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Undergraduate Courses 2017
Applying through clearing?
Clearing applicants and others planning to start in 2016 should view Mathematics including a Foundation Year for 2016 entry.

Mathematics including a Foundation Year - BSc (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

Mathematics is important to the modern world. All quantitative science, including both physical and social sciences, is based on it. It provides the theoretical framework for physical science, statistics and data analysis as well as computer science. Our programmes reflect this diversity and the excitement generated by new discoveries within mathematics that affect not only the technicalities of science but also our general understanding of the world in which we live.

After completing the foundation year you will have the option to continue to one of the following programmes: Mathematics - BSc (Hons), Mathematics and Statistics - BSc (Hons), Mathematics and Accounting and Finance - BA (Hons), Financial Mathematics - BSc (Hons). All single honours Mathematics degrees (except Mathematics with Secondary Education) offer the option of spending a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. We can offer help and advice in finding a placement.

 

Independent rankings

In the National Student Survey 2015, 93% of Mathematics students were satisfied with the overall quality of their course.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Foundation year

If your qualifications are not sufficient, for whatever reason, for direct entry onto a degree programme, you can apply for this programme.

Find out more about the benefits of a Foundation Year.

Possible modules may include:

MA022 - Graphs, Geometry and Trigonometry (15 credits)

This module will focus on the topics which are fundamental across mathematics and the sciences. We will learn about the properties of many functions such as straight lines, quadratics, circles, exponentials, logarithms and the trigonometric functions. The focus of this module is on applied problem solving in many real-life situations, as well as some coverage of the rigorous theory behind many of these ideas. The material is delivered through lectures and examples classes, so that students have many different ways to learn. Many harder, extra-curricular examples are provided for keen students.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA024 - Additional Mathematics (15 credits)

Featured in this module are many topics from the Further Maths syllabus, such as complex numbers, matrices, series, proof by induction and many more. As well as giving a solid grounding in the theoretical aspects of the featured topics, where possible we combine these topics to show how they interlink naturally. Studying this module will give a strong preparation for Stage 1 study, wherein many of the topics are covered in a deeper and more theoretical way. The study methods are a mixture of lectures and examples classes, with difficult and abstract examples for students who would like to push themselves.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA025 - Foundation Statistics (15 credits)

Statistical techniques are a fundamental tool in being able to measure, analyse and communicate information about sets of data. Even the most basic methods can be indispensable in applied sciences and other quantitative areas and in this module we demonstrate why this is the case. In addition to learning about the common methods used in Statistics and how these can be applied meaningfully to other disciplines, we cover theoretical properties of Statistics.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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MA026 - Mathematical Workshops (30 credits)

This module has a unique teaching format which is designed specifically to develop the independent study skills that you will need throughout the remainder of your degree. The sessions are taught through a mixture of lecturing and self-study examples, with the focus being on covering familiar techniques in a new light and learning some completely new subject areas. The topics in this module will help you a lot in the more abstract elements of Stage 1 and beyond. As well as covering logic and set theory, other topics may include an introduction to combinatorics, graph theory and abstract algebra.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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MA027 - Calculus for Foundation Year Mathematics (15 credits)

Although differentiation and integration are studied in A-Level mathematics, their combined study, called Calculus, is only briefly covered in a theoretical sense before University level. In this module we consider a much deeper study of Calculus, developing techniques and problem solving skills which will be used repeatedly in Stage 1 and also in Stage 2. The theme of this module is that common techniques in Calculus will be studied from first principles, fully explaining the development of differentiation and integration and justifying their widespread use in mathematics and science.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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EL021 - Calculus (15 credits)

Lecture Syllabus



Differentiation

Graphical interpretation of a derivative and its numerical estimation

Differentiation of y = x squared from first principles

Differentiation of x to the power of n and polynomials by inference

Stationary values (turning points, Max and Min)

Differentiation of trigonometric functions

Differentiation of exponential functions

Differentiation of logarithmic functions

Differentiation of sums, products, quotients and functions of a function

Maclaurens series for sin x, cos x, e to the power of x, ln (1+x), (1+x) to the power of n



Integration

Comprehension and use of the integral notation symbol

Integration as the inverse operation of differentiation Constant of integration

Integration of polynomials, trigonometric functions and exponential functions

Integration of products and fractions

Integration by substitution (change of variables)

Integration by parts

Use of partial fractions

Integration of compound trigonometric functions

Calculation of the constant of integration

Integration as the process of summation

Definite integrals – calculations of areas

Simple first order differential equations – solution by the method of separation of variables.



