Psychology for University Study - LZ040

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2017-18 2018-19
Canterbury Yearlong
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3 30 (15)
Canterbury Spring and Summer
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3 30 (15) MR L Gonidis

Pre-requisites

Spring Start Accelerated Programme:
Co-requisite modules include: LZ036 Academic Skills Development (15 credits) and either LZ035 Foundation Project (15 credits) OR LZ037 English for Academic Study (15 credits), along with two other 30 credit modules on the International Foundation Programme. (8 modules are available on the Spring programme)
Autumn Start:
Co-requisite modules include: LZ036 Academic Skills Development (15 credits) and either LZ035 Foundation Project (15 credits) OR LZ037 English for Academic Study (15 credits), along with two other 30 credit modules on the International Foundation Programme.

This module is available to JYA students

Restrictions

None

2017-18

Overview

This module introduces students to the study of psychology, with the aim of providing an introductory understanding of key topics within psychology and seminal psychological research. The module will explore psychology as a Science and the research methods common in psychological research. The lectures will cover some of the key concepts and findings in the study of abnormal psychology, sensation, consciousness, child psychology, motivation, emotion, memory and attitudes, group processes (all in term 1) and evolutionary psychology, personality, visual perception, social-cognitive psychology, health psychology and psychobiology (all in term 2). This module encourages students to explore classical modules in psychology within the context of cutting edge research and contemporary issues in modern society. There is a particular interest in how psychology and concepts within the subject can inform controversial issues in every day society.

Details

This module appears in:


Contact hours

Contact hours per week

Spring Start: Two hours of lecture, two hours of seminar per week, and a one hour workshop over 10 weeks in the Spring Term (50hrs), 10 weeks in the Summer Term (50hrs). In addition students will be expected to spend 200 hours in private study over the 20 weeks. The total number of study hours equals 300.

Autumn Start: Two hours of lecture, one hour of seminar, and a one hour workshop per week over 11 weeks in the Autumn and 11 weeks in the Spring Term (88 hours), 2 weeks in the Summer Term (8hrs). In addition, students will be expected to spend 204 hours in private study over the 24 weeks. The total number of study hours equals 300.

Method of assessment

Coursework will account for 60% of the overall mark, consisting of:
Term One:
Written Assignment (1,000 words) (15%)
In Course Test (45 minutes) (15%)

Term Two:
Written Assignment (1,500 words) (25%)
Seminar Participation (over two terms) (5%)
Final Examination of both terms' work will account for 40% of the overall mark (2 hours)

Preliminary reading

American Psychological Association (2009). Publication Manual of The American Psychological Association (6th Ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Carlson, N. R., Martin, G. N. & Buskist, W. (2009). Psychology (Fourth European Edition). Harlow: Pearson Education.

Hogg, M. A., & Vaughan, G. M. (2008). Social Psychology (5th Ed.). Harlow: Pearson Education Ltd.

Gleitman, H., Reisburg, D., & Gross, J. J. (2011). Psychology (8th Ed.). New York: W. W. Norton & Co.

Kalat, J. W. (2009). Biological Psychology (10th Ed.). Belmont, California: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Burger, J. M. (2010). Personality (8th Ed.). Belmont, California: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Additional readings will be recommended from this text and online sources in each lecture.

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course students will be able to:
o Demonstrate introductory understanding and knowledge of psychology and its research methods.
o Show a familiarity and awareness of how key concepts in psychology relate to current and contemporary issues in modern society.
o Show an awareness of sub-disciplines within Psychology and how these relate to each other.
o Demonstrate introductory understanding and knowledge of abnormal psychology, sensation, consciousness, child psychology, motivation, emotion, memory and attitudes, group processes (all term 1) and evolutionary psychology, personality, visual perception, social-cognitive psychology, health psychology and psychobiology (all term 2).
o Select, evaluate and use relevant information from a range of textual formats (e.g. quantitative, tabular and graphic data, reports, textbooks and articles) relevant to the study of Psychology.

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