Analytical Chemistry - CH604

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2017-18 2018-19
Canterbury Autumn and Spring
View Timetable
6 15 (7.5) DR SCG Biagini

Pre-requisites

CH506

Restrictions

None

2017-18

Overview

Here, you will be introduced to a variety of modern techniques used to understand the structure, properties and potential applications of materials. Analytical techniques include: atomic emission/absorption spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), ion chromatography, mass spectrometry and gas chromatography (GCMS), electro-analytical chemistry, optical microscopy, electron microscopy.

Details

This module appears in:


Contact hours

30 hours of lectures, as well as coursework assessment guidance and revision classes on request.

Total hours: 150, including private study.

Availability

This is not available as a wild module.

Method of assessment

Examination: 75%; Coursework: 25%.

Preliminary reading

G. D. Christian, Analytical Chemistry, 6th Ed. New York; Chichester, Wiley, 2003.

  • D. A. Skoog, D. M. West, F. J. Holler and S. R. Crouch, Analytical Chemistry — An Introduction, 8th Ed. Fort Worth: Saunders College Publishing; 2004.

  • K. A. Rubinson and J. F. Rubinson, Contemporary Instrumental Analysis, 1st Ed. Upper Saddle River (New Jersey): Prentice-Hall, 2000.

  • E. de Hoffman, J. J. Charette and V. Stroobant, Mass Spectrometry — Principles and Applications, 2nd edition, Chichester, Wiley, 2001.

    See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

    See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

  • Learning outcomes

    Core and foundation scientific physical, biological and chemical concepts, terminology, theory, units, conventions, and laboratory methods in relation to the chemical and forensic sciences.

  • Areas of chemistry including analytical chemistry, including as applied to forensic analysis.
  • Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of essential facts, concepts, principles and theories relating to analytical chemistry and to apply such knowledge and understanding to the solution of qualitative and quantitative problems.
  • Ability to recognise and analyse problems involving analytical chemistry and plan strategies for their solution by the evaluation, interpretation and synthesis of scientific information and data by a variety of computational methods.
  • The ability to collate, interpret and explain the significance and underlying theory of experimental data, including an assessment of limits of accuracy.
  • Ability to interpret data derived from laboratory observations and measurements in terms of their underlying significance and the theory underpinning them.
  • Evidence recovery, preservation, analysis, and presentation to professional standards
  • Generic skills needed for students to undertake further training of a professional nature.
  • Problem-solving skills, relating to qualitative and quantitative information, extending to situations where evaluations have to be made on the basis of limited information.
  • Numeracy and computational skills, including such aspects as error analysis, order-of-magnitude estimations, correct use of units and modes of data presentation.
  • Time-management and organisational skills, as evidenced by the ability to plan and implement efficient and effective modes of working. Self-management and organisational skills with the capacity to support life-long learning.
  • Study skills needed for continuing professional development and professional employment.

  • University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that module information is accurate for the relevant academic session and to provide educational services as described. However, courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Please read our full disclaimer.