Biomedical Science

Biomedical Science - BSc (Hons)

with a Sandwich Year

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Are you interested in a career in the health services, in a pharmaceutical company or in medical research? Would you like to explore diseases like cancer or the response to infection? Are you intrigued to learn how medicines are discovered and how they work?

Overview

In the School of Biosciences, we have a community spirit and students learn with and from each other. We are also renowned for our innovative teaching methods.

  • New ways of using IT in lectures allow you to revisit the teaching at a later date.
  • Our academics have developed animations to help explain tricky concepts.
  • Special communication projects teach you how to share scientific knowledge with the public.

Our degree is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) and the Royal Society of Biology (RSB).

Our degree programme

During your studies you explore the biochemical processes that occur in the human body, learn how they respond to diseases and how this knowledge can be used to identify and treat diseases. In your future career, this scientific knowledge could be put to practical use within medical healthcare.

In your first and second years, you develop your skills as a bioscientist, covering areas including biological chemistry, genetics, molecular and cellular biology, human physiology and disease, and metabolism.

In your final year, your modules cover areas such as immunology, haematology and blood transfusion, and pathogens. Optional modules cover areas including the biology of ageing, neuroscience and cancer biology.

You also complete your own research project. Our research funding of around £4.5 million a year means that you are taught the most up-to-date science and this allows us to offer some exciting and relevant final-year projects.

We also offer between 20 and 30 paid Summer Studentships each year. You can apply to work in our research labs during the summer holiday and gain hands-on research experience before your final year of study.

Sandwich year

Biomedical Science offers the possibility of doing a one-year placement away from the University between Stages 2 and 3. Sandwich placements provide an excellent opportunity to gain relevant work experience, usually in the pharmaceutical industry or a research institute. These placements can be in the UK or abroad. You are paid by your employer and produce an independent research project.

You can also study or work abroad as part of your degree with our Biomedical Science with a Year Abroad programme or you have the option to take this programme as a three-year degree, without the year in industry. For details, see Biomedical Science.

Study resources

We recently spent £2 million on our laboratories to ensure that you develop your practical skills in a world-class environment. We give you extensive practical training and you spend up to two days a week in the laboratory.

Extra activities

You can join BioSoc, a student-run society. Previous activities have included research talks and social events.

We also encourage our students to attend outside conferences and events. In 2015, Kent students competed with 280 teams and won the gold medal at the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Giant Jamboree in the USA.

Professional network

Our school collaborates with research groups in industry and academia throughout the UK and Europe. It also has excellent links with local employers, such as:

  • NHS
  • GSK
  • MedImmune
  • Eli Lilly
  • Lonza
  • Aesica Pharmaceuticals
  • Sekisui Diagnostics
  • Cairn Research
  • Public Health England.

Entry requirements

You are more than your grades

At Kent we look at your circumstances as a whole before deciding whether to make you an offer to study here. Find out more about how we offer flexibility and support before and during your degree.

Entry requirements

Please contact the School for more information at study-bio@kent.ac.uk

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below. Students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

If you are an international student, visit our International Student website for further information about entry requirements for your country, including details of the International Foundation Programmes. Please note that international fee-paying students who require a Student visa cannot undertake a part-time programme due to visa restrictions.

Please note that meeting the typical offer/minimum requirement does not guarantee that you will receive an offer.

  • medal-empty

    A level

    BBC including Biology or Human Biology grade B or Double Award Applied Science at grade BB including the practical endorsement of any science qualifications taken.

  • medal-empty GCSE

    Mathematics grade C

  • medal-empty Access to HE Diploma

    Access to Higher Education Diploma with 18 level 3 credits at distinction, 24 at merit and 3 at Pass, and to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits in particular subjects at distinction or merit grade.

  • medal-empty BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

    The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis. Subjects likely to be acceptable are Applied Science, Biomedical Science and Medical Science. Typical offers when made are Distinction, Distinction, Merit. Please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

  • medal-empty International Baccalaureate

    Distinction, Distinction, Merit

  • International Foundation Programme

    Pass all components of the University of Kent International Foundation Programme with a 60% overall average including 60% in Skills for Bioscientists, Fundamentals of Human Biology and Life Sciences (plus 50% in LZ013 Maths and Statistics if you do not hold GCSE Maths at 4/C or equivalent).

