Infection and Immunity - BI505

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2019-20
Canterbury
(version 2)
Spring
View Timetable
5 15 (7.5) DR E Curling

Pre-requisites

Before taking this module you must take BI307 Human Physiology and Disease

Restrictions

Stage 2 students only

2019-20

Overview

This module will consider the anatomy and function of the immune system and immunopathology and then consider the diseases and microorganisms that affect the different organs and tissues of the human body. Indicative topics will include inflammation, innate and adaptive immunity to pathogens, immune defence mechanisms against bacterial, viral and parasitic infections, antibody classes and functions, antigen processing and presentation, complement, the generation of antibody diversity, cell communication and immunopathology, including autoimmunity, hypersensitivity and transplant rejection. In the medical microbiology section of the module, indicative topics will include epidemiology, virology, parasitology, fungal infections, skin infections, GI tract infections, CNS infections, respiratory tract infections, UTI and STD infections.

Details

This module appears in:


Contact hours

Total contact hours: 26
Private study hours: 124
Total study hours: 150

Method of assessment

Immunology assessment, 1500 words (22.5%)
Lab Practical Report (22.5%)
Examination, 2 hr (55%)

Indicative reading

Murphy, K., Janeway's Immunobiology, 9th Edition, Garland Science, 2017.
Owen, Punt and Stranford, Kuby Immunology, 7th Edition, Macmillan, 2013.
Mims' Medical Microbiology, 5th Edition, Mosby, 2012.

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes.
On successfully completing the module students will be able to have a knowledge and understanding of:

The major immune system functions and components, how cell-cell communication controls immune responsiveness to infectious agents and immunopathology.
Microorganisms of medical importance and the diseases they cause.
How the spread of disease occurs in the human population.
Experimental procedures in handling and identifying bacteria in samples provided to the students during the practical class.
Microbiological and immunological techniques used to identify pathogens and immune cells
Methods of data acquisition analysis and presentation as evidenced by the practical report assessment.

The intended generic learning outcomes.
On successfully completing the module students will be able to have a knowledge and understanding of:

Interpretation and retrieval of relevant information.
Analysis and evaluation of data.
Written communication skills.

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