world, and has been the subject of PhDs and academic conferences. This short course begins by looking at the publishing and marketing phenomenon that is ‘Pottermania’ before going on to consider its literary influences from the medieval to the modern, and themes as diverse as food, education, segregation, philosophy, the symbolism of animals and the rise of fascism. The study of the novels will be supported with extracts from the eight films.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Place the phenomenon that is Harry Potter™ in its social, cultural and educational context and understand some of the reasons for its popularity.
  • Perceive the texts in an ideological context and interrogate the circumstances surrounding their production.
  • Interpret the texts in a critical way, illustrating arguments with well-chosen examples.
  • Demonstrate their knowledge through the construction of critical arguments and defend those arguments with confidence.
  • Analyse literary works in detail through the development of close reading skills

KE147 - Understanding Traditional British Woodland Management - Cutting it down, cutting it up: basic timber processing

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1x 3 hour session
Employability Points: 10 points (Based on 100% attendance)

Basic Timber Processing

Course outline

This course will be built around observation and illustrated discussion about the traditional woodland management practices employed in Britain in the past – and how these have impacted the development of woodland habitat to produce the ‘nature’ we now see before us. Identification and discussion will also be made of the different tree species present in mixed deciduous woodlands and the relationship between their growth habit, the timber they produce, and the traditional craft uses to which they have been put – in this case practically demonstrated through the safe use of basic forestry tools to fell and process a tree.  

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students will have an understanding British traditional woodland management practices and their effect on nature

 

You will need to wear old clothes and sturdy footwear.

The craft area in Brotherhood Wood is accessible to anyone who can walk without significant difficulty.

KE148 - U. N. I. (You and I) Protect

Dates and times:

There are 2 different workshop groups available. Please only sign up for one.

The workshops will take place during weeks

Monday
Friday

UNI Protect

U.N.I. (You and I) Protect


Number of hours: 4.5 hours (3x 1.5 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury Campus

Course outline

The ‘U.N.I (You and I) Protect’ movement encourages students to be active bystanders by equipping students with the skills to recognise and safely intervene in an instance of sexual harassment or abuse.


The course will be delivered in three workshops by experienced facilitators and each workshop will last approximately 1.5 hours.
You will be asked to complete an anonymous ‘Social norms’ questionnaire in the first session and will be asked to provide feedback at the end of the course.

There will be no homework but resources and readings are available on the Moodle site if you wish to learn more about the issues raised in the workshop.


Please note that there are important ground rules to consider for this course, specifically around confidentiality and please also be aware that throughout the course the group will be discussing sensitive issues. The sessions are run by experienced Facilitators who can help and support the participants and the Wellbeing Team are also available for support, if needed.

 

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    • Understand what a ‘bystander’ is, form ideas about the types of situations which might call for a bystander intervention and become confident and motivated active bystanders.
    • Develop familiarity with intervention strategies and be safe and comfortable practising intervention behaviours
    • Understand that individuals can often be mistaken about others’ beliefs and values
    • Understand why sexual violence and domestic violence is a problem in society and in student populations
    • Recognise the links between sexist attitudes, discriminatory practices and gender based violence; and,
    • Understand more detail about rape and sexual assault including rape ‘myths’, male rape and sexual assault, law definitions and issues around consent

       

KE151 - European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL)

Dates:
Time:

Number of hours: 10 hours (10 x 1 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 50 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury Campus

ECDL Logo

European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL)

Course outline

The ability to use a computer effectively is an essential life skill. Computer skills enable people of all ages to understand and use technology to improve their personal and professional lives. Certified computer skills can help the holder’s professional life by making them more attractive to employers, while increasing their ability to communicate and access information and services in their personal life.

This course offers computing sessions with trainers available to support online learning and guidance to complete the full ECDL Extra qualification. Depending on initial IT skill level there may be 1-4 hrs per module online learning required outside of the sessions.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate to employers their IT knowledge by gaining an internationally recognised IT qualification covering Word processing, Spreadsheets, Presentations and Improving Productivity
  •  

KE153 - A Short Introduction to the Welsh Language

Course dates:
Times:
Number of hours: 6 hours (3 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Welsh flag

A Short Introduction to the Welsh Language

Course outline

This course will introduce students to the Welsh language, covering basic conversational phrases and how Welsh fits in the context of other Celtic languages. Each class will be split between a lecture and conversation practice.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Understand the development of the modern Welsh language from its Proto-Celtic origins;
  • Speak basic phrases in Welsh, including greetings, weather, and ordering from a café, with correct pronunciation and intonation;
  • Be able to distinguish Welsh from other Celtic languages when written, and heard.