English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you do not meet our English language requirements, we offer a number of 'pre-sessional' courses in English for Academic Purposes. You attend these courses before starting your degree programme.

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Course structure

Duration: 4 years full-time

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  

On most programmes, you study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also be able to take ‘elective’ modules from other programmes so you can customise your programme and explore other subjects that interest you.

Stage 1

Compulsory modules currently include

This course will provide an introduction to biomolecules in living matter. The simplicity of the building blocks of macromolecules (amino acids, monosaccharides, fatty acids and purine and pyrimidine bases) will be contrasted with the enormous variety and adaptability that is obtained with the different macromolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids). The nature of the electronic and molecular structure of macromolecules and the role of non-covalent interactions in an aqueous environment will be highlighted. The unit will be delivered though lectures, formative practicals and related feedback sessions to ensure students fully understand what is expected of them. Short tests (formative assessment) will be used throughout the unit to test students' knowledge and monitor that the right material has been extracted from the lectures.

Find out more about BIOS3000

This course aims to introduce the 'workers' present in all cells – enzymes, and their role in the chemical reactions that make life possible.

The fundamental characteristics of enzymes will be discussed – that they are types of protein that act as catalysts to speed up reactions, or make unlikely reactions more likely. Methods for analysis of enzymic reactions will be introduced (enzyme kinetics). Control of enzyme activity, and enzyme inhibition will be discussed.

Following on from this the pathways of intermediary metabolism will be introduced. Enzymes catalyse many biochemical transformations in living cells, of which some of the most fundamental are those which capture energy from nutrients. Energy capture by the breakdown (catabolism) of complex molecules and the corresponding formation of NADH, NADPH, FADH2 and ATP will be described. The central roles of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in aerobic metabolism will be detailed. The pathways used in animals for catabolism and biosynthesis (anabolism) of some carbohydrates and fat will be covered, as well as their control. Finally how humans adapt their metabolism to survive starvation will be discussed.

Find out more about BIOS3010

This module addresses key themes and experimental techniques in molecular and cellular illustrated by examples from a range of microbes animals and plants . It covers basic cell structure, and organisation including organelles and their functions, cytoskeleton, cell cycle control and cell division. The control of all living processes by genetic mechanisms is introduced and an opportunity to handle and manipulate genetic material provided in the laboratory. Monitoring of students' knowledge and progress will be provided by a multi-choice test and the laboratory report, with feedback.

Functional Geography of Cells: Introduction to cell organisation, variety and cell membranes. Molecular traffic in cells. Organelles involved in energy and metabolism. Eukaryotic cell cycle. Chromosome structure & cell division. Meiosis and recombination. Cytoskeleton.

Molecular biology: The structure and function of genetic material. Chromosomes, chromatin structure, mutations, DNA replication, DNA repair and recombination, Basic mechanisms of transcription, mRNA processing and translation.

Techniques in molecular and cellular biology: Methods in cell Biology - light and electron microscopy; cell culture, fractionation and protein isolation/electrophoresis; antibodies, radiolabelling. Gene Cloning – vectors, enzymes, ligation, transformation, screening; hybridisation, probes and blots, PCR, DNA sequencing. Applications of recombinant DNA technology.

Laboratory: PCR amplification of DNA and gel analysis.

Find out more about BIOS3020

This module will consider the anatomy and function of normal tissues, organs and systems and then describe their major pathophysiological conditions. It will consider the aetiology of the condition, its biochemistry and its manifestation at the level of cells, tissues and the whole patient. It may also cover the diagnosis and treatment of the disease condition.

Indicative topics will include:

Cells and tissues

Membrane dynamics

Cell communication and homeostasis

Introduction to the nervous system

The cardiovascular system

The respiratory system

The immune system and inflammation

Blood cells and clotting

The Urinary system

The digestive system, liver and pancreas

Find out more about BIOS3070

Subject-based and communication skills are relevant to all the bioscience courses. This module allows you to become familiar with practical skills, the analysis and presentation of biological data and introduces some basic mathematical and statistical skills as applied to biological problems. It also introduces you to the computer network and its applications and covers essential skills such as note-taking and essay writing.

