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Undergraduate Courses 2017

Actuarial Science with a Year in Industry - BSc (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

Actuaries evaluate and manage financial risks, particularly in the financial services industry. They form a small yet well-respected, influential and relatively well-paid profession. If you are good at mathematics and you are curious about financial matters, you should enjoy studying actuarial science.

Our degree gives you the opportunity to gain exemptions from eight of the professional examinations set by the UK actuarial profession, and is one of the few programmes to achieve full accreditation from the profession. Once you qualify, employment prospects are good, and students from this course have also gone on to successful careers in other areas such as accountancy, banking or operational research. The core actuarial modules are taught by professionally qualified actuaries with many years’ industry experience.

This course offers a year in industry and we run the Invicta Actuarial Society, which provides good links with industry. Our School is friendly and we make a point of getting to know our students on a one-to-one basis.

Think Kent video series

How long are you likely to live? Being able to model human longevity accurately is essential for pension schemes and life insurance companies. In this entertaining lecture, Professor Paul Sweeting, Professor of Actuarial Science at the University of Kent, explores the key issues, and how research is helping to address them.

Independent rankings

In the National Student Survey 2015, 93% of students from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science were satisfied with the overall quality of their course.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

MA306 - Statistics (15 credits)

This module will introduce the student to the basic concepts of statistics. The material will be related to real data at every stage and MINITAB will be used to provide statistical computing facilities for all the material studied. Data description and data summary will be studied, followed by an introduction to the main methods of inference. Most material will be based on the Normal, t, and F distributions, but some simple non-parametric procedures will also be covered. The following is a brief summary of the topics to be covered in the module: graphical representation of data; numerical summaries of data; sampling distributions; point estimation; interval estimation; hypothesis tests; association between variables; introduction to nonparametric procedures.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA309 - Business Economics (15 credits)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the core economic principles and how these could be used in a business environment to help decision making and behaviour. The coverage is aimed at being sufficient to enable students to gain exemptions from the Actuarial professional examinations, whilst also giving a coherent coverage of the material suitable for other degree programmes, where understanding economic concepts and principles is beneficial. The syllabus includes: the working of competitive markets, consumer demand and behaviour, product selection, marketing and advertising strategies, costs of production, production function, revenue and profit, profit maximisation under perfect competition and monopoly, imperfect competition, business strategy, the objectives of strategic management, firms' growth strategy, pricing strategies, government intervention, international trade, balance of payment and exchange rates, the role of money and interest rates in the economy, the level of business activity, unemployment, inflation and macroeconomic policy.



Marks on this module can count towards exemption from the professional examination CT7 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA315 - Financial Mathematics (30 credits)

The aim of this module is to provide a grounding in financial mathematics and its simple applications. The idea of interest, which may be regarded as a price for the use of money, is fundamental to all long-term financial contracts. The module deals with accumulation of past payments and the discounting of future payments at fixed and varying rates of interest; it is fundamental to the financial aspects of Actuarial Science. The syllabus will cover: Generalised cashflow models, the time value of money, real and money interest rates, discounting and accumulating, compound interest functions, equations of value, loan schedules, project appraisal, investments, elementary compound interest problems, arbitrage free pricing and the pricing and valuation of forward contracts, the term structure of interest rates, stochastic interest rate models.



This is a dynamic syllabus, changing regularly to reflect current practice. (See www.actuaries.org.uk.)



Marks on this module can count towards exemption from the professional examination CT1 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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MA347 - Linear Mathematics (15 credits)

This module serves as an introduction to algebraic methods and linear algebra methods. These are central in modern mathematics, having found applications in many other sciences and also in our everyday life.



Topics covered will include:

Basic set theory: introduction to sets, operations on sets (union, intersection, Cartesian product, complement), basic counting (inclusion-exclusion for 2 sets).

Functions and Relations: injective, surjective, bijective functions. Permutations, sign of a permutation. The Pigeonhole Principle. Cardinality of sets. Binomial coefficients, Binomial Theorem. Equivalence relations and partitions.

Systems of linear equations and Gaussian elimination: operations on systems of equations, echelon form, rank, consistency, homogeneous and non-homogeneous systems.