KE154 - Environmental Management and Auditing

Dates:
Time:

Number of hours: 8 hours (4 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 40 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury Campus

Forest

Environmental Management and Auditing

Course outline

Session 1: Environmental Management Systems (EMS) part 1:

  • Types of EMS
  • Drivers for Environmental Management
  • Setting up and running an EMS

Session 2: Environmental Management Systems (EMS) part 2:

  • Setting up and running an EMS
  • Behaviour Change programmes
  • The ‘Plan, Do, Check, Act’ approach

Session 3: Environmental Management Systems (EMS) part 3:

  • What is auditing?
  • Auditor skills
  • Audit techniques
  • Guided audit

Session 4: Auditing (practical)

  • Conducting 1 or 2 basic environmental audits of University buildings
  • Understanding audit results
  • Making recommendations

Sessions 1 and 2 will be classroom based and will consist of presentations and small-group exercises.
Sessions 3 and 4 will be part classroom based and will also involve students conducting prearranged environmental audits of University buildings.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Understand the drivers for Environmental Management in organisations
  • Develop a knowledge of Environmental Management Systems and how organisations use them to manage their impacts
  • Understand the potential benefits and challenges of an environmental behaviour change programme and develop the skills necessary to influence positive environmental behaviour in the workplace
  • Learn basic environmental auditing skills
  • Conduct several environmental audits of University buildings

KE155 - An Introduction to Sustainability

Dates:
Time:

Number of hours: 8 hours (4 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury Campus

Earth from space. Image Credit: NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring

An Introduction to Sustainability

Course outline

Week One – What is Sustainability? (2hrs interactive lecture with exercises and group activities)

  • Definitions of sustainability
  • Sustainability explained with natural science
  • What sustainability challenges are we facing globally?
  • Trends for energy use, population growth, lifestyle, food production and need.
  • An introduction to the Millennium Development Goals and Sustainable Development Goals
  • Using a PESTLE analysis to understand a sustainability issue: Food

Week Two – Environmental, Economic and Social Sustainability (Part One) (2hrs interactive lecture with exercises and group activities)

  • Environmental: An introduction to the Climate Change Challenge
  • Environmental: Ecosystem Services and biodiversity decline
  • Economic: Are economic growth and sustainability incompatible?
  • Economic: Who pays for socials and environmental damage?

Week Three – Environmental, Economic and Social Sustainability (Part Two) (2hrs
interactive lecture with exercises and group activities)

  • Social: Human Needs
  • Social: The importance of toilets!
  • Social: Inequality around the world
  • Understanding systems and the connectivity of the problem
  • Case studies from around the world

Week Four – Innovating for a sustainable future (2hrs interactive lecture with exercises and group activities)

  • Doing more with less
  • Sustainability: A catalyst for innovation
  • Examples from Architecture, Zero Waste Design, City Planning…
  • Collaborations across curricula and sectors
  • Behaviour change interventions
  • What are we doing here at Kent?
  • What can you do?

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Give a concise definition of sustainability
  • Have an understanding of the key environmental, social and economic challenges facing the world
  • Describe systems thinking
  • Give examples of innovations/solutions to global challenges
  • Talk about what is currently being done at Kent around sustainability and what they can do as individuals

KE156 - Discover Dutch

Course dates:
Times:
Number of hours: 10 hours (5 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 25 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

windmills-and-canal

Discover Dutch

Course outline

Discover Dutch is a course for beginners who would like to know more about the Dutch language and the culture in Dutch-speaking countries and regions, especially The Netherlands and Flanders (in Belgium). No previous experience with Dutch is required. Through an introduction of the habits and culture of the Dutch and the Flemish, students will learn to introduce themselves and their family, order food and drinks, and talk about their job and hobbies. Finally, students will also learn to make some travel arrangements, so they can go out and practice speaking Dutch in Amsterdam, Bruges or even Aruba.  

Session 1: Introducing Dutch Around the World

  • Students will be introduced to Dutch speakers around the world (and the different varieties of Dutch)
  • Students will learn how to introduce themselves in Dutch
  • Students will learn to pronounce common Dutch sounds

Session 2: Ordering Food and Drink

  • Students will learn about the variety of food and drink in Dutch-speaking countries and regions
  • Students will learn to order some food and drink at a restaurant
  • Students will learn some basic Dutch verbs in the present tense and learn to count in Dutch

Session 3: Family and Friends

  • Students will learn about habits of families and friends in Dutch-speaking countries and regions
  • Students will learn to introduce their family members and describe their friends
  • Students will learn some common Dutch pronouns, nouns and adjectives

Session 4: Work and Leisure

  • Students will learn about common professions and popular hobbies in Dutch-speaking countries and regions
  • Students will learn to talk about their own jobs and hobbies
  • Students will learn about the past tense of some basic Dutch verbs

Session 5: Travelling, Sightseeing and Culture

  • Students will learn about popular destinations in Dutch-speaking countries and regions.
  • Students will learn to ask for direction and make some travel arrangements
  • Students will learn about the future tense of some basic Dutch verbs

