Students preparing for their graduation ceremony at Canterbury Cathedral

History and Philosophy of Art - MA

2018

This is the only MA programme in History and Philosophy of Art offered by a British university in Paris and taught in English.

2018

Overview

It provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art and is intended for graduates in art history, philosophy and related subjects, such as fine art. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level and within an interdisciplinary context, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art. 

You spend the entire year in the French capital, which allows you to participate in excursions to prominent cultural locations and make use of research resources that are only available in Paris. You have the unique opportunity to study the arts at postgraduate level within the context of a city that has been at the very centre of many crucial artistic and art theoretical developments in the past few centuries.

Students interested in taking this MA as a part-time option would take two modules each year (one per term), plus the dissertation in the final year. The programme can also be studied in Canterbury only or with the year shared between Canterbury and Paris.

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History of Art Department within the School of Arts provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, the history and philosophy of portraiture, the historiography of art and the Cold War, biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Studying art as a postgraduate at the University of Kent in Paris will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise and participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives.

For further information on this programme please contact Eileen Hartney at E.Hartney-204@kent.ac.uk.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Arts at Kent was ranked 1st for research power and in the top 20 in the UK for research quality.

An impressive 98% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Modules

The programme will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. The core compulsory modules are: 

  • Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art
  • Modern Art in Paris
  • Dissertation

In order to allow you to explore other subject areas that interest you will have the option to take one of the modules from other programmes that are on offer at the Paris campus:

  • From the Idea of a City to Philosophies of Urban Design
  • Architecture and Cities 1840s-1960s
  • Modernism and Paris
  • Film and Modernity
  • Paris and the European Enlightenment
  • Identity, Trauma and Sexuality in Modern French Literature
  • Paris: Reality and Representation
  • Best of Enemies: Images of Britain and France in the 19th and 20th Centuries
  • Religion and European Thought
Modules may include Credits

This module will introduce you to key concepts and classic texts that are central to understand fundamental debates in history and philosophy of art as well as art criticism. Some examples of key concepts are the notion of representation, intention, style, influence, the aesthetic, fiction, beauty, etc.; and some examples of texts are Wollheim's Painting as Art, Schapiro's The Apples of Cezanne, Baxandall's Patterns of Intention, Walton's Categories of Art, Barthes' Camera Lucida, Danto's After the End of Art. The module will be team-taught by historians and philosophers of art, the texts and/or key concepts discussed in the seminars are subject to change.

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The module will focus on Paris as a centre of artistic experimentation. The city served as the launch pad for key artistic movements from the mid-19th century through to the period after the Second World War (Impressionism, Cubism, Surrealism, etc.), and as a magnet for budding and established artists from all around the world. The module will take advantage of the great museum collections that encapsulate such developments (Musées d'Arte Moderne and d’Orsay, Rodin and Picasso Museums, Beaubourg, Quai Branly, etc.) and also of the major exhibitions on show in Paris in any given year.

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This module, to be taught at the Paris School of Arts and Culture, looks at Paris' revolutionary and resistance past. We cover a two-hundred-year period, beginning with the revolution of 1789 and ending with the student protests of May 1968. We will explore Paris during the two world wars, the Commune of 1871, the 1848 revolution and advances in medicine, science, painting and literature.

The aim of this module is to examine the ways in which Parisian culture, which has long been at the centre of innovation in the fields of architecture, film, literature, art, philosophy and drama, has been transformative. The module is interdisciplinary and will include the analysis of memoirs, oral histories, memorials, instruments, paintings, literary texts, cartoons, posters, film, newspapers, radio and the internet.

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From the French Revolution to the European Union, the term 'Europe' has long been a placeholder for a large number of utopian, internationalist aspirations. These aspirations are necessarily culturally and politically contingent; to trace the history of cultural constructions of Europe is to hold a mirror up to its changing intellectual faces. Focusing on a series of influential texts published at significant moments in the recent history of the continent, this module investigates how the changing ‘idea of Europe’ reflects the changing priorities of cultural discourse. In particular, it considers the key role – but also contested – played by Paris in particular as a European cultural capital, central to the idea of Europe and to the development of European culture. The texts studied on this module range across disciplines and genres, and include poems and pamphlets, essays and lectures, philosophy and politics. Through studying these texts in their socio-political contexts, the idea of Europe is triangulated through reference to a number of key categories (e.g. ‘prophecy’; ‘crisis’; ‘utopia’; Europe as ‘conservative’; Europe as ‘progressive’). The overall aim of this module is to explore what it means to be – in Friedrich Nietzsche’s words – a ‘good European’, and to consider the central role played by Paris in the emergence of modern European culture.