Matrices: operations, invertible matrices, trace, transpose.

Determinants: definition, properties and criterion for a matrix to be invertible.

Vector spaces: linearly independent and spanning sets, bases, dimension, subspaces.

Linear Transformations: Definition. Matrix of a Linear Transformation. Change of Basis.

Diagonalisation: Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, invariant spaces, sufficient conditions.

Bilinear forms: inner products, norms, Cauchy-Schwarz inequality.

Orthonormal systems: the Gram-Schmidt process.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA348 - Mathematical Methods 1 (15 credits)

This module introduces widely-used mathematical methods for functions of a single variable. The emphasis is on the practical use of these methods; key theorems are stated but not proved at this stage. Tutorials and Maple worksheets will be used to support taught material.

Complex numbers: Complex arithmetic, the complex conjugate, the Argand diagram, de Moivre's Theorem, modulus-argument form; elementary functions

Polynomials: Fundamental Theorem of Algebra (statement only), roots, factorization, rational functions, partial fractions

Single variable calculus: Differentiation, including product and chain rules; Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (statement only), elementary integrals, change of variables, integration by parts, differentiation of integrals with variable limits

Scalar ordinary differential equations (ODEs): definition; methods for first-order ODEs; principle of superposition for linear ODEs; particular integrals; second-order linear ODEs with constant coefficients; initial-value problems

Curve sketching: graphs of elementary functions, maxima, minima and points of inflection, asymptotes

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA349 - Mathematical Methods 2 (15 credits)

This module introduces widely-used mathematical methods for vectors and functions of two or more variables. The emphasis is on the practical use of these methods; key theorems are stated but not proved at this stage. Tutorials and Maple worksheets will be used to support taught material.

Vectors: Cartesian coordinates; vector algebra; scalar, vector and triple products (and geometric interpretation); straight lines and planes expressed as vector equations; parametrized curves; differentiation of vector-valued functions of a scalar variable; tangent vectors; vector fields (with everyday examples)

Partial differentiation: Functions of two variables; partial differentiation (including the chain rule and change of variables); maxima, minima and saddle points; Lagrange multipliers

Integration in two dimensions: Double integrals in Cartesian coordinates; plane polar coordinates; change of variables for double integrals; line integrals; Green's theorem (statement – justification on rectangular domains only)

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA351 - Probability (15 credits)

Introduction to Probability. Concepts of events and sample space. Set theoretic description of probability, axioms of probability, interpretations of probability (objective and subjective probability).

Theory for unstructured sample spaces. Addition law for mutually exclusive events. Conditional probability. Independence. Law of total probability. Bayes' theorem. Permutations and combinations. Inclusion-Exclusion formula.

Discrete random variables. Concept of random variable (r.v.) and their distribution. Discrete r.v.: Probability function (p.f.). (Cumulative) distribution function (c.d.f.). Mean and variance of a discrete r.v. Examples: Binomial, Poisson, Geometric.

Continuous random variables. Probability density function; mean and variance; exponential, uniform and normal distributions; normal approximations: standardisation of the normal and use of tables. Transformation of a single r.v.

Joint distributions. Discrete r.v.'s; independent random variables; expectation and its application.

Generating functions. Idea of generating functions. Probability generating functions (pgfs) and moment generating functions (mgfs). Finding moments from pgfs and mgfs. Sums of independent random variables.

Laws of Large Numbers. Weak law of large numbers. Central Limit Theorem.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

MA501 - Statistics for Insurance (15 credits)

This module covers aspects of Statistics which are particularly relevant to insurance. Some topics (such as risk theory and credibility theory) have been developed specifically for actuarial use. Other areas (such as Bayesian Statistics) have been developed in other contexts but now find applications in actuarial fields. Stochastic processes of events such as accidents, together with the financial flow of their payouts underpin much of the work. Since the earliest games of chance, the probability of ruin has been a topic of interest. Outline Syllabus includes: Decision Theory; Bayesian Statistics; Loss Distributions; Reinsurance; Credibility Theory; Empirical Bayes Credibility theory; Risk Models; Ruin Theory; Generalised Linear Models; Run-off Triangles.