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Introduce themselves and their family
  • Order food and drinks
  • Talk about their job and hobbies
  • Make some travel arrangements

 

KE157 - My Courtroom: Introduction to Care Proceedings via Simulation Learning

Date:
Time:

Number of hours: 3 hours (1 x 3 hour session)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury Campus

Rosie's family go to court

Introduction to care proceedings via simulation learning

Course outline

Learning and Teaching Methods:

  • Lecture, simulation, report reading and group discussions are the methods of teaching that will be employed to meet the learning outcomes.
  • A lecture will introduce learning outcomes, key concerns raised by child protection practitioners around court work skills and cover a basic foundation of court knowledge which is necessary to proceed.
  • Participants will be asked to read a short ‘safeguarding letter’ to introduce the background of the family. We will discuss the contents of this letter as a group.
  • myCourtroom: Rosie’s family go to court is a simulation designed to support the acquisition of court room skills and knowledge and this will be introduced. The First Directions Hearing (Private law) scene will be played in full. Group discussion will be held looking at potential difficulties and expectations at key points in this scene.
  • Building on the previous activity, progression to the next scene in myCourtroom will include a direct work session with Rosie whereby she discloses concerns. Group discussions will be held looking at how this material should be handled and how they feel about it. Ultimately, this will lead to the initiation of public law proceedings.
  • The Final Hearing scene from myCourtroom will be played in part and participants will be asked to consider the roles of different professionals in this arena, the process of cross examination and giving evidence.
  • If time allows, a lecture on key cross examination and preparation techniques can be provided; however, this is unlikely.
  • This will all be undertaken in 3 hours.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:

  • Appreciate key concerns raised by child protection practitioners around court work skills
  • Understand the difference between private and public law settings
  • Consider the different roles and expertise in courts
  • Reflect on direct work with children whose families are involved in proceedings
  • Start contemplating skills to provide evidence or be cross examined in public law proceedings

It would be useful to view Rosie1 simulation which will give you an introduction to Rosie and her family. Rosie is 4 years old within Rosie1 and in myCourtroom: Rosie’s family go to court she is 12; however, having this historical background can be helpful. Rosie1 can be downloaded for free from: https://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/game/rosie1index.html

KE158 - Acting for Beginners

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 9 hours (6 x 1.5 hours)
Employability Points: 25 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersActing for Beginners

Course outline

Acting for Beginners is suitable for anyone interested in acting who has no background in drama or acting training.

This course will look at the tools actors use to create character and story. Students will work together on different scenes and improvised scenarios exploring these techniques, ultimately using them in the work on a scene from a play which will be directed in the final session. In addition to this students will receive personal attention and feedback as much as possible throughout the course.

  • The lessons will all be practical workshops.
  • Students will be taught in a group/workshop environment of no more than 18 people. Every student will be fully engaged and given attention at suitable moments throughout the class and time will be allocated for tutor demonstration and explanations.
  • There is little independent study required, maximum time will likely be a few hours across the full course. This will largely be required for learning lines, but also for repeating any vocal or physical exercises that the student finds helpful.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Create character
  • Make clear offers in improvised and scripted scenarios
  • Understand better how to approach text
  • Increased confidence
  • Better understanding of vocal and physical communication

KE159 - Acting for Improvers

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 9 hours (6 x 1.5 hours)
Employability Points: 25 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersActing for Improvers

Course outline

Acting for Improvers is suitable for anyone with some experience of acting who is looking to continue experimenting with different approaches.

This course will look at the tools actors use to create character and story. Students will work together on different scenes and improvised scenarios exploring these techniques, ultimately using them in the work on a scene from a play which will be directed in the final session. In addition to this students will receive personal attention and feedback as much as possible throughout the course.

  • The lessons will all be practical workshops.
  • Students will be taught in a group/workshop environment of no more than 18 people. Every student will be fully engaged and given attention at suitable moments throughout the class and time will be allocated for tutor demonstration and explanations.
  • There is little independent study required, maximum time will likely be a few hours across the full course. This will largely be required for learning lines, but also for repeating any vocal or physical exercises that the student finds helpful.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Create believable characters drawn from life
  • Use rehearsal tools to improve performance
  • Better understand how to use your voice effectively
  • Stronger understanding of body language, and its use in performance
  • Perform a script with well-developed characters

KE160 - Woodland Crafts: Hazel Hurdles (Fence Sections)

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 4 hours
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersHazel Hurdles (Fence Sections)

Course outline

One of the principle traditional uses of hazel coppice was in the production of hazel hurdle (woven fence panels). This workshop will instruct participants in the process of producing traditional hazel hurdles – from the cutting and processing of the split hazel, though to the finished article. Participants will also come to understand the historical and ecological importance of the practice.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Understand the tradition, historical and ecological significance, and the process of making hurdles (fence panels) from coppiced hazel - and have the experience of collectively making a hazel hurdle.

