Global Capitalism and the Novel - EN722

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2017-18 2018-19
Canterbury Spring
View Timetable
6 30 (15) DR B Abu Manneh

Pre-requisites

None

Restrictions

Not available as wild

2017-18

Overview

This module examines the relationship between global capitalism and the novel since the 1980s. By arguing for the centrality of capital and class in the understanding of contemporary post-colonial literature, it reveals how a vibrant global realism has emerged that speaks to the new urban realities of massive rural migration to the city, exploding slum life, and more polarized class inequalities in the global South. It will explore how neoliberal globalization both makes possible and is critiqued by new realist narratives of abjection and resistance from across the global South, especially from India, Nigeria, South Africa, Martinique, Chile, and Egypt.

Details

This module appears in:


Contact hours

There will be ten 3 hour seminars.

Method of assessment

This module can be taken by standard coursework route OR by dissertation. NB: students can only take ONE MODULE by dissertation in stage 3.

Module by standard coursework:
100% coursework: seminar performance (10%), two 3000 word essays (45% each).

Module by dissertation:
Assessment will be in the form of:
1) a 500-word dissertation proposal (formative assessment and non-marked)
2) a dissertation of 6000 words (90%)
3) seminar performance mark (in accordance with the criteria published in the School of English Undergraduate Handbook (10%)

Preliminary reading

Mike Davis, 2005. Planet of Slums (Verso)
Arundhati Roy, 2015. Capitalism: A Ghost Story (Haymarket)
Paulo Lin, 2006. City of God (Bloomsbury)
K. Sello Duiker, 2000. Thirteen Cents (Ohio University Press)
Chris Abani, 2004. Graceland (Picador)

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes.
On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1.think critically about global capitalism and the novel
2.think historically about the development of the novel form
3.compare texts from different geographic locations
4.connect politics with aesthetics

The intended generic learning outcomes.
On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1.apply the skills needed for academic study and enquiry
2.synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice;
3.frame oral criticism of creative work sensitively and constructively and to digest it to good effect
4.demonstrate powers of communication and the capacity to argue a point of view, orally and in written form, with clarity, organisation and cogency
5.demonstrate enhanced confidence in the efficient presentation of ideas designed to stimulate critical debate
6.demonstrate competence in the planning and execution of essays and project-work and in the conception, planning, execution and editing of individual creative work
7.demonstrate enhanced skills in collaborative work, including more finely tuned listening and questioning skills
8.understand, interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical positions and weigh the importance of alternative perspectives

In addition, students taking the module by dissertation will be able to:
9.marshal complex knowledge and present it clearly and logically in the substantive form of a dissertation

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