Find out more about BIOS3080

This module is an introduction to Mendelian genetics, and it will also address human pedigrees, quantitative genetics, and mechanisms of evolution.

Find out more about BIOS3240

Optional modules may include

Students with A2 Chemistry (equivalent) on entry take Phases 2+3+4

Biology students with A2 Chemistry (or equivalent) will obtain additional chemical concepts (Phase 4) as their chemistry qualification at A2 will already furnish them with concepts from Phase 1. All students will participate in the core section: Phase 2.

Phases 2+3+4 students will use the Phase 1 coursework test as a formative assessment to recognise their required chemical knowledgebase as obtained at A2 level. This provides an opportunity to identify students requiring additional support.

This module links to Biological Chemistry A with identically designed phases (1, 2 and 3) to maximise teaching efficiency across all programs in the School of Biosciences.

Phase 2: Autumn Term (9 lectures, 2 x 2 hr Workshop, 3 extra support lectures)

Chemical and biochemical thermodynamics. Topics covered are: (i) energetic and work, (ii) enthalpy, entropy and the laws of thermodynamics (iii) Gibbs free energy, equilibrium and spontaneous reactions, (iv) Chemical and biochemical equilibrium (including activity versus concentration and Le Chatelier's principle). The two hour workshop is designed to be delivered as small group sessions to cover the applications and practice of thermodynamics concepts.

Chemistry applied to biological concepts: bonding, valence, hybridisation as well as biological applied thermodynamic process (biomolecular association/dissociation).

Assessment feedback (1 session/lecture)

Phase 3: Spring Term (17 lectures, 2 x 2 hr workshop)

Fundamental organic chemistry with biological examples. Topics covered: (i) Introduction and basic functional chemistry, (ii) Isomerism and stereochemistry, (iii) Reaction mechanisms, (iv) Alkanes/alkyl halides/alkenes/alkynes, (v) Aromatic compounds, (vi) Heterocyclic compounds, (vii) Amines and alcohols (viii) Carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids and (ix) Biological inorganic chemistry. The two workshops is designed to be delivered as small group sessions to cover the applications of reaction mechanisms and reaction schemes.

Phase 4: Spring Term (8 lectures, 2 x 1 hr workshop)

Find out more about BIOS3220

Students without A2 Chemistry (equivalent) on entry take Phases 1+2+3

N.B. Students with A2 Chemistry or equivalent below grade C will follow Phases 1+2+3

This approach allows fundamental concepts (Phase 1) to be taught to non-A2 Chemistry students. All students will participate in the core section: Phase 2.

This module links to Biological Chemistry A with identically designed phases (1, 2 and 3) to maximise teaching efficiency across all programs in the School of Biosciences.

Phase 1: Autumn Term (5 lectures, 6 x 2 hr Workshops)

Basic chemical concepts for biology will be taught and applied through examples in a workshop atmosphere. The five workshop topics covered are: (i) Atoms and states of matter (ii) valence and bonding (iii) basic organic chemistry for biologists (iv) molecular shapes and isomerism in biology and (iv) chemical reactivity and chemical equations.

Assessment feedback of basic chemistry (1 session/lecture)

Phase 2: Autumn Term (9 lectures, 2 x 2 hr Workshop, 3 extra support lectures)

Chemical and biochemical thermodynamics. Topics covered are: (i) energetic and work, (ii) enthalpy, entropy and the laws of thermodynamics (iii) Gibbs free energy, equilibrium and spontaneous reactions, (iv) Chemical and biochemical equilibrium (including activity versus concentration and Le Chatelier's principle). The two hour workshop is designed to be delivered as small group sessions to cover the applications and practice of thermodynamics concepts.

Chemistry applied to biological concepts: bonding, valence, hybridisation as well as biological applied thermodynamic process (biomolecular association/dissociation).

Assessment feedback (1 session/lecture)

Phase 3: Spring Term (17 lectures, 2 x 2 hr workshop)

Fundamental organic chemistry with biological examples. Topics covered: (i) Introduction and basic functional chemistry, (ii) Isomerism and stereochemistry, (iii) Reaction mechanisms, (iv) Alkanes/alkyl halides/alkenes/alkynes, (v) Aromatic compounds, (vi) Heterocyclic compounds, (vii) Amines and alcohols (viii) Carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids and (ix) Biological inorganic chemistry. The two workshops is designed to be delivered as small group sessions to cover the applications of reaction mechanisms and reaction schemes.