**Students will need to be properly prepared by wearing old clothes and sturdy footwear. Feel free to also bring a tea mug and your favourite tea bags if PG Tips won’t do.**

 

The craft area in Brotherhood Wood is accessible to anyone who can walk without significant difficulty.

 

 

KE192 - #DigitalReboot Business Start-Up Workshops

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 10 hours (5x 2 hr sessions)
Employability Points: 50 points maximum (based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

busines-start-up

#DigitalReboot Business Start-Up Workshops

Course outline

Delivered in group sessions with like-minded students, attendees will benefit from a series of workshops that will cover the following topics:

  • Generating an app idea,
  • Capturing your idea
  • App UX and design
  • Building your app
  • Funding your app & Launching plans
  • Dragons Den – final presentation of ideas and peer feedback,

 
Workshop 1 – 'The Beginning - Capturing your idea'

  • Introductions
  • Ideas Generations
  • Workshopping the ideas
  • Model the business behind the app
  • Desk research
  • Protecting your idea (NDAs / IP / Patents)

Workshop 2 – App UX and design

  • Developing personas,
  • UX vs Design,
  • Wireframing / Paper prototyping
  • Tools to design / wireframe
  • Building an interactive prototype

Workshop 3 – Building your app

  • Approach options
  • Working with a CTO / internal team vs hiring externally
  • App security
  • GDPR
  • Project management
  • QA and testing
  • Continue app design work and idea development

Workshop 4 – 'Finance and Funding'

  • How to raise money
  • Sell your idea to others – the pitch!
  • How to market your app
  • Continue app design work and idea development

Workshop 5 – Dragons Den

  • Final presentation of ideas and peer feedback
  • Finalising app design work and idea development

Learning outcomes

The workshops have been structured so that all students who are interested in developing an app, either as the core of a business idea or as an ancillary part of a wider business can feel confident that they know the challenges and approaches to take to deliver an app or other mobile solution.
By the end of this course, students should be able to;

  • Understand the various processes for designing and building an app or mobile solution
  • Pitch their app concept

KE161 - Woodland Crafts: Making a Brash Fence

Dates: Wednesday week 20 (6 March)
Time: 12:00-16:00
Number of hours: 4 hours (1 x 4 hours)
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersMaking a Brash Fence

Course outline

This workshop will instruct participants in the process of producing a traditional brash fence – from the cutting and processing of the wood and post making, though to the construction of a brash fence. Participants will also come to understand the historical and ecological importance of this practice.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Understand the tradition and the process of making a brash fence in the context of the traditional woodland management practice of coppicing. Students will be able to make fence posts, construct  a frame and install the brash.

**Students will need to be properly prepared by wearing old clothes and sturdy footwear. Feel free to also bring a tea mug and your favourite tea bags if PG Tips won’t do.**

 

The craft area in Brotherhood Wood is accessible to anyone who can walk without significant difficulty.

 

KE162 - Tree Identification: Bark and Buds

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 4 hours (1 x 4 hours)
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersTree Identification: Barks and Buds

Course outline

This workshop will instruct participants in the identification of native tree species by examining a combination of their bark and buds. It will also provide an understanding of the ecology and anthropological significance of these species.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Identify most of the native tree species present on the Canterbury campus by examining a combination of their bark and buds

**Students will need to be properly prepared by wearing old clothes and sturdy footwear. Feel free to also bring a tea mug and your favourite tea bags if PG Tips won’t do.**

 

The craft area in Brotherhood Wood is accessible to anyone who can walk without significant difficulty.

 

KE164 - Formatting Essays in Microsoft Word

Dates:
Times:
Number of hours: 1
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

Word

Formatting Essays in Microsoft Word

 

Course outline

The course will comprise a small workshop of a 1 hr practical computing session covering:

  • How to format text and paragraphs consistently in Word using word-processing features
  • How to use automatic formatting features to save time
  • How to add page numbers and headers to your essay
  • How to review and prepare your essay for printing

No independent learning hours are needed. Students will be provided with a workbook should they
wish to continue exploring in their own time.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Use word processing fundamentals
  • Edit text and arrange text easily
  • Apply formatting to text and paragraphs
  • Use editing tools to find and replace text
  • Use the spell checker
  • Understand headers and footers
  • Change page layout options

 

KE165 - Beginners' Microsoft Excel

Dates:
Times:
Number of hours: 1.5
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

word

Beginners' Spreadsheets with Microsoft Excel

 

Course outline

The course will comprise a small workshop of a 1.5 hr practical computing session covering:

  • How to prepare a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel
  • How to create simple formulae and use basic built-in functions
  • How to apply a variety of formatting features to cells and worksheets
  • How to prepare a worksheet for printing