Marks on this module can count towards exemption from the professional examination CT6 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA516 - Contingencies 1 (15 credits)

This module introduces the concept of survival models, which model future survival time as a random variable. The concept is combined with the financial mathematics learned in module MA315, making it possible to analyse simple contracts which depend on survival time, such as life insurance and annuities. The syllabus will cover: introduction to survival models including actuarial notation, allowance for temporary initial selection and an overview of the typical pattern of human mortality; formulae for the means and variances of the present values of payments under life insurance and annuity contracts assuming constant deterministic interest; practical methods for evaluating the formulae; description and calculation of net premiums, net premium provisions and mortality profit or loss under simple life insurance and annuity contracts; and extension of the basic concepts to straightforward contracts involving two lives.



Marks on this module can count towards examption from the professional examination CT5 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA527 - Corporate Finance for Actuaries (15 credits)

This module introduces and explores a range of topics relating to corporate finance which are fundamental to understanding why and how companies raise money to start a business or expand an existing one. The module covers the different ways that the money can be raised, for example from a bank or through a stocks and shares market, and the interest rate or investment return that an investor will expect to receive from a company in order to provide the money required. This is a very practical module to the extent that it will help students develop business awareness in the field of company finance. Reference will often be made to actual happenings in the financial markets in support of the material covered.



Marks on this module can count towards examption from the professional examination CT2 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA528 - Financial Reports and their Analysis (15 credits)

This module considers the construction and analysis of corporate accounts including the following: Regulatory backdrop to accounting, Accounting Principles, Basic construction of the main accounts, ie statements of comprehensive income, statements of financial position, cashflow statements and changes in equity statements, Directors and auditors reports, Interpretation of accounts and horizontal and vertical analysis using ratios, Limitations of accounts and ratio analysis, Group accounting structures, Peculiarities of insurance company accounts.



Marks on this module can count towards examption from the professional examination CT2 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA529 - Probability and Statistics for Actuarial Science 2 (15 credits)

This module is a pre-requisite for many of the other statistics modules at Stages 2, 3 and 4, but it can equally well be studied as a module in its own right, extending the ideas of probability and statistics met at Stage 1 and providing practice with the mathematical skills learned in MA321. Marks on this module can count towards exemption from the professional examination CT3 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. It starts by revising the idea of a probability distribution for one or more random variables, and then looks at different methods to derive the distribution of a function of random variables. These techniques are then used to prove some of the results underpinning the hypothesis test and confidence interval calculations met at Stage 1, such as for the t-test or the F-test. With these tools to hand, the module moves on to look at how to fit models (probability distributions) to sets of data. A standard technique, known as the method of maximum likelihood, is introduced, which is then used to fit the model to the data to obtain point estimates of the model parameters and to construct hypothesis tests and confidence intervals for these parameters.  Linear regression and analysis of variance models are introduced, which aim to describe the relationship between a random variable of interest and one or more covariates,  for example the relationship between income and education level or gender. Outline Syllabus includes: Joint, marginal and conditional distributions of discrete and continuous random variables; Generating functions; Transformations of random variables; Poisson processes; Sampling distributions; Point and interval estimation; Properties of estimators; Maximum likelihood; Hypothesis testing; Neyman-Pearson lemma; Maximum likelihood ratio test; Simple linear regression: ANOVA.



Marks on this module can count towards exemption from the professional examination CT3 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA552 - Analysis (15 credits)

This module will consider many concepts you know from Calculus and put them on a more rigorous basis. The concept of a limit is basic to Calculus and, unless this concept is defined precisely, uncertainties and paradoxes will creep into the subject. Based on the foundation of the real number system, this module develops the theory of convergence of sequences and series and the study of continuity and differentiability of functions. The notion of Riemann integration is also explored. The syllabus includes the following: Sequences and their convergence. The convergence of bounded increasing sequences. Series and their convergence: the comparison test, the ratio test, absolute and conditional convergence, the alternating series test. Continuous functions: the boundedness theorem, the Intermediate Value Theorem. Differentiable functions: The Mean Value Theorem with applications, power series, Taylor expansions. Construction and properties of the Riemann integral.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA553 - Linear Algebra (15 credits)