Find out more about BIOS3221

Stage 2

Compulsory modules currently include

This module will consider the anatomy and function of the immune system and immunopathology and then consider the diseases and microorganisms that affect the different organs and tissues of the human body. Indicative topics will include inflammation, innate and adaptive immunity to pathogens, immune defence mechanisms against bacterial, viral and parasitic infections, antibody classes and functions, antigen processing and presentation, complement, the generation of antibody diversity, cell communication and immunopathology, including autoimmunity, hypersensitivity and transplant rejection. In the medical microbiology section of the module, indicative topics will include epidemiology, virology, parasitology, fungal infections, skin infections, GI tract infections, CNS infections, respiratory tract infections, UTI and STD infections.

Find out more about BIOS5050

Reproductive System: Male and female reproductive systems; Endocrine control of reproduction; Fertilisation; Early embryogenesis; Pregnancy and Parturition; Reproductive disorders.

Muscle: Muscle types: skeletal, smooth and cardiac; Structure of muscle; Molecular basis of contraction; Regulation of contraction including neural control; Energy requirements of muscle; Types of movement: reflex, voluntary, rhythmic; Muscle disorders.

Nervous System: Cells of the nervous system- neurons and glia; Electrical properties of neurons- action potential generation and conduction; Synaptic structure and function- transmitters and receptors; Structural organization of the central nervous system (CNS) and function of individual regions; Organization and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS)- somatic motor, autonomic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) and sensory; Sensory systems- vision, hearing, taste, smell, pain. Disorders of the nervous system.

Endocrine System: Endocrine glands; Classes of hormones; Mechanisms of hormone action; Regulation of hormone release; Endocrine disorders.

Find out more about BIOS5130

Introduction and basic principles of drug action: key drug targets including major receptor subtypes, ion channels, transporters, and structure-function relationships

Systems pharmacology: the biological basis of diseases states affecting different physiological systems, therapeutic approaches to treating these diseases, and the cellular/molecular mode of action of drugs used. Indicative diseases may include hypertension, asthma, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, infertility, depression and anxiety.

Find out more about BIOS5140

This module covers the general principles of metabolic disorders and focuses on pathways, enzyme mechanisms, and diseases associated with defects in metabolism.

Find out more about BIOS5200

This module introduces students to clinical biochemistry and cellular pathology, and molecular pathology.

Students learn about the principles of and procedures for a wide variety of techniques employed in modern laboratory medicine. Students practice integration and practical application of this knowledge throughout the module using diagnostic case study analyses. The clinical biochemistry section is organised anatomically. The cellular and molecular pathology section is organised according to laboratory medicine specialities, with particular emphasis placed on the detection and diagnosis of cancer in the NHS. Quality assurance, governance and regulatory systems relevant to UK laboratory medicine are introduced.

Find out more about BIOS5250

Communication Skills in Biosciences: Essay writing, oral presentations, laboratory reports, the scientific literature and literature reviews. Working in groups.

Techniques in Biomolecular Science: Immunochemistry. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibody production, immuno-chromatography, ELISA and RIA. Electrophoresis, Immunoblotting, Protein Determination, Activity Assays, Purification.

Computing for Biologists: Bioinformatics, phylogenetic trees, database searches for protein/DNA sequences.

Mini-project – introduction to research skills: Students will work in groups of eight to undertake directed experimental work (Group Project) before extending the project further through self-directed experiments working as a pair (Mini Project).

Careers: The programme will be delivered by the Careers Advisory Service and will review the types of careers available for bioscience students. The sessions will incorporate personal skills, careers for bioscience graduates, records of achievement, curriculum vitae preparation, vacation work, postgraduate study, interview skills and action planning.