Coursework.



Examples Class

Differentiation - 4 hours

Integration - 5 hours

Assessed by 2 tests in conjunction with MA022



Homework

Calculus x 4

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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EL033 - Introduction to programming using MATLAB (15 credits)

Lecture Syllabus



INTRODUCTION TO MATLAB – 20 Lectures



An introduction to the use of computers and the process of programming them

Introduction to the MATLAB programming environment

MATLAB basics: Variables and Arrays, Displaying Output Data, Data Files, Operations

Built-in MATLAB Functions

Branching statements and Loops

An introduction to problem solving techniques and the Program development cycle

Program design tools: Flowcharts and Pseudocode

User-defined functions

Introduction to Plotting: Two-Dimensional, Three-Dimensional, Multiple Plots and Animation

Additional data types: Cell arrays, Structures and Graphics handles.



Coursework



22 hours terminal based exercises integrated with the lectures. This will take the form of 11, 2-hour exercises during the year of which 6 will be assessed.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HI434 - Introduction to the History of Science (15 credits)

Science has arguably been the greatest force for cultural change in the last 500 years. Scientists have changed the way we see the world, the way we see ourselves, and have equipped us with technologies that enable us to fly in the sky and shoot neutrinos under the ground. They have taught us that our observations can shift the nature of physics, yet that we are nothing more than jumped-up apes. This module visits some of the most important events and developments since the so-called ‘scientific revolution’ (c. 1700) in order to give a representative view of the history of science. It also introduces key themes that have been pursued by historians science that collectively call into question some key assumptions about what science is really like.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LZ036 - Academic Skills Development (15 credits)

Through this module, students will develop the transferable linguistic and academic skills necessary to successfully complete all the other modules on the IFP. The programme of study will cover academic writing, reading, speaking and listening skills.

Students’ entry language level (e.g. IELTS score) will determine whether they take LZ037 English for Academic Study in the first term and LZ026 in the second (IELTS < 6.0) or LZ026 in the first term and LZ035 Academic Project in the second (IELTS = 6.0). Students will then be grouped according to language ability and academic focus for Humanities and Social Sciences, with the Electronics and Computing students composing a separate group focusing on specific linguistic and academic skills for their pathways.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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LZ037 - English for Academic Study (15 credits)

Through this module, students will develop the transferable linguistic and academic skills necessary to successfully complete all the other modules on the IFP. The programme of study focuses on grammar, vocabulary and academic writing skills.

The module begins with an intensive revision of language structures and goes on to embed these structures into academic writing. Students will learn key steps in the writing process and be introduced to a range of written academic genres. Throughout the module, students will also develop their academic vocabulary through reading and writing tasks specially designed for this.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PH020 - Algebra and Arithmetic (15 credits)

  • Arithmetic

    Calculations.

    Significant figures.

    Standard form.

    Fractions

    Simplification of fractions.

    Percentages and fractional changes.

    Errors.

    Indices.

    Logarithms and exponential functions.



  • Algebra

    Basic rules (operations and indices).

    Solving equations (substitution and order of operation).

    Changing subject of a formula

    Inverse operations

    Rules of indices

    Long division

    Expansion

    Factorisation

    Quadratics equation

    Solving linear equations.

    Solving simultaneous linear equations

    Partial fractions.

    Binomial Theorem.

    Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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  • PL310 - Introduction to Philosophy: Logic and Reasoning (15 credits)

    Since Plato's Dialogues, it has been part of philosophical enquiry to consider philosophical questions using logic and common sense alone. This module aims to train students to continue in that tradition. In the first part students will be introduced to basic themes in introductory logic and critical thinking. In the second part students will be presented with a problem each week in the form of a short argument, question, or philosophical puzzle and will be asked to think about it without consulting the literature. The problem, and students’ responses to it, will then form the basis of a structured discussion.

    By the end of the module, students (a) will have acquired a basic logical vocabulary and techniques for the evaluation of arguments; (b) will have practised applying these techniques to selected philosophical topics; and (c) will have acquired the ability to look at new claims or problems and to apply their newly acquired argumentative and critical skills in order to generate philosophical discussions of them.It will be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars in the first half of the term, and seminars only in the second half of the term.

    Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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    Teaching & Assessment

    Teaching amounts to approximately 16 hours of lectures and classes per week. Modules that involve programming or working with computer software packages usually include practical sessions.