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In recent decades European intellectual culture has seen a turn towards the post-secular, the post-critical, the “return” of religion, or, as Claude Lefort described it “the permanency of the theologico-political”. Such gestures invite a rethinking of the political, social, and intellectual role of “religion” in the recent history of European thought. Such reworking intimately affects the understanding of Europe within a scene of global political and economic development, European traditions of philosophy, concepts of political autonomy; its critical theories of culture and economy, links between the idea of Europe and democratic political foundations; and the nature of artistic, social, and psychological exploration. This course creates capacities to interact with and to intervene in these important and on-going cultural discussions by developing new maps of “religion” as a central preoccupation in the formation of European intellectual identity, with a strong focus on Paris and the history of religion in “French theory” (e.g the works of Badiou, Benslama, Derrida and Foucault).

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This module explores the idea of the city, and the major concepts related to urban life. It analyses and determines the conditions of their emergence within a broader cultural context. It traces how these concepts have changed through time, with the aim of enhancing our present understanding of cities and their regeneration. It follows the development of city planning and the establishment of planned, ideal cities as a political goal up to the foundation of new towns. In its dealing with historically modern cities, the module centres on case studies of cities representative of urbanism from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, drawing lessons from the methods and types of documentation used in its development. The course also introduces the manner in which architecture has generated a number of spontaneous and critical responses to the demands of the city in the past four decades. The arguments are drawn from sources in architectural and urban theory, philosophy, art history, anthropology, literary sources and social sciences.

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This module explores the range of interrelations and negotiations that take place between verbal and visual culture, in literature, art, film, philosophy and, psychogeography. It will cover a diverse range of thinkers and approaches such as; Foucault, Merleau-Ponty, Bersani, Derrida, Debord, and Marx. The module is intended to be interdisciplinary and it will include some Paris-based visits, activities and screenings as a necessary means of working across themes, theories and ideas. It will consider some or all of the following themes, such as: the politics of space, ekphrasis and the other, phenomenological wonder, the legacy of Marx, and Marxist and formalist perspectives on modernism and the visual arts.

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This module is an introduction to writing fiction at a postgraduate level. The course content will vary depending on your tutor. You will have a weekly seminar in which you will discuss recently published novels and short fiction (alongside some modern classics) as well as techniques for writing your own fiction. You will also have the opportunity to present and work on your writing in class. You will hand in 7000 words of original fiction at the end of the module. This can be the beginning of a novel, or one or more short stories.

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This module will prepare you for the production of your dissertation portfolio of fully realised, finished poems. You will read a wide range of exemplary, contemporary work and experiment with form and content. A portfolio for the module of 12 – 15 poems is submitted.

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In this module you will learn further techniques of writing fiction, including how to plot a full-length novel, work on deep characterisation and the construction of an intellectual framework within your fiction. You may be continuing to work on a project begun in Fiction 1, or starting something new. Rather than expecting you to try new techniques, voices and styles, your tutor will work with you to identify your strongest mode of writing and will encourage you to develop this.

Your tutor will supply you with a reading list before the start of the module.

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The main focus of Poetry 2 is to further develop and refine your writing with the eventual aim of producing a successful dissertation portfolio of fully realised, finished poems. Poetry 2 differs from Poetry 1 in that you are encouraged to develop a sequence or series of wholly new poems.

In this module you will develop your practice of writing poetry through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and constructive feedback on your own work. Each week, you will be exposed to a wide range of exemplary, contemporary sequences. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical rather than historical; at every point priority is given to your own particular development as poets.

The reading list does not represent a curriculum as such, but indicates the range of works and traditions we will draw upon to stimulate new thought about your own work. Decisions about reading will be taken in response to individual interests. Likewise, you will be directed toward work which will be of particular benefit to you.