Systems of linear equations appear in numerous applications of mathematics. Studying solution sets to such systems leads to the abstract notions of a vector space and a linear transformation. Matrices can be used to represent linear transformations and to do concrete calculations. This module is about the properties of vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices. The syllabus includes: vector spaces, linearly independent and spanning sets, bases, dimension, subspaces, linear transformations, the matrix of a linear transformation, similar matrices, the determinant, diagonalisation, bilinear forms, norms, and the Gram-Schmidt process.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA639 - Time Series Modelling and Simulation (15 credits)

A time series is a collection of observations made sequentially in time. Examples occur in a variety of fields, ranging from economics to engineering, and methods of analysing time series constitute an important area of statistics. This module focuses initially on various time series models, including some recent developments, and provides modern statistical tools for their analysis. The second part of the module covers extensively simulation methods. These methods are becoming increasingly important tools as simulation models can be easily designed and run on modern PCs. Various practical examples are considered to help students tackle the analysis of real data.The syllabus includes: Difference equations, Stationary Time Series: ARMA process. Nonstationary Processes: ARIMA Model Building and Testing: Estimation, Box Jenkins, Criteria for choosing between models, Diagnostic tests.Forecasting: Box-Jenkins, Prediction bounds. Testing for Trends and Unit Roots: Dickey-Fuller, ADF, Structural change, Trend-stationarity vs difference stationarity. Seasonality and Volatility: ARCH, GARCH, ML estimation. Multiequation Time Series Models: Spectral Analysis. Generation of pseudo – random numbers, simulation methods: inverse transform and acceptance-rejection, design issues and sensitivity analysis.



Marks on this module can count towards exemption from the professional examination CT6 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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Year in industry

Students on this course spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. We can offer help and advice in finding a placement. This greatly enhances your CV and gives you the opportunity to put your academic skills into practice. It also gives you an idea of your career options. Recent placements have included IBM, management consultancies, government departments, actuarial firms and banks.

Possible modules may include:


Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

MA636 - Stochastic Processes (15 credits)

A stochastic process is a process developing in time according to probability rules, for example, models for reserves in insurance companies, queue formation, the behaviour of a population of bacteria, and the persistence (or otherwise) of an unusual surname through successive generations.The syllabus will include coverage of a wide variety of stochastic processes and their applications: Markov chains; processes in continuous-time such as the Poisson process, the birth and death process and queues.



Marks on this module can count towards exemption from the professional examination CT4 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA533 - Contingencies 2 (15 credits)

Life Contingencies is concerned with the probabilities of life and death. Its practical application requires a considerable sophistication in mathematical techniques to ensure the soundness of many of the biggest financial institutions – life assurance companies and pension funds. This module introduces the actuarial mathematics which is needed for this. The aim of this module (together with MA516 – Contingencies 1) is to provide a grounding in the mathematical techniques which can be used to model and value cash flows dependent on death, survival, or other uncertain risks and cover the application of these techniques to calculate premium rates for annuities and assurances on one or more lives and the reserves that should be held for these contracts. Outline syllabus includes variable benefits and with profits contracts; gross premiums and reserves for fixed and variable benefit contracts; competing risks; pension funds; profit testing and reserves; mortality, selection and standardisation. This module together with module MA516 cover the entire syllabus of the UK Actuarial Profession's subject CT5 – Contingencies.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA535 - Portfolio Theory and Asset Pricing Models (15 credits)

An investor needs an assortment of tools in their toolkit to weigh up risk and return in alternative investment opportunities. This module introduces various measures of investment risk and optimal investment strategies using modern portfolio theory. Pricing of assets using the classical capital asset pricing model and arbitrage pricing theory are discussed. The theory of Brownian motion is used to analyse the behaviour of the lognormal model of asset prices, which is then compared with the auto-regressive Wilkie model of economic variables and asset prices. Principles of utility theory, behavioural finance and efficient market hypothesis provide the context from an investor's perspective. Outline syllabus includes: Measures of investment risk, Mean-Variance Portfolio Theory, Capital Asset Pricing Model, Arbitrage Pricing Theory, Brownian Motion, Lognormal Model, Wilkie Model, Utility Theory and Stochastic Dominance, Efficient Market Hypothesis and Behavioural Finance.