Find out more about BIOS5320

The module deals with the molecular mechanisms underlying the ecological, medical, scientific and commercial importance of microorganisms (including prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms). This involves descriptions of how microbial genetic information is stored in DNA, how that information is decoded by the cell and how this flow of information is controlled in response to changes in environment. The Module also discusses microbial interaction with humans and the environment. Throughout the module, the mechanisms in prokaryotes and eukaryotes will be compared and contrasted and will touch on the latest tool development in microbiology.

Find out more about BIOS5480

Optional modules may include

The module deals with the molecular mechanisms of gene expression and its regulation in organisms ranging from viruses to man. This involves descriptions of how genetic information is stored in DNA and RNA, how that information is decoded by the cell and how this flow of information is controlled in response to changes in environment or developmental stage. Throughout, the mechanisms in prokaryotes and eukaryotes will be compared and contrasted and will touch on the latest developments in how we can analyse gene expression, and what these developments have revealed.

Find out more about BIOS5010

The cell is the fundamental structural unit in living organisms. Eukaryotic cells are compartmentalized structures that like prokaryotic cells, must perform several vital functions such as energy production, cell division and DNA replication and also must respond to extracellular environmental cues. In multicellular organisms, certain cells have developed modified structures, allowing them to fulfil highly specialised roles. This module reviews the experimental approaches that have been taken to investigate the biology of the cell and highlights the similarities and differences between cells of complex multicellular organisms and microbial cells. Initially the functions of the cytoskeleton and certain cellular compartments, particularly the nucleus, are considered. Later in the unit, the mechanisms by which newly synthesised proteins are secreted or shuttled to their appropriate cellular compartments are examined.

Find out more about BIOS5030

This module will cover the following areas:

* Principles of metabolic regulation: Allostery, cooperativity, phosphorylation, and hormonal control. Metabolic regulation in response to cellular energy status. Transcriptional regulation.

* Plant metabolism: Photosynthesis and carbon fixation.

* Microbial metabolism: Nitrogen metabolism, stress responses, metals, and secondary metabolites.

* Metabolism in biotechnology: Manipulating microbial metabolism for the production of useful compounds. Manipulating mammalian cell metabolism in biotechnology.

Find out more about BIOS5210

Year in industry

Biomedical Science offers the possibility of doing a one-year placement away from the University between Stages 2 and 3. Sandwich placements provide an excellent opportunity to gain relevant work experience, usually in the pharmaceutical industry or a research institute. These placements can be in the UK or abroad. You are paid by your employer and produce an independent research project.

On a sandwich placement you acquire additional skills and gain first-hand experience of a particular type of work, which will help to inform your career decisions at the end of your degree. Students have worked at companies including: GlaxoSmithKline MedImmune, Lonza, BASF, Eli Lilly and Bayer Crop Science.

Progression: To progress to stage 2 you must achieve an overall average of 65% in Stage 1 unless you applied before July and met the conditions of the entry offer made. If the 65% requirement is not met, you will be transferred to the equivalent 3-year programme which is identical except for the year spent away from the University.

Compulsory modules currently include

A placement typically is a 9-12 month internship with a commercial or public sector or charity organisation which provides opportunities for the student to develop graduate level subject-specific and generic employability skills. Choice of placement by student will be guided and facilitated at UoK with the learning outcomes listed above in mind. It is requested by UoK that the student be closely guided in work (usually with a named supervisor) involving specialist training. Placements are expected to have a scientific research focus and incorporate a project element that may be written up as a scientific report, however, the specific type of work undertaken may vary significantly from placement to placement. The research project should occupy not less than thirty percent of the sandwich year.

Find out more about BIOS7970

Stage 3

Compulsory modules currently include

Projects are designed by individual members of staff in keeping with their research interests and fall into one of four categories:

• Wet/Dry Laboratory and Computing: practical research undertaken in the teaching laboratories, or on computers followed by preparation of a written report

• Dissertation: library-based research leading to production of a report in the style of a scientific review

• Business: development of a biotechnology business plan

• Communication: similar to dissertation projects but with an emphasis on presenting the scientific topic to a general, non-scientist audience

Find out more about BIOS6000

Eukaryotic pathogens; mechanisms of pathogenesis; transmission and diversity

Bacterial pathogens: virulence factors including toxins and adhesins.

Viral pathogens: mechanisms of pathogenesis and avoidance mechanisms; viruses and cancer.