The main focus of Poetry 2 is to further develop and refine your writing with the eventual aim of producing a successful dissertation portfolio of fully realised, finished poems. Poetry 2 differs from Poetry 1 in that you are encouraged to develop a sequence or series of wholly new poems.

In this module you will develop your practice of writing poetry through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and constructive feedback on your own work. Each week, you will be exposed to a wide range of exemplary, contemporary sequences. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical rather than historical; at every point priority is given to your own particular development as poets.

The reading list does not represent a curriculum as such, but indicates the range of works and traditions we will draw upon to stimulate new thought about your own work. Decisions about reading will be taken in response to individual interests. Likewise, you will be directed toward work which will be of particular benefit to you.

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‘Paris: The Residency’ contributes to the poetry and prose strands of the MA in Creative Writing and the Literature strand of the Paris Programmes. The objective of ‘Paris: The Residency’ is to give students as close an experience as possible of what it might be like to be a writer in residence or retreat, and to produce work inspired by a specific location for a specific period of time. The emphasis will be on producing a body of creative work for the main assessment. This module aims to enable students to develop their practice of writing through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and practices, and constructive feedback on their own work. Throughout their stay, students will be exposed to a wide range of instances of exemplary, contemporary work relating to Paris, or which was written by writers whilst staying, or living in Paris (as suggested by the indicative reading list). They will be encouraged to read as independent writers, to apply appropriate writing techniques to their own practice and to experiment with voice, form and content. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical as well as historical. At every point in the module, priority will be given to students’ own development as writers. It is an assumption of the module that students will already have a basic competence in the writing of poetry or prose, including a grasp of essential craft and techniques. The purpose of this module will be to stimulate students towards further development of, and to hone their already emerging voices and styles through engaging with various literary texts, raising an awareness of place as the starting point for new writing, and how their work can develop with large chunks of time for independent study, reflection and exploration of a city like Paris.

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‘Modernism and Paris’ provides students with an opportunity to study a selection of texts from the UK, USA and mainland Europe, all readily available in English and specifically relevant to both Paris and modernism. The texts are all either inspired by Paris, or are set in, or refer significantly to the city and most were written in Paris. They are chosen for their high literary quality and because they seek new and experimental literary expressions for the experience of modern city life. They also allow exploration of a range of literary forms, including the novel, poetry, prose poems and essays. The module alternates texts by major authors of different nationalities, chronologically ordered, allowing students to appreciate the beginnings and development of modernism in the 19th and 20th centuries. The module recognises the importance of modernist cross-fertilisation between literature and the visual arts and encourages students to explore links between modernist literature and the development of, for example, cubism and surrealism. The primary materials are Paris-focused but are chosen to open an international perspective on literary and cultural contacts and history.

The module is taught mainly through a weekly two-hour seminar. Students are also encouraged to incorporate into their studies their exploration of the city and their use of relevant local resources such as exhibitions, museums and libraries.

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The ubiquity of the term diaspora in recent critical debates has been interpreted as the symptom of a shift in perspective in cultural and social studies. This is reflected in the growing significance of diaspora studies which, to some extent, has superseded postcolonial studies as a theoretical framework in explaining those global phenomena in society, culture and literature which are informed by conceptions of the nation state but cannot sufficiently be explained by them. At the same time, tendencies of universalising conceptions of diaspora as they have recently proliferated and the increasingly simplifying and historically undifferentiated usage of the term need to be reconsidered.

Among the various paradigms from which diasporic writing should be distinguished is the literature of exile. Exile is often the consequence of political pressure or disaffection with a society rather than the result of the larger and often spatially and chronologically extended migratory movements which led to the emergence of diasporic communities. While both paradigms may intersect, the concerns and motivations of diasporic and exilic literatures usually differ.

A historically and culturally significant geographical, and frequently also imaginary, point of intersection between the diasporic and the exilic paradigms is the metropolis of Paris. In this module, our comparative focus will be on diasporic and exilic literatures and on the significance of the diasporic or exilic space of the French metropolis, both as production context and as informing literary production.