Marks on this module can count towards exemption from the professional examination CT8 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA537 - Mathematics of Financial Derivatives (15 credits)

This module introduces the main features of basic financial derivative contracts and develops pricing techniques. Principle of no-arbitrage, or absence of risk-free arbitrage opportunities, is applied to determine prices of derivative contracts, within the framework of binomial tree and geometric Brownian motion models. The interplay between pricing and hedging strategies, along with risk management principles, are emphasized to explain the mechanisms behind derivative instruments. Models of interest rate and credit risk are also discussed in this context. Outline syllabus includes: An introduction to derivatives, binomial tree model, Black-Scholes option pricing formula, Greeks and derivative risk management, interest rate models, credit risk models.



Marks on this module can count towards exemption from the professional examination CT8 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA539 - Financial Modelling (15 credits)

This module is split into two parts: 1. An introduction to the practical experience of working with the financial software package, PROPHET, which is used by commercial companies worldwide for profit testing, valuation and model office work. The syllabus includes: overview of the uses and applications of PROPHET, introduction on how to use the software, setting up and performing a profit test for a product , analysing and checking the cash flow results obtained for reasonableness, using the edit facility on input files, performing sensitivity tests , creating a new product using an empty workspace by selecting the appropriate indicators and variables for that product and setting up the various input files, debugging errors in the setting up of the new product, performing a profit test for the new product and analysing the results. 2. An introduction to financial modelling techniques on spreadsheets which will focus on documenting the process of model design and communicating the model's results. The module enables students to prepare, analyse and summarise data, develop simple financial and actuarial spreadsheet models to solve financial and actuarial problems, and apply, interpret and communicate the results of such models.



Co-requisite: MA533 Contingencies II

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA525 - Survival Models (15 credits)

Calculations in life assurance, pensions and health insurance require reliable estimates of transition intensities/survival rates. This module covers the estimation of these intensities and the graduation of these estimates so they can be used reliably by insurance companies and pension schemes. The syllabus includes the following: Principles of actuarial modelling. Distribution and density functions of the random future lifetime, the survival function and the force of hazard. Estimation procedures for lifetime distributions including censoring, Kaplan-Meier estimate, Nelson-Aalen estimate and Cox model. Statistical models of transfers between states. Maximum likelihood estimators for the transition intensities. Binomial and Poisson models of mortality. Estimation of age-dependent transition intensities. The graduation process. Testing of graduations. Measuring the exposed-to-risk.



Marks on this module can count towards examption from the professional examination CT4 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. Please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/casri/Accreditation/index.html for further details.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA509 - Actuarial Practice (30 credits)

This module covers the entry-level skills and knowledge required for those wishing to enter the actuarial (or related) profession. The module provides context for the actuarial techniques learned to date on the programme, as well as providing a platform for ongoing professional development. The first half of the module focuses on employability-related topics, such as creating a strong CV, and how to succeed in assessment centres. The second half explores the sectors that actuaries typically work in, explaining the concepts underpinning life insurance, general insurance, pensions, and risk management. Because of its practical nature, the syllabus is dynamic, changing regularly to reflect current practice and trends.



The textbooks listed are not required to be purchased, but may be consulted as further reading for students.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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Teaching & Assessment

Most of the teaching is by lectures and examples classes. At Stage 1, you can go to regular supervised classes where you can get help and advice on the way you approach problems. Modules which include programming or working with computer software packages usually involve practical sessions.

Each year, there are a number of special lectures by visiting actuaries from external organisations, to which all students are invited. These lectures help to bridge the gap between actuarial theory and its practical applications.

The course provides practical experience of working with PROPHET, a market-leading actuarial software package used by commercial companies worldwide for profit testing, valuation and model office work. This market-leading actuarial system is provided by SunGard, a global leader in integrated software and processing solutions primarily for financial services.

Programme aims

We aim to help students develop:

  • skills and knowledge appropriate to graduates in mathematical subjects
  • the ability to use rigorous reasoning and precise expression
  • the capabilities to formulate and solve problems
  • an appreciation of recent actuarial developments, and of the links between the theory and its practical application in industry
  • the ability to formulate a logical, mathematical approach to solving problems
  • an enhanced capacity for independent thought and work
  • competence in the use of IT and the relevant software
  • opportunities to study advanced topics, engage in research and develop communication and personal skills
  • eligibility for up to eight exemptions from examinations of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries.

