Students preparing for their graduation ceremony at Canterbury Cathedral

Mathematics - MSc, PhD

2019

Studying Mathematics at postgraduate level gives you a chance to begin your own research, develop your own creativity and be part of a long tradition of people investigating analytic, geometric and algebraic ideas.

2019

Overview

You would be joining a vibrant research community of almost 100 postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers and academic staff. You have the opportunity to engage with a very wide range of research topics within a well-established system of support and training, with a high level of contact between staff and research students.

A very active research seminar programme further enhances the Mathematics research experience.

About the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science (SMSAS)

The School has a strong reputation for world-class research as indicated by our results in the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF). Postgraduate students develop analytical, communication and research skills. Developing computational skills and applying them to mathematical problems forms a significant part of the postgraduate training in the School.

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 rated 72% of the School's research output as International Quality or above. The School is in the top 25 in the UK when considered on weighted GPA.

The Mathematics Group also has an excellent track record of winning research grants from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the Royal Society, the EU, the London Mathematical Society and the Leverhulme Trust.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science was ranked 25th in the UK for research power and 100% or our research was judged to be of international quality.

An impressive 92% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in Mathematics is a flexible and valuable qualification that gives you a competitive advantage in a wide range of mathematically oriented careers. Our programmes enable you to develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for including problem-solving, independent thought, report-writing, project management, leadership skills, teamworking and good communication.

Many of our graduates have gone on to work in international organisations, the financial sector, and business. Others have found postgraduate research places at Kent and other universities.

Study support

Postgraduate resources

The University’s Templeman Library houses a comprehensive collection of books and research periodicals. Online access to a wide variety of journals is available through services such as ScienceDirect and SpringerLink. The School has licences for major numerical and computer algebra software packages. Postgraduates are provided with computers in shared offices in the School. The School has two dedicated terminal rooms for taught postgraduate students to use for lectures and self-study.

Support

The School has a well-established system of support and training, with a high level of contact between staff and research students. There are two weekly seminar series: The Mathematics Colloquium at Kent attracts international speakers discussing recent advances in their subject; the Friday seminar series features in-house speakers and visitors talking about their latest work. These are supplemented by weekly discussion groups. The School is a member of the EPSRC-funded London Taught Course Centre for PhD students in the mathematical sciences, and students can participate in the courses and workshops offered by the Centre. The School offers conference grants to enable research students to present their work at national and international conferences.

Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Advances in Mathematics; Algebra and Representation Theory; Journal of Physics A; Journal of Symbolic Computations; Journal of Topology and Analysis. Details of recently published books can be found within the staff research interests section.

Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subject-specific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Entry requirements

A first or second class honours degree in a subject with a significant mathematical content (or equivalent).

All applicants are considered on an individual basis and additional qualifications, and professional qualifications and experience will also be taken into account when considering applications. 

International students

Please see our International Student website for entry requirements by country and other relevant information for your country. 

English language entry requirements

The University requires all non-native speakers of English to reach a minimum standard of proficiency in written and spoken English before beginning a postgraduate degree. Certain subjects require a higher level.

For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. 

Need help with English?

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

Research areas

The research interests of the Mathematics Group cover a wide range of topics following our strategy of cohesion with diversity. The areas outlined provide focal points for these varied interests.

Nonlinear differential equations

The research on nonlinear differential equations primarily studies algorithms for their classification, normal forms, symmetry reductions and exact solutions. Boundary value problems are studied from an analytical viewpoint, using functional analysis and spectral theory to investigate properties of solutions. We also study applications of symmetry methods to numerical schemes, in particular the applications of moving frames.

Painlevé equations

Current research on the Painlevé equations involves the structure of hierarchies of rational, algebraic and special function families of exact solutions, Bäcklund transformations and connection formulae using the isomonodromic deformation method. The group is also studying analogous results for the discrete Painlevé equations, which are nonlinear difference equations.

Mathematical biology

Artificial immune systems use nonlinear interactions between cell populations in the immune system as the inspiration for new computer algorithms. We are using techniques of nonlinear dynamical systems to analyse the properties of these systems.

Quantum integrable systems

Current research on quantum integrable systems focuses on powerful exact analytical and numerical techniques, with applications in particle physics, quantum information theory and mathematical physics.

Topological solitons

Topological solitons are stable, finite energy, particle-like solutions of nonlinear wave equations that arise due to the general topological properties of the nonlinear system concerned. Examples include monopoles, skyrmions and vortices. This research focuses on classical and quantum behaviour of solitons with applications in various areas of physics including particle, nuclear and condensed matter physics. The group employs a wide range of different techniques including numerical simulations, exact analytic solutions and geometrical methods.

Algebra and representation theory

A representation of a group is the concrete realisation of the group as a group of transformations. Representation theory played an important role in the proof of the classification of finite simple groups, one of the outstanding achievements of 20th-century algebra. Representations of both groups and algebras are important in diverse areas of mathematics, such as statistical mechanics, knot theory and combinatorics.