Arguably, the most famous group of exiles to choose Paris as their temporary home was the generation of American expatriate writers in the 1920s for whom, as J. Gerald Kennedy suggests, Paris 'inescapably reflect[ed] the creation of an exilic self' – Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Djuna Barnes or, after the Second World War, Richard Wright, James Baldwin and Alexander Trocchi or Boris Vian. Other writers of note who, in different times and under different conditions, chose exile in Paris include Heinrich Heine, Oscar Wilde, Rainer Maria Rilke, Samuel Beckett, Heinrich Mann or Anna Seghers, Miguel Ángel Asturias, Czeslaw Milosz, Milan Kundera, Jorge Semprún and Marjane Satrapi or Julio Cortázar, Severo Sarduy, Vargas Llosa, Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Laura Alcoba, Assia Djebar, Nancy Houston and Leila Sebbar. Incorporating aesthetic dimensions, our seminars will explore in particular the extent to which experiences of diaspora and exile inform the work of ‘alien’ writers residing in Paris.

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This module covers the multifarious struggles of the last ten years as manifested, enacted and expressed in literary texts from the US, the UK, Ireland, Europe, the Middle East and elsewhere. Students will consider the ways in which contemporary literature is informed by, reflects upon, and intervenes in the political struggles unfolding in our historical moment. Anchoring the discussion in contemporary struggle in Paris, the module will then broaden out geographically and conceptually to elaborate the interconnections between immediate sites of resistance and more global phenomena.

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This course examines the medium of film, considering its specific qualities as an art-form and the particular ways in which it is influenced by and influences other artistic and cultural forms in the historical moment of early 20th century Paris. The emphasis of the course varies from year to year, responding to current research and scholarship, but it maintains as its focus the aesthetic strategies of film in contrast with other arts, film's relationship to historical change, particularly as it is developed in the growth of Paris as a city. The course also addresses the particular strategies used by the cinema to communicate with its historical audience. The course explores both the historical place of the cinema within the development of twentieth-century urban culture in Paris as well as how this historical definition informs the development of the cinema.

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This module is designed to examine the overlapping influence of Early Modern and Enlightenment thinkers and writers mainly based in England, France and Germany. A particular focus is provided by the Parisian setting: several key figures (such as Voltaire, Rousseau and Diderot) lived in Paris for a significant part of their lives, and Paris was a city second to none in its importance within a vast international exchange of ideas during the Enlightenment period. The module will encourage students to consider the historical contexts out of which the various texts emerge, and show how ideas passed between England, France, Germany and elsewhere. Attention will consistently be paid to the tension between Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in Europe. This will include allowing the students to understand debates, in the eighteenth century (and, if appropriate, since then), around the following issues: empiricism; sensationism; toleration; freedom of speech; aesthetics; literary genres; the 'pre-Romantic'.

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The curriculum includes a selection of texts from various countries, all readily available in English and all specifically relevant to the modern history, evolving population and changing appearance of Paris and to how these aspects of the city has been perceived and represented in literary prose. The set texts are by writers from different periods and of various nationalities and they are all set in and inspired by Paris. The texts are chosen for their high literary quality, but also because they represent essential aspects of the city’s evolution and exemplify various narrative strategies and ways of engaging with the realities of life in the city, always shaped by personal preoccupations and sensibilities. This varied selection within the genre of prose fiction allows study of Zola’s naturalism and his presentation of the political and aesthetic implications of baron Haussman’s plans for urban renewal and control; Edith Wharton’s perspective as an American incomer; André Breton’s combination of oneiric urban encounters with photographic illustrations of the city, inserted into the text; Jean Rhys’s clearly gendered experience of the city in the 1920s and 1930s; the identity of the city as a site for postwar liberation and literary dynamism in the work of expatriates from the Beat generation; and the representation of today’s city as a centre for immigrant communities and cultural diversity. The primary texts are thus all Paris-focussed but are chosen to open an international perspective on the literary representation of an increasingly cosmopolitan city.

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The dissertation module gives students the opportunity to write a dissertation of around 12,000-15,000 words on a topic of their choosing relating to history of art or philosophy of art and aesthetics. The process of developing a topic and writing the dissertation is closely supported through classes during term 3, and individual meetings with the student's dissertation supervisor. Supervision is usually by staff with direct research expertise in the student’s chosen topic.

