International Economic Law - LW632

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Module delivery information

Location Term Level1 Credits (ECTS)2 Current Convenor3 2021 to 2022
Canterbury
(version 2)
Spring 6 15 (7.5) PROF A Perry-Kessaris checkmark-circle

Overview

This module introduces the origins, evolution and impact of international economic law—that is, the regulation by (primarily) states and international organisations of international economic activity, such as the movement of goods, services, capital and people.

It takes a critical socio-legal approach to the field in the sense that it considers economic, social, political and cultural dimensions; and emphasises the existence of multiples perspectives, in particular of individuals and organisations; in the public, private, and third sectors; in relatively poor and relatively rich economic contexts; in times of calm and of crisis; and on local, national, regional and global levels.

Details

Contact hours

Total Contact Hours: 20
Private Study Hours: 130

Total Study Hours: 150

Method of assessment

Main assessment methods

The method of assessment will be by 100% coursework:

Essay, 4000 words (100%)

Reassessment methods

The module will be reassessed by a reassessment instrument of an essay for 100%.

Indicative reading

Books
Matthias Herdegen, Principles of International Economic Law, OUP 2013,
Andreas F. Lowenfeld, International Economic Law Second Edition: International Economic Law Series (2008).
Amanda Perry-Kessaris ed. Sociolegal Approaches to International Economic Law Routledge 2013
Dani Rodrik, The Globalization Paradox (OUP 2011).
Ignaz Seidl-Hohenveldern, International Economic Law Kluwer, Hart, 2008.

Journals
Journal of International Economic Law

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes.
On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1. demonstrate critical knowledge and understanding of the origins, evolution and impact of international economic law and legal institutions; including economic, social, political and cultural dimensions.
2. demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the principles of international economic law by reference to appropriate primary and secondary sources.
3. critically analyse the legal structure and implications of specific international economic legal instruments such as investment agreements.
4. assess international economic law from multiple perspectives; in particular of individuals and organisations; in the public, private, and third sectors; in relatively poor and relatively rich economic contexts; in times of calm and of crisis; and on local, national, regional and global levels.


The intended generic learning outcomes.
On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1. apply the critical socio-legal methods and techniques that they have learned to review, consolidate, extend and apply their knowledge and understanding, and to initiate and carry out projects;
2. critically evaluate arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts and data (that may be incomplete), to make judgements, and to frame appropriate questions to achieve a solution - or identify a range of solutions - to a problem;
3. communicate information, ideas, problems, and solutions to both specialist and non-specialist audiences;

Notes

  1. Credit level 6. Higher level module usually taken in Stage 3 of an undergraduate degree.
  2. ECTS credits are recognised throughout the EU and allow you to transfer credit easily from one university to another.
  3. The named convenor is the convenor for the current academic session.
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