No independent learning hours are needed. Students will be provided with a workbook should they
wish to continue exploring in their own time.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:

  • Use spreadsheet fundamentals
  • Create new and work with existing spreadsheets
  • Create simple formulae
  • Format the display of cells
  • Edit, copy and move cells
  • Use basic functions
  • Set printing options and preview

KE166 - Advanced Spreadsheets 4: Charts in Microsoft Excel

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1 hour
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

 

Please note: you will require a good working knowledge of Microsoft Excel for this workshop

excel

Advanced Spreadsheets 4 Microsoft Excel

 

Course outline

The course will comprise a small workshop of a 1 hr practical computing session covering:

  • How to create different charts
  • How to format and enhance charts
  • How to set up charts for printing

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Create simple charts
  • Explore different chart types
  • Format charts
  • Enhance charts
  • Print charts

You will be provided with a handout.

 

KE167 - Beginners' Microsoft PowerPoint

Dates and times:
Number of hours: 1.5 hours
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

MS-PowerPoint

Beginners' Presentations with Microsoft PowerPoint

Course outline

The course will comprise a small workshop of 1.5 hrs practical computing session covering:

  • How to prepare a Presentation from scratch in MS PowerPoint
  • How to use themes, slide layouts and tools to create a consistent presentation
  • How to apply a variety of formatting features
  • How to run a slide show and apply slide transitions

No independent learning hours are needed. Students will be provided with a workbook should they wish to continue exploring in their own time.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:

  • Use presentation fundamentals
  • Create new and work with existing presentations
  • Use themes and pre-defined presentations
  • Insert and work with different slide layouts
  • Use a variety of formatting tools
  • Apply animations to slide objects
  • Apply slide transitions
  • Run a slide show

 

KE168 - Formatting Dissertations in Microsoft Word

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

Word

Formatting Essays in Microsoft Word

 

Course outline

The course will comprise a small workshop of a 1.5 hr practical computing session covering:

  • How to format a dissertation in Word using some advanced features
  • How to apply and modify styles to create consistent looking documents and how this enables creation of a table of contents
  • How to use referencing tools including footnotes, endnotes and captions
  • How to create tables of figures
  • How to divide your documents into sections and control page numbering
  • How to use different headers and footers across document sections

No independent learning hours are needed. Students will be provided with a workbook should they
wish to continue exploring in their own time.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Produce professional looking documents
  • Apply and modify styles
  • Create tables of contents
  • Use referencing tools including footnotes, endnotes and captions
  • Create tables of figures
  • Work with sections

 

KE169 - Get Ready for Work: Sharpen Your Writing Skills and Build a Powerful CV

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 6 hours (2x 3 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

writing skills

Sharpen your writing skills and build a powerful CV

Course outline

At the university’s career fair, graduate recruiters put communication skills top of the list. Sadly for them, about 20 per cent of graduates’ English skills are not up to scratch for the workplace. Many student CVs cause employers to weep.
Employers look for confident, professional communicators. They want people who write clearly, concisely and effectively. Whether you’re emailing a colleague or writing a punchy executive summary, your writing has to be accurate, and make things happen.
This practical workshop course will help you make your words count. We’ll pin down the function of different kinds of writing. We’ll identify who we’re writing for. We’ll learn about tone, content and structure. We’ll include a scattering of grammar and punctuation so you’ll avoid the worst pitfalls. We’ll examine exactly what will make an employer love your CV.
Above all, we’ll write. Bring a pen and paper or a laptop and be ready to try out all kinds of writing.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Understand what writing skills employers look for
  • Be ready to write clearly, accurately and effectively in a professional context
  • Have a toolkit for approaching any piece of writing, from emailing the CEO to writing a press release
  • Be ready to write a persuasive and effective CV.

     

KE170 - The Ever-Changing Face of Sherlock Holmes

Dates: Time:
Number of hours: 6 hours (3 x 2 hours)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersThe Ever-Changing Face of Sherlock Holmes

Course outline

Sherlock Holmes is probably the most famous sleuth ever created. The first detective to be transferred to film, he has been re-created countless times over the years by over 80 actors. As a result, our notion of him is based as much on these re-creations as on the stories themselves. This course examines, through analysis of a selection of texts and film extracts, the ways in which this iconic character, has been re-invigorated for each new audience, and how the stories, originally cutting-edge and contemporary, have managed to retain their relevance up to the present day.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Analyse a selection of key works by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in their historical context and interrogate the circumstances surrounding their production.
  • Critique a selection of cinematic revisions of the texts and understand how they are made relevant to contemporary audiences.
  • Interpret the texts in a critical way, illustrating arguments with well-chosen examples.
  • Demonstrate their knowledge through the construction of critical arguments and defend those arguments with confidence.
  • Analyse literary works in detail through the development of close reading skills

