Media, Identity and Diversity - MSTU4002

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Module delivery information

Location Term Level1 Credits (ECTS)2 Current Convenor3 2021 to 2022
Canterbury
Spring Term 4 30 (15) Rosie Findlay checkmark-circle

Overview

This introductory module examines the concept of 'identity' and 'diversity' through the prism of cultural capital and media presentation. Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories surrounding issues of gender, class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, political identity, sports identity, and diversity. These topics are considered through a series of case studies that may include theories of media stereotypes, high and low culture, consumption society, identity politics, cultural production, subculture and style, and media pluralism. Students will be asked to consider the role that media processes play in constructing identity, diversity, and community, inclusion and exclusion.

Details

Contact hours

Total contact hours: 33
Private study hours: 267
Total study hours: 300

Method of assessment

Main assessment methods:

Critical Essay (2,000 words) (40%)
Digital Portfolio (60%)

Reassessment methods:
Reassessment Instrument: like for like

Indicative reading

Indicative Reading List:

Kellner, D. (1995). Media Culture, cultural studies, identity and politics between the modern and the postmodern. London, New York: Routledge.
Jenkins, R. (2008). Social Identity, London: Routledge.
Gill, Rosalind. (2006), Gender and the Media. London: Polity
Gelder, Ken. (2005). Subcultures Reader. London: Routledge
Giddens, A. (1991). Modernity and self-identity: self and society in the late modern age. Cambridge: Polity.
Featherstone, M. (1991) Consumer culture and postmodernism. London: Sage.

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes.
On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1 Demonstrate basic knowledge about the relationship between culture, identity and diversity, how this relationship is contingent on historical context, and transformed in the current world;
2 Demonstrate basic knowledge about key concepts and theories surrounding issues of gender, class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, consumer, political identity and diversity.
3 Demonstrate basic knowledge about theories of high and low culture, sub-cultural theories, media representations and stereotype, sub-cultures, consumer choice, identity politics and cultural production.
4 Demonstrate basic understanding of role that media processes play in constructing identity, diversity, community, inclusion and exclusion

The intended generic learning outcomes.
On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1. Engage in meaningful debate about issues and practices within their degree area;
2 Demonstrate understanding of key concepts within relevant academic literature;
3 Demonstrate research skills, including the ability to assess the merits of, and make critical judgments in relation to, academic and non-academic sources of information;
4 Demonstrate written communication skills;
5 Demonstrate an ability to prepare and deliver cohesive and convincing arguments in writing and in verbal presentation;
6 Act on feedback received from both academic staff and peers.

Notes

  1. Credit level 4. Certificate level module usually taken in the first stage of an undergraduate degree.
  2. ECTS credits are recognised throughout the EU and allow you to transfer credit easily from one university to another.
  3. The named convenor is the convenor for the current academic session.
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