Human fungal pathogens: mechanisms of transmission and epidemiology; virulence factors; host resistance mechanisms

Find out more about BIOS6060

The aim of this Advanced Immunology module is to review topical aspects of advanced immunology with emphasis on the regulation of the immune response, and the role of dysfunctional immune systems in the aetiology of a variety of disease states. Indicative topics include antigen processing and presentation, transplant rejection, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, cell migration homing and extravasation, cytokines, tumour immunology, mucosal immunology and autophagy.

Find out more about BIOS6220

This module describes the anatomy, physiology, pathology of the blood and blood forming tissues. It covers a wide range of disorders including haematological malignancies. Blood transfusion theory and practice are introduced. Roles for haematopoietic stem cells during blood cell development and as therapeutic agents are discussed. Students will be exposed to ethical and regulatory concerns with regard to transfusion and blood cell therapies.

Find out more about BIOS6270

Optional modules may include

Recent events have illustrated the importance of ensuring that science is communicated effectively to non-scientific audiences. This module considers best practice in science communication, making use of case studies that illustrate its importance in developing an informed and empowered public, while developing skills in different modes of communication that enhance future employability.

Find out more about BIOS6003

The module begins by overviewing the diverse mechanisms used by cells to communicate, considering the main modes of cell-cell communication, the major classes of signalling molecules and the receptor types upon which they act. It then focuses on nuclear, G-protein coupled, and enzyme linked receptors covering in molecular detail these receptors and their associated signal transduction pathways.

Find out more about BIOS6020

Cells and subcellular compartments are separated from the external milieu by lipid membranes with protein molecules inserted into the lipid layer. The aim of this module is to develop understanding of both the lipid and protein components of membranes as dynamic structures whose functions are integrated in cellular processes.

Find out more about BIOS6040

The module will develop understanding and analytical skills in virology, based around interactive seminars wherein students will analyse, present, and discuss the relevant research literature. The students will gain experience in scientific design, literature analysis, scientific communication, and the analysis of experimental data.

Find out more about BIOS6200

This module will cover the following:

• Outline of microbial physiology and genetics

• Microbial metabolism and homeostasis

• Control of microbial physiology through gene expression regulation – Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression

• Experimental approaches used to study microbial genomes and gene expression

• Microbial biodiversity and complex signalling in the environment

Find out more about BIOS6280

Bioinformatics Data sources & Sequence analysis: Databases and data availability. Using sequence data for analysis – sequence searching methods, multiple sequence alignments, residue conservation, Protein domains and families.

Protein Bioinformatics Methods: Protein structure and function prediction. Prediction of binding sites/interfaces with small ligands and with other proteins. Bioinformatics analyses using protein data.

Genomics: An introduction to the analysis of genomic data, primarily focussing on the data available from genome sequencing – how it can be used to study genetic variants and compare genomes (i.e. comparative and functional genomics).

Find out more about BIOS6380

Cancer formation and progression; underlying factors, cancer cell heterogeneity, uncontrolled cell division, invasive growth/metastasis formation.

The Molecular Biology of Cancer: (Proto-)oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, cell cycle control, cell death.

Cancer therapies

Find out more about BIOS6420

The module deals with basic neuroanatomy and molecular and cellular neurobiology, such as transmission of signals within the nervous system and sensory perception. It explores more complex functions of the nervous system, e.g. behavioural and cognitive functions including learning, memory, emotions and appetite control. Throughout the module both the normal nervous system and disorders that arise as a consequence of abnormalities will be covered.

Find out more about BIOS6430

The module provides a detailed molecular basis for the ageing process. It reviews the organisms and experimental methods used to study ageing, and discusses the findings of this work to provide both knowledge and context to the process of ageing.

Topics may include: Importance and principles of ageing research

Why do organisms age and theories of ageing

Overview of processes and pathways controlling ageing

How ageing and lifespan is measured.

Signalling pathways that control ageing

Diseases of ageing

Ethics of ageing research

There will be two workshops: Workshop 1: Data analysis session (whole class or 2-3 groups).

Workshop 2: Group discussion of key ageing research paper(s) (small groups ).