KE171 - Introduction to Chinese Medicine

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 3 hours (1x 3 hour session)
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersIntroduction to Chinese Medicine

Course outline

An accessible introduction to the philosophical paradigm that underlies Chinese medicine and how this is reflected in corresponding views of physiology, illness and treatment. Initially, to appreciate the medical perspective underpinning practices such as acupuncture, students will first explore the concepts of Qi, Yin and Yang and the five elements through discussion and use of classical models. Building upon these philosophical bases the broad historical influences contributing to the development of Chinese medicine will be briefly traced to the modern day. Culminating ideas of human physiology in the current day will then be compared and distinguished to a comparative Western model to apply and enhance understanding. With the philosophical and conceptual models as a basis pathology and treatment from a Chinese perspective will then be considered.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • appreciate the philosophical perspectives underpinning traditional Chinese medicine
  • outline the historical development of traditional Chinese medicine and contributions to views of health
  • recognise major differences between Western and traditional Chinese views of human physiology
  • grasp the broad principles of treatment applied in traditional Chinese medicine

KE172 - A Journey through 100 Years of Art and History (1860s-1970s)

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 6 hours (3 x 2 hours)
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersA Journey through 100 Years of Art and History (1860s-1970s)

Course outline

Travel through more than 100 years of art and art history. Discover art historical developments and changes from the 1860s – 1970s. We will examine the conditions in which art was created, exhibited, discussed and collected in conjunction with social, cultural political and technological developments.

Our journey will lead us through one of the most exciting time periods in art history: what is called “Modern Art” lasted for an entire century and involved numerous different art movements, including almost everything from representational Realism by Courbet to abstract Cubism by Picasso, from impressionistic paintings by Manet to dadaistic installations by Schwitters as well as Warhol’s screen printing process used for his Pop Art.

We will examine the conditions in which art was created, exhibited, discussed and collected in conjunction with social, cultural political and technological developments. Students will also explore some of the principal art historical approaches and methods in order to describe, analyse and evaluate art works. We will investigate the various relevant contexts in which an art work needs to be seen; for example the historical context as well as the political circumstances in which the art work was produced, biographical details about the artist, technical information about the material that was used and the production process. Students will learn how to “formally” assess an art work by investigating composition techniques, looking closely at lines, shapes, colours and tones.

This course aims to access modern art in conjunction with fundamental art historical methods, approaches and theories as well as historical developments and stylistic contexts. Students will learn to judge an art work by appearance, how to access its meaning and art historical context.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Be familiar with with basic art history and theories.
  • Be acquainted with major artists as well as styles.
  • Have a sound art historical overview of artistic developments

KE173 - Pilgrims, Peasants and Paths in the Middle Ages

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 6 hours
Employability Points: 15 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersPilgrims, Peasants and Paths in the Middle Ages

Course outline

The historic settlements- farmsteads, hamlets and villages and towns- which are spread across the varying landscapes of the southern England are linked by a network of ancient paths and roads.
From new research the study day will explore how to understand the development of these routes and these settlements, and the lives of those who dwelt there- their homes, churches and parish chapels.
On special occasions, not only peasants but also the rich and townsfolk made pilgrimages to major cities and cathedrals. Drawing on old maps, place-names, charters and landscape evidence, the study day will review a variety of pilgrim routes, and also recreate the experience of medieval pilgrim journeys across southern England and beyond.
Bibliographies of possible further reading with particular focus on the new research will be supplied together with copies of reconstruction maps

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • identify various kinds of evidence for historic landscapes 
  • understand how these kinds of evidence are used
  • be equipped to explore further the ecclesiastical buildings which formed part of the experience of pilgrimage and which survive today at Canterbury and beyond

KE174, KE175, KE176 & KE177- Big Ideas: An Introduction to Philosophy

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 12 hours (4x 3 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 20 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

Acting for BeginnersBig Ideas: An Introduction to Philosophy

Course outline

The course consists of four three hour sessions. These sessions will include a range of teaching and learning methods including short lectures, class discussion, pair and group work and short group/or individual presentations.

Students will be given suggested readings to complete in preparation for the classes of about an hour per week, so a total of 4 hours altogether.

Session 1: Idealism (KE174). Idealism is the counter-intuitive claim that the material world doesn’t exist. All that exists are minds and what minds are conscious of. We will examine different versions of this view from the history of philosophy including those of Leibniz and Berkeley and the arguments offered in favour of it.

Session 2: Other minds (KE175). It seems that I can only directly be aware of the contents of my own mind, and only indirectly of the contents of other people’s minds. So philosophical sceptics have raised the possibility that mine is the only mind in existence. Is this a genuine possibility or is there some confusion that makes it seem so? If we need to prove the existence of other minds, what arguments might do the job? We will begin looking at the philosophy of Descartes and move on to examine 20th century attempts to solve the problem in the work of Ryle and Wittgenstein.