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Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

  • provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art
  • provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research
  • enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art
  • enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate
  • enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art
  • enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • aspects of the historical development of art, movements, styles and genres, especially from the Renaissance to the present day
  • the works of a range of significant artists of different periods and cultures
  • a range of different visual art forms and techniques, such as painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, installation and video
  • the cultural, social and historical contexts in which artworks are produced, used and understood
  • art historical methods and theories used to study art
  • substantive areas of current research in art history
  • the impact of philosophies of art and aesthetics on the visual arts
  • aspects of the history of aesthetics and the philosophy of art in the western tradition
  • aspects of contemporary aesthetic theory and issues in the philosophy of art
  • various positions taken on key issues in contemporary aesthetics and philosophy of art
  • the range of philosophical issues arising in relation to a particular medium of fine art
  • primary and secondary philosophical writings on art and aesthetics relevant to contemporary philosophy of art.

Intellectual skills

You develop the following intellectual skills:

  • a high degree of independent thinking, particularly in relation to the ideas, issues and debates within art history and the philosophy of art
  • advanced research skills relevant to the preparation of essays, dissertations and seminar assignments.
  • an advanced ability to evaluate a range of both primary and secondary sources and conceptual frameworks appropriate to research in the history and philosophy of art
  • a highly developed ability to synthesise diverse materials and ideas to further a specific art historical or art philosophical position
  • an ability to analyse and interpret texts and arguments in a manner that demonstrates advanced skills of critical evaluation
  • an ability to critically reflect at an advanced level upon both one’s own ideas and positions.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in:

  • advanced skills of observation, analysis and interpretation of visual artworks, drawing on your knowledge of visual traditions and conventions
  • the use of concepts and methods specific to the history and theory of art
  • the capacity to locate and evaluate evidence from relevant visual and textual sources, and interpret it in relation to art historical enquiries
  • the ability to construct highly effective arguments to defend or challenge a position held by yourself or others
  • the ability to critically engage at an advanced level with some major thinkers and intellectual traditions within art history and the philosophy of art
  • advanced skills of constructive debate and defence of ideas
  • a high degree of critical reflectiveness upon assumptions and beliefs
  • advanced skills of oral presentation and defence of ideas and positions.

Transferable skills

You will gain the following transferable skills:

  • the ability, at an advanced level, to organise information clearly, respond to written sources, present information orally, use images as a communication tool, present arguments cogently and effectively in written or spoken form
  • the ability, at an advanced level, to identify and access relevant materials and synthesise them into a broader piece of work
  • the ability to produce written documents, undertake online research, communicate using email and process information using databases
  • the ability to listen effectively and so to learn from and participate constructively in discussion
  • the ability to organise and manage supervised, self-directed work
  • the ability to work in flexible and independently minded ways, showing self-discipline and self-direction
  • problem-solving: the ability to identify and define problems, explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them
  • focus and attentiveness to detail: the ability to work diligently, to fulfil briefs and deadlines, and to take responsibility for your own work.
  • the ability to gather, organise and deploy ideas in order to formulate arguments cogently and express them effectively orally and in written form.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Study support

Postgraduate resources

In Paris you are encouraged to make full use of the city’s cultural resources and to integrate that experience into your studies. The Louvre, Centre Pompidou, Musée d’Orsay, Musée d’Arte Moderne, Grand Palais and other world-class museums and exhibition spaces are on your doorstep. You have access to screenings of modern and classic films and to the research facilities at the National Cinémathèque and Museum of Cinema and at the Forum des Images. You also have access to the libraries of University of Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle) and University of Paris VII. Other Paris libraries with extensive relevant holdings include the French National Library, the Centre Georges Pompidou Public Library and the American Library in Paris, to which you are given access and a guided visit.

Support

All postgraduate students are offered research skills training and the opportunity to take part in reading groups and research seminars. 

In recent years, several members of the History of Art Department, both full-time and part-time, have been awarded University prizes for excellence in student support, curriculum innovation and research-based teaching – an ethos which we seek to extend to the postgraduate community.

Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: British Journal of Aesthetics; Art History; History of Photography; Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism; Journal of Visual Arts Practice; and The Philosophical Quarterly.

Global Skills Award

All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme. The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.  