Algebraic topology

In topology, geometry is studied with algebraic tools. An example of an algebraic object assigned to a geometric phenomenon is the winding number: this is an integer assigned to a map of the n-dimensional sphere to itself. The methods used in algebraic topology link in with homotopy theory, homological algebra and modern category theory.

Invariant theory

Invariant theory has its roots in the classical constructive algebra of the 19th century and motivated the development of modern algebra by Hilbert, Noether, Weyl and others. There are natural applications and interactions with algebraic geometry, algebraic topology and representation theory. The starting point is an action of a group on a commutative ring, often a ring of polynomials on several variables. The ring of invariants, the subring of fixed points, is the primary object of study. We use computational methods to construct generators for the ring of invariants, and theoretical methods to understand the relationship between the structure of the ring of invariants and the underlying representation.

Financial mathematics

Research includes work on financial risk management, asset pricing and optimal asset allocation, along with models to improve corporate financial management.

Staff research interests

Kent’s world-class academics provide research students with excellent supervision. The academic staff in this school and their research interests are shown below. You are strongly encouraged to contact the school to discuss your proposed research and potential supervision prior to making an application. Please note, it is possible for students to be supervised by a member of academic staff from any of Kent’s schools, providing their expertise matches your research interests. Use our ‘find a supervisor’ search to search by staff member or keyword.

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website.

Dr Antonis Alexandridis: Lecturer in Finance

Weather derivatives and weather risk management; derivatives modelling; pricing and forecasting; artificial intelligence and financial engineering; neural and wavelet networks; quantitative finance.

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Professor Peter A Clarkson: Professor of Mathematics

Soliton theory, in particular the Painlevé equations, and Painlevé analysis. Asymptotics, Bäcklund transformations, connection formulae and exact solutions for nonlinear ordinary differential and difference equations, in particular the Painlevé equations and discrete Painlevé equations. Orthogonal polynomials and special functions, in particular nonlinear special functions such as the Painlevé equations. Symmetry reductions and exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations, in particular using nonclassical and generalized techniques.

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Dr Clare Dunning: Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics

Exactly solvable models in mathematical physics; integrable quantum field theory and spectral theory of ordinary differential equations.

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Professor Peter Fleischmann: Professor of Pure Mathematics

Representation theory and structure theory of finite groups; constructive invariant theory; applied algebra and discrete mathematics.

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Dr Steffen Krusch: Lecturer in Applied Mathematics

Topological solitons in mathematical physics, in particular the classical and quantum behaviour of Skyrmions.

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Dr Stephane Launois: Reader in Pure Mathematics

Non-commutative algebra and non-commutative geometry, in particular, quantum algebras and links with their (semi-)classical counterparts: enveloping algebras and Poisson algebras.

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Dr Bas Lemmens: Senior Lecturer in Mathematics

Nonlinear (functional) analysis, dynamical systems theory and metric geometry. In particular, the theory of monotone dynamical systems and its applications, and the geometry of Hilbert's metric spaces.

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Dr Ana F. Loureiro: Lecturer in Mathematics

Orthogonal polynomials; special functions and integral transforms; some aspects of combinatorics and approximation theory.

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Professor Elizabeth L Mansfield: Professor of Mathematics

Nonlinear differential and difference equations; variational methods; moving frames and geometric integration.

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Dr Jaideep S Oberoi: Lecturer in Finance

Identification and quantification of liquidity risk in financial markets and the implications of incomplete information for asset price co-variation.

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Dr Rowena E Paget: Lecturer in Pure Mathematics

Representation theory of groups and algebras, with emphasis on algebras possessing a quasihereditary or cellular structure, such as the group algebras of symmetric groups, Brauer algebras and other diagram algebras.

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Dr Constanze Roitzheim: Lecturer in Mathematics

Stable homotopy theory, in particular model categories and chromatic homotopy theory; homological algebra; A-infinity algebras.

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Dr R James Shank: Reader in Mathematics

The invariant theory of finite groups and related aspects of commutative algebra, algebraic topology and representation theory.

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Dr Huamao Wang: Lecturer in Finance

Developing mathematical models; numerical methods and practical application of portfolio optimisation; derivative pricing and hedging; risk management based on stochastic calculus, optimal control, filtering and simulation.

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Dr Jing Ping Wang: Reader in Applied Mathematics

Geometric and algebraic properties of nonlinear partial differential equations; test and classification of integral systems and asymptotic normal forms of partial differential equations.

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Dr Ian Wood: Lecturer in Mathematics

Analysis of PDEs and spectral theory, in particular, the study of spectral properties of non-self adjoint operators via boundary triples and M-functions (generalised Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps), regularity to solutions of PDEs in Lipschitz domains and waveguides in periodic structures.

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Dr Chris F Woodcock: Senior Lecturer in Pure Mathematics

P-adic analogues of classical functions; commutative algebra; algebraic geometry; modular invariant theory.

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Fees

The 2019/20 annual tuition fees for Home/EU PG Research programmes have not yet been set by the Research Councils UK.  This is ordinarily announced in March. 

General additional costs

Find out more about general additional costs that you may pay when studying at Kent. 

Funding

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