Session 3: Evil (KE176). What is evil? Does the existence of evil show that there can be no God? We will look at different philosophical attempts to explain why the human condition involves suffering from St. Augustine through to contemporary philosophers of religion and existentialist thinkers.

Session 4: Good (KE177). What does it mean to call some action or some person morally good? Are moral judgements ultimately grounded in reality? Are they merely expressions of human preferences? These are questions in ‘meta-ethics’ and in this session we will explore arguments offered to answer these questions in the 20th century and also explore the implications these answers may have for our moral practice.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Analyse and explain certain key ideas within the western philosophical tradition.
  • Trace the development and influence of these ideas from their origins in Ancient Greece and up to the present day.
  • Evaluate the philosophical arguments relating to these ideas.

KE178 - IELTS Exam Preparation Taster

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 4 hours (4x 1 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

communicate

IELTS Exam Preparation Taster

Course outline

This course is designed to give you an overview of the skills you need to prepare for the IELTS exam. You will get teacher feedback, the chance to practice skills that are essential to do well in the exam, and familiarisation with the exam task formats. The course is taught by an experienced IELTS teacher.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Be familiar with the format of the IELTS test format
  • Recognize the types of questions asked in Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking tests
  • Complete test tasks within time limits
  • Use a variety of techniques to respond appropriately to IELTS test questions
  • Analyse IELTS Writing Task 1 and 2 questions and respond accordingly

KE179 - Cambridge Exam Preparation Taster

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 4 hours (4x 1 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

communicate

Cambridge Exam Preparation Taster

Course outline

CAE and CPE are part of the world-renowned Cambridge main suite. The course is taught by a tutor experienced in training for Cambridge English exams. A carefully designed study programme will give you an overview of the language and examination skills required and familiarisation with the test formats.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Be familiar with the Cambridge Advanced English (CAE) and Cambridge Proficiency (CPE) test formats
  • Recognize the type of questions asked in the different parts of the tests.
  • Complete test tasks within time limits.
  • Use a variety of techniques to respond appropriately to CAE and CPE test questions
  • Analyse CAE and CPE writing task questions and respond accordingly

KE180 - Film and Media Analysis

Course dates:
Times: 13:00-15:00
Number of hours: 10 hours (5 x 2 hour sessions)
Employability Points: 25 (Based on 100% attendance)

cinema

Film and Media Analysis

Course outline

 

Session 1: Audio-visual basics

We will cover the basics of film and audio-visual analysis: Mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing and sound. You will develop a basic vocabulary which will help you to verbalise what a film is doing and if it is doing it well

Session 2: Visual stories

How do stories work and why are we so preoccupied with them? We will cover some basic narrative theory and philosophy, and learn to analyse the inner mechanics of stories. We will also consider techniques which are special to visual storytelling and deal with issues concerning truth and objectivity.

Session 3: Metaphors are everywhere

You might not have thought about metaphors a lot, but you do often think in metaphors: they pop up everywhere. We will introduce cognitive theories that help us to understand the importance of metaphors and consider how visual media, from marketing to propaganda, have tried to cash in on the persuasive force of metaphors. 

Session 4: Rhetoric and emotions

We continue with issues of persuasion and rhetoric focusing on how visual media can get our emotions going. Ever wondered which emotional buttons Disney films push (and how), or why disgust is an ally of anti-smoking campaigns? You’ll find out as we deal with some psychology and philosophy of emotion.

Session 5: Satire, parody and other complex media

We finish with some more complex media. What is satire and why is it actually not what The Onion does? What is parody and how does it differ from pastiche? Why is irony not simply saying the opposite of what you really mean? Mastering these complex concepts, you will have moved beyond the basic concepts to analyse film and audio-visual media. 

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • use sophisticated vocabulary to analyse film and other visual media
  • apply specialised concepts including irony, parody, satire, metaphor, emotional effect and narrative
  • understand what visual media do and how they are trying to influence audience

 

KE181 - Arabic Taster Session

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1 hour sessions
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

MandarinArabic Taster Session

 

Course outline

Discover World Languages-Taster Sessions are for beginners who would like to have a taster session of one (or all) of the following languages: Arabic and its regions, Japanese, Mandarin and/or Russian. No previous experience with any of the above languages is required. Through an introduction of the habits and culture, students will gain some understanding of key traditions, learn and pronounce a range of simple key words, engage in basic everyday communication, introduce themselves in the target language, learn simple greetings and farewell phrases

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Gain some understanding of key traditions of relevant country
  • Read and pronounce a range of simple key words in relevant target language
  • Engage in basic everyday communication in relevant target language
  • Introduce themselves in target language
  • Greetings and goodbyes

KE182 - Japanese Taster Session

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1 hour sessions
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

MandarinJapanese Taster Session

 