In addition, the Year in Industry enables students to gain awareness of the application of technical concepts in the workplace.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • the principles of specific actuarial mathematics techniques including calculus, algebra, mathematical methods, discrete mathematics, analysis and linear algebra
  • probability and inference and time series modelling, plus specialist statistics applications in insurance
  • IT skills relevant to actuaries
  • methods and techniques appropriate to the mathematics of finance, finance and financial reporting, and financial economics
  • the principles of economics as relevant to actuaries
  • methods and techniques appropriate to survival models.
  • the core areas of actuarial practice
  • aspects of the core subject areas from the perspective of a commercial or industrial organisation.

Intellectual skills

You gain the following intellectual abilities:

  • a reasonable understanding of the programme's main body of knowledge
  • skills in calculation and manipulation of the material written in the programme
  • to be able to apply a range of concepts and principles in various contexts
  • how to present a logical argument
  • to solve problems by various appropriate methods
  • IT skills
  • research, presentation and report-writing skills
  • the ability to work with relatively little guidance
  • the intellectual skills required in the context of a commercial or industrial organisation.

Subject-specific skills

You gain actuarial-science skills in the following:

  • mathematical and statistical techniques, and in their application to solving actuarial problems
  • use of industry-specific IT and software skills
  • an understanding of the practical applications of the subject material in insurance
  • the ability to develop simple actuarial computer models to solve actuarial problems and interpret and communicate the results
  • the application of subject-specific skills specified for the programme from the perspective of a commercial or industrial organisation.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in the following:

  • problem-solving skills in relation to qualitative and quantitative information
  • written and oral communication
  • numeracy and computation
  • information-retrieval, in relation to primary and secondary information sources, including online computer searches
  • word-processing and other IT skills including spreadsheets and internet communication
  • interpersonal skills such as the ability to interact with other people and to engage in team-working
  • time-management and organisation and the ability to plan and implement efficient and effective modes of working
  • study skills needed for continuing professional development.

Careers

Our programme is fully accredited by the Actuarial profession. Through your studies, you acquire communication skills, the ability to work in a team and independently, and learn how to present information clearly and concisely.

Our graduates have found work as trainee actuaries in financial management, insurance companies and consultancy practices, the Government Actuary’s Department, the stock exchange and other areas of financial management, or have gone on to further study.

Professional recognition

Our degree can give exemption from the core technical subjects (CT1 to CT8) of the professional examinations set by the UK actuarial profession, and gives a firm foundation for the later specialist technical subjects. Graduates may also get exemption from some of the examinations set by the Chartered Insurance Institute.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

AAA at including Mathematics grade A including the core syllabus of Pure Mathematics (Use of Maths is not accepted). Only one General Studies and Critical Thinking can be accepted against the requirements

Access to HE Diploma

The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

IB Diploma 34 points overall or 17 at HL including 6 in HL Mathematics

International students

The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

University funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our funding opportunities for 2017 entry have not been finalised but will be updated on our funding page in due course.

Government funding

You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

The Government has confirmed that EU students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year will still have access to student funding support for the duration of their course.

Scholarships

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. The scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our scholarships pages.

The scholarship is also extended to those who achieve AAB at A level (or specified equivalents) where one of the subjects is either Mathematics or a Modern Foreign Language. Please review the eligibility criteria.

Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources

Read our student profiles

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Fees

The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £9250 £13810

As a guide only, UK/EU/International students on an approved year abroad for the full 2017/18 academic year pay an annual fee of £1,350 to Kent for that year. Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. Please note that for 2017/18 entrants the University will increase the standard year in industry fee for home/EU/international students to £1,350.

The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

In accordance with changes announced by the UK Government, we are increasing our 2017/18 regulated full-time tuition fees for new and returning UK/EU fee paying undergraduates from £9,000 to £9,250. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise from £4,500 to £4,625. This was subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. This fee will ensure the continued provision of high-quality education.

For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

Key Information Sets


The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

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The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000

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