Find out more about BIOS6440

This module is designed to provide students across the university with access to knowledge, skill development and training in the field of entrepreneurship with a special emphasis on developing a business plan in order to exploit identified opportunities. Hence, the module will be of value for students who aspire to establishing their own business and/or introducing innovation through new product, service, process, project or business development in an established organisation. The module complements students' final year projects in Computing, Law, Biosciences, Electronics, Multimedia, and Drama etc.

Find out more about BUSN6120

Fees

The 2022/23 annual tuition fees for UK undergraduate courses have not yet been set by the UK Government. As a guide only the 2021/2022 fees for this course were £9,250.

  • Home full-time TBC
  • EU full-time £15900
  • International full-time £21200

For details of when and how to pay fees and charges, please see our Student Finance Guide.

For students continuing on this programme, fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* 

Your fee status

The University will assess your fee status as part of the application process. If you are uncertain about your fee status you may wish to seek advice from UKCISA before applying.

Fees for Year in Industry

The 2022/23 annual tuition fees for UK undergraduate courses have not yet been set by the UK Government. As a guide only full-time tuition fees for Home and EU undergraduates for 2021/22 entry are £1,385.

Fees for Year Abroad

The 2022/23 annual tuition fees for UK undergraduate courses have not yet been set by the UK Government. As a guide only full-time tuition fees for Home and EU undergraduates for 2021/22 entry are £1,385.

Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. 

Additional costs

General additional costs

Find out more about accommodation and living costs, plus general additional costs that you may pay when studying at Kent.

Funding

University funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. See our funding page for more details. 

Government funding

You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

Scholarships

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. 

The scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of A*AA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications (including BTEC and IB) as specified on our scholarships pages.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching includes lectures, laboratory classes, workshops, problem-solving sessions and tutorials. You have an Academic Adviser who you meet with at regular intervals to discuss your progress, and most importantly, to identify ways in which you can improve your work further so that you reach your full potential.

Most modules are assessed by a combination of continuous assessment and end-of-year exams. Exams take place at the end of the academic year and count for 50% or more of the module mark. Stage 1 assessments do not contribute to the final degree classification, but all stage 2 and 3 assessments do, meaning that your final degree award is an average of many different components. On average, 26% of your time is spent in an activity led by an academic; the rest of your time is for independent study.

The Sandwich Year is assessed by a presentation and a written report and contributes 10% to the overall mark.

Contact hours

For a student studying full time, each academic year of the programme will comprise 1200 learning hours which include both direct contact hours and private study hours.  The precise breakdown of hours will be subject dependent and will vary according to modules.  Please refer to the individual module details under Course Structure.

Methods of assessment will vary according to subject specialism and individual modules.  Please refer to the individual module details under Course Structure.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • instil a sense of enthusiasm for biomedical science, confront the scientific, moral plus ethical questions and engage in critical assessment of the subject material
  • provide an understanding of scientific investigation of human health and disease
  • provide a stimulating, research-active environment in which students are supported and motivated to achieve their academic and personal potential
  • educate students in the theoretical and practical aspects of biomedical science
  • facilitate the learning experience through various teaching and assessment methods
  • give students the experience of undertaking an independent research project
  • prepare students for further study, or training, and employment in science and non-science based careers, by developing transferable and cognitive skills
  • develop the qualities needed for employment in situations requiring the exercise of professionalism, independent thought, personal responsibility and decision making in complex and unpredictable circumstances
  • provide access to as wide a range of students as practicable
  • provide an opportunity to gain experience as a biomedical scientist working in a professional environment such as hospital, government and industrial research laboratories
  • to develop employment skills, including an understanding of how you relate to the structure and function of an organisation, via the sandwich year.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • the structure, function and control of the human body
  • the main metabolic pathways used in biological systems in catabolism and anabolism, understanding biological reactions in chemical terms
  • the variety of mechanisms by which metabolic pathways can be controlled and the way that they can be co-ordinated with changes in the physiological environment
  • the genetic organisation of various types of organism and the way in which genes can be expressed and their expression controlled
  • molecular genetic techniques and the causes and consequences of alterations of genetic material
  • the structure and function of the main classes of macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids and polysaccharides
  • the immune response in health and disease
  • the structure, physiology, biochemistry, classification and control of microorganisms
  • the main principles of cell and molecular biology, biochemistry and microbiology
  • the microscopic examination of cells (cytology) and tissues (histology) for indicators of disease
  • the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of analytes to aid the diagnosis, screening and monitoring of health and disease (clinical biochemistry).
  • immunological disease/disorders
  • the different elements that constitute blood in normal and diseased states (haematology)
  • the identification of blood group antigens and antibodies (immunohaematology and transfusion science)
  • pathogenic microorganisms
  • the main methods for communicating information on biomedical sciences
  • the way that a professional biomedical scientist can contribute to the organisation in which they work.