    The majority of Stage 1 modules are assessed by end-of-year examinations. Many Stage 2 and 3 modules include coursework which normally counts for 20% of the final assessment. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your final degree result.

    Programme aims

    The programme aims to:

    • equip students with the technical appreciation, skills and knowledge appropriate to a degree in mathematics
    • develop students’ facilities of rigorous reasoning and precise expression
    • develop students’ abilities to formulate and solve mathematical problems
    • encourage an appreciation of recent developments in mathematics and of the links between the theory of mathematics and its practical application
    • provide students with a logical, mathematical approach to solving problems
    • provide students with an enhanced capacity for independent thought and work
    • ensure students are competent in the use of information technology and are familiar with computers and the relevant software
    • provide students with opportunities to study advanced topics in mathematics, engage in research at some level, and develop communication and personal skills.

    Learning outcomes

    Knowledge and understanding

    You gain knowledge and understanding of:

    • the core principles of calculus, algebra, mathematical methods, discrete mathematics, analysis and linear algebra
    • statistics in the areas of probability and inference
    • information technology as relevant to mathematicians
    • methods and techniques of mathematics
    • the role of logical mathematical argument and deductive reasoning.

    Intellectual skills

    You develop your intellectual skills in the following areas:

    • the ability to demonstrate a reasonable understanding of mathematics
    • the calculation and manipulation of the material written within the programme
    • the ability to apply a range of concepts and principles in various contexts
    • the ability to use logical argument
    • the ability to solve mathematical problems by various methods
    • the relevant computer skills
    • the ability to work independently.

    Subject-specific skills

    You gain subject-skills in the following areas:

    • the ability to demonstrate knowledge of key mathematical concepts and topics, both explicitly and by applying them to the solution of problems
    • the ability to comprehend problems, abstract the essentials of problems and formulate them mathematically and in symbolic form so as to facilitate their analysis and solution
    • the use of computational and more general IT facilities as an aid to mathematical processes
    • the presentation of mathematical arguments and conclusions with clarity and accuracy.

    Transferable skills

    You gain transferable skills in the following areas:

    • problem-solving skills, relating to qualitative and quantitative information
    • communication skills
    • numeracy and computational skills
    • information-retrieval skills, in relation to primary and secondary information sources, including through on-line computer searches
    • information technology skills such as word-processing, spreadsheet use and internet communication
    • time-management and organisational skills, as shown by the ability to plan and implement effective modes of working
    • study skills needed for continuing professional development.

    Careers

    Those students who choose to take the year in industry option find the practical experience they gain gives them a real advantage in the graduate job market. Through your studies, you also acquire many transferable skills including the ability to deal with challenging ideas, to think critically, to write well and to present your ideas clearly, all of which are considered essential by graduate employers.

    Recent graduates have gone into careers in medical statistics, the pharmaceutical industry, the aerospace industry, software development, teaching, actuarial work, Civil Service statistics, chartered accountancy, the oil industry and postgraduate research.

    Entry requirements

    Home/EU students

    The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

    Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
    A level

    Applications are individually considered. Please contact an Admissions Officer

    Access to HE Diploma

    The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

    BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

    The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

    International Baccalaureate

    Applications are individually considered please contact an Admissions Officer.

    International students

    The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

    Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways.

    Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
    English Language Requirements

    Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

    Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

    General entry requirements

    Please also see our general entry requirements.

    Funding

    Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our funding opportunities for 2017 entry have not been finalised. However, details of our proposed funding opportunities for 2016 entry can be found on our funding page.  

    General scholarships

    Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

    The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

    At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. Details of the scholarship for 2017 entry have not yet been finalised. However, for 2016 entry, the scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our scholarships pages. Please review the eligibility criteria on that page. 

    Enquire or order a prospectus

    Resources

    Read our student profiles

    Contacts

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    Enquiries

    T: +44 (0)1227 827272

    Fees

    The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

    UK/EU Overseas
    Full-time £9250 £13810

    The fees quoted above are the annual fees for the degree element of the course.  As a guide only, the 2016/17 fees for the foundation year are £6,000 for home/EU students and £12,470 for overseas students.  Please note that for 2017/18 entrants the University intends to increase the standard foundation fee for home/EU students to £9,000. 

    The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

    The University of Kent intends to increase its regulated full-time tuition fees for all Home and EU undergraduates starting in September 2017 from £9,000 to £9,250. This is subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise by 2.8%.

    For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

    Key Information Sets


    The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

    If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

    The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

    *Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

    Publishing Office - © University of Kent

    The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000