Course outline

Discover World Languages-Taster Sessions are for beginners who would like to have a taster session of one (or all) of the following languages: Arabic and its regions, Japanese, Mandarin and/or Russian. No previous experience with any of the above languages is required. Through an introduction of the habits and culture, students will gain some understanding of key traditions, learn and pronounce a range of simple key words, engage in basic everyday communication, introduce themselves in the target language, learn simple greetings and farewell phrases

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Gain some understanding of key traditions of relevant country
  • Read and pronounce a range of simple key words in relevant target language
  • Engage in basic everyday communication in relevant target language
  • Introduce themselves in target language
  • Greetings and goodbyes

KE183 - Mandarin Chinese Taster Session

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1 hour sessions
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

MandarinMandarin Taster Session

 

Course outline

Discover World Languages-Taster Sessions are for beginners who would like to have a taster session of one (or all) of the following languages: Arabic and its regions, Japanese, Mandarin and/or Russian. No previous experience with any of the above languages is required. Through an introduction of the habits and culture, students will gain some understanding of key traditions, learn and pronounce a range of simple key words, engage in basic everyday communication, introduce themselves in the target language, learn simple greetings and farewell phrases

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Gain some understanding of key traditions of relevant country
  • Read and pronounce a range of simple key words in relevant target language
  • Engage in basic everyday communication in relevant target language
  • Introduce themselves in target language
  • Greetings and goodbyes

KE184 - Russian Taster Session

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 1 hour sessions
Employability Points: 5 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

MandarinRussian Taster Session

 

Course outline

Discover World Languages-Taster Sessions are for beginners who would like to have a taster session of one (or all) of the following languages: Arabic and its regions, Japanese, Mandarin and/or Russian. No previous experience with any of the above languages is required. Through an introduction of the habits and culture, students will gain some understanding of key traditions, learn and pronounce a range of simple key words, engage in basic everyday communication, introduce themselves in the target language, learn simple greetings and farewell phrases

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Gain some understanding of key traditions of relevant country
  • Read and pronounce a range of simple key words in relevant target language
  • Engage in basic everyday communication in relevant target language
  • Introduce themselves in target language
  • Greetings and goodbyes

KE192 - #DigitalReboot Business Start-Up Workshops

Date:
Time:
Number of hours: 10 hours (5x 2 hr sessions)
Employability Points: 50 points maximum (based on 100% attendance)
Location: Canterbury campus

busines-start-up

#DigitalReboot Business Start-Up Workshops

Course outline

Delivered in group sessions with like-minded students, attendees will benefit from a series of workshops that will cover the following topics:

  • Generating an app idea,
  • Capturing your idea
  • App UX and design
  • Building your app
  • Funding your app & Launching plans
  • Dragons Den – final presentation of ideas and peer feedback,

 
Workshop 1 – 'The Beginning - Capturing your idea'

  • Introductions
  • Ideas Generations
  • Workshopping the ideas
  • Model the business behind the app
  • Desk research
  • Protecting your idea (NDAs / IP / Patents)

Workshop 2 – App UX and design

  • Developing personas,
  • UX vs Design,
  • Wireframing / Paper prototyping
  • Tools to design / wireframe
  • Building an interactive prototype

Workshop 3 – Building your app

  • Approach options
  • Working with a CTO / internal team vs hiring externally
  • App security
  • GDPR
  • Project management
  • QA and testing
  • Continue app design work and idea development

Workshop 4 – 'Finance and Funding'

  • How to raise money
  • Sell your idea to others – the pitch!
  • How to market your app
  • Continue app design work and idea development

Workshop 5 – Dragons Den

  • Final presentation of ideas and peer feedback
  • Finalising app design work and idea development

Learning outcomes

The workshops have been structured so that all students who are interested in developing an app, either as the core of a business idea or as an ancillary part of a wider business can feel confident that they know the challenges and approaches to take to deliver an app or other mobile solution.
By the end of this course, students should be able to;

  • Understand the various processes for designing and building an app or mobile solution
  • Pitch their app concept

KE193 - Woodland Crafts: Safely Felling Small Trees

Dates:
Time:
Number of hours: 4 hours (1 x 4 hours)
Employability Points: 10 points maximum (Based on 100% attendance)

tree fellingSafely felling small trees

Course outline

You will learn about the process of safely felling small trees (up to 150mm diameter) in a controlled manner using hand tools.You will also come to understand the historical and ecological importance of this practice in the context of sustainable woodland management practice.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course you will understand the process of safely felling a small tree using hand tools – including dealing effectively with the possible problems encountered.

**Students will need to be properly prepared by wearing old clothes and sturdy footwear. Feel free to also bring a tea mug and your favourite tea bags if PG Tips won’t do.**

 

The craft area in Brotherhood Wood is accessible to anyone who can walk without significant difficulty.

 

 

 

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Last Updated: 08/04/2019