International Economic Law - LW632

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2018-19
Canterbury
(version 2)
Spring
View Timetable
6 15 (7.5) PROF A Perry-Kessaris

Pre-requisites

None

Restrictions

Not available to non Law students.

2018-19

Overview

This module introduces the origins, evolution and impact of international economic law—that is, the regulation by (primarily) states and international organisations of international economic activity, such as the movement of goods, services, capital and people.
It takes a critical sociolegal approach to the field in the sense that it considers economic, social, political and cultural dimensions; and emphasises the existence of multiples perspectives, in particular of individuals and organisations; in the public, private, and third sectors; in relatively poor and relatively rich economic contexts; in times of calm and of crisis; and on local, national, regional and global levels.

Details

This module appears in:


Contact hours

10 hours of lectures and 10 hours of seminars.

Method of assessment

100% coursework consisting on one essay of 4000 words.

Indicative reading

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this module will be able to:
1. demonstrate critical knowledge and understanding of the origins, evolution and impact of international economic law and legal institutions; including economic, social, political and cultural dimensions.
2. demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the principles of international economic law by reference to appropriate primary and secondary sources.
3. critically analyse the legal structure and implications of specific international economic legal instruments such as investment agreements.
4. assess international economic law from multiple perspectives; in particular of individuals and organisations; in the public, private, and third sectors; in relatively poor and relatively rich economic contexts; in times of calm and of crisis; and on local, national, regional and global levels.

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