Intellectual skills

You gain the following intellectual abilities:

  • understand the scope of teaching methods and study skills relevant to the biomedical sciences degree programme
  • understand the concepts and principles in outcomes recognising and applying biomedical specific theories, paradigms, concepts or principles. For example, the relationship between biochemical activity and disease
  • acquire the skills for analysis, synthesis, summary and presentation of biomedical information.
  • demonstrate competence in solving extended biomedical problems involving advanced data manipulation and comprehension using biomedical specific and transferable skills
  • integrate scientific evidence, to formulate and test hypotheses
  • structure, develop and defend complex scientific arguments
  • plan, execute and interpret data from a short research project
  • recognise the moral and ethical issues of biomedical investigations and appreciate the need for ethical standards and professional codes of conduct.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in the following:

  • to handle, biological material and chemicals in a safe way, thus being able to assess any potential hazards associated with biomedical experimentation
  • perform risk assessments prior to the execution of an experimental protocol
  • to use basic and advanced experimental equipment in executing the core practical techniques used by biomedical scientists
  • to find information on biomedical topics from a wide range of information resources and maintain an effective information retrieval strategy
  • plan, execute and assess the results from experiments using acquired subject-specific knowledge
  • identify the best method for presenting and reporting on biomedical investigations using written, data manipulation/presentation and computer skills.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in the following:

  • the ability to receive and respond to a variety of sources of information
  • communicate effectively to a variety of audiences using a range of formats and approaches
  • problem-solve by a variety of methods, especially numerical, including the use of computers
  • use the internet and other electronic sources critically as a means of communication and as a source of information
  • interpersonal and teamwork skills that allow you to identify individual and collective goals, and recognise and respect the views and opinions of others
  • self-management and organisational skills and the capacity to support life-long learning
  • awareness of information sources for assessing and planning future career development
  • function effectively in a working environment.

Independent rankings

Biological Sciences at Kent scored 87% overall in The Complete University Guide 2022. It was also ranked 10th for research intensity.

Careers

Graduate destinations

Our recent graduates have gone on to careers including:

  • healthcare in the NHS
  • medical research based in academic, government, industrial and medical labs
  • biotechnology
  • teaching
  • industry and commerce
  • scientific publishing
  • marketing
  • information technology.

Help finding a job

The School of Biosciences runs employability events with talks from alumni outlining their career paths since graduation.

The University also has a friendly Careers and Employability Service, which can give you advice on how to:

  • apply for jobs
  • write a good CV
  • perform well in interviews.

Career-enhancing skills

You graduate with an excellent grounding in scientific knowledge and extensive laboratory experience. In addition, you also develop the key transferable skills sought by employers, such as:

  • excellent communication skills
  • teamwork
  • the ability to analyse problems
  • time management.

You can also gain new skills by signing up for one of our Kent Extra activities, such as learning a language or volunteering.

Professional recognition

Our Biomedical Science degree programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) and the Royal Society of Biology (RSB). For future employers, this accreditation helps to demonstrate a wide-ranging scientific education with practical skills and experience.

Apply for this course

If you are from the UK or Ireland, you must apply for this course through UCAS. If you are not from the UK or Ireland, you can choose to apply through UCAS or directly on our website.

Find out more about how to apply

All applicants

Apply through UCAS

International applicants

Apply now to Kent

Contact us

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United Kingdom/EU enquiries

Enquire online for full-time study

E: study-bio@kent.ac.uk 

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International student enquiries

Enquire online

T: +44 (0)1227 823254
E: internationalstudent@kent.ac.uk

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School website

School of Biosciences

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