Entry requirements

An upper second-class honours degree or better, usually in a relevant humanities subject. In certain circumstances, the School will consider candidates who have not followed a conventional education path or who may have relevant experience in the industry. These cases are assessed individually by the Director of Graduate Studies.

Your application should include a sample of your academic writing. Ideally this will be an essay, on a similar or related topic, that you have recently written as part of your undergraduate degree programme. Please upload this to your application portal.

All applicants are considered on an individual basis and additional qualifications, and professional qualifications and experience will also be taken into account when considering applications. 

International students

Please see our International Student website for entry requirements by country and other relevant information for your country. 

English language entry requirements

The University requires all non-native speakers of English to reach a minimum standard of proficiency in written and spoken English before beginning a postgraduate degree. Certain subjects require a higher level.

For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. 

Need help with English?

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Aesthetics Research Centre

The Aesthetics Research Centre coordinates, enables and promotes research in philosophy of art and aesthetics at the University of Kent.

Art History and Visual Cultures

This Research Centre promotes and co-ordinates research amongst the growing community of staff and PG students active at Kent in the field of Art History. 

Other Research Centres within the School:

Centre for Film and Media Research

The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

European Theatre

Based at Kent, the UK’s European university, the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN) facilitates and fosters the exchange of theatre traditions, contemporary practices and academic discussion on theatre work from the European continent and also in the new European states. The MA Theatre Direction forms part of this expanding network, drawing for instance on our connection to the Schaubühne Berlin, the Grotowski Workcentre, and other European theatre institutions. For further information, please see www.europeantheatre.org.uk

Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance

The Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance brings together Drama staff and staff in Engineering and Digital Arts; Psychology; Anthropology; and the Tizard Centre to explore the possibilities of interdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration between researchers and practitioners in the fields of cognitive neuroscience, interactive performance, digital media, disability studies, and applied performance. For further information, please see www.kent.ac.uk/ckp

Popular and Comic Performance

The Popular and Comic Performance (PCP) research centre brings together academics from a range of disciplines (e.g. Drama, Film, Social Anthropology, Philosophy). Their research investigates a real variety of related areas including: stand-up comedy; music hall and variety; 18th century popular theatre; melodrama; Greek Old and Middle comedy; community performance work; puppetry; TV and film production; and punk performance. For further information, please see www.kent.ac.uk/arts/research/centres/popularcomicperformance

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website.

Dr Jonathan Friday: Senior Lecturer

Aesthetic theory and photographic studies; 18th-century British aesthetic theory; classical and contemporary photographic theory; photographic genre.

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Professor Martin Hammer: Professor

British art in the mid 20th-century (artists such as Naum Gabo, Francis Bacon, Graham Sutherland, Stanley Spencer); modern and contemporary international art; the modern portrait. 

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Professor Tom Henry: Professor

Specialist in Italian renaissance art, with a particular interest in Central Italian painters including Raphael, Piero della Francesca, Pietro Perugino and Luca Signorelli.

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Dr Hans Maes: Senior Lecturer

Philosophy of art and aesthetics including the role of intention in the interpretation of art; the relation between (erotic) art and pornography; the role of beauty in art and culture; the nature and value of aesthetic experience.

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Dr Michael Newall: Senior Lecturer; Director, MA Programme

Philosophy of painting; depiction; theories of the sublime; art school education; contemporary art.

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Dr Grant Pooke: Senior Lecturer; Head of Subject and Research

Contemporary British art; Marxist art historiography, the Cold War and aesthetics; developing teaching approaches to art history; art histories, boundaries and aspects of the postcolonial.

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Dr Ben Thomas: Senior Lecturer; Curator, Studio 3 Gallery

Renaissance art; Renaissance art theory; Renaissance and baroque prints; the history of collecting and museums; historiography of art, particularly the work of Edgar Wind and the Cold War.

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Fees

The 2018/19 annual tuition fees for this programme are:

History and Philosophy of Art - MA at Paris:
UK/EU Overseas
Full-time €9990 €18220
Part-time €5000 €9110

For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

General additional costs

Find out more about accommodation and living costs, plus general additional costs that you may pay when studying at Kent.

Funding

Search our scholarships finder for possible funding opportunities. You may find it helpful to look at both: