Sociology for University Study - LZ003

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2017-18 2018-19
Canterbury
(version 2)
Autumn and Spring
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3 30 (15) MRS M Hall
Canterbury
(version 2)
Spring and Summer
View Timetable
3 30 (15)

Pre-requisites

Spring Start Accelerated Programme:
Co-requisite modules include: LZ036 Academic Skills Development (15 credits) and either LZ035 Foundation Project (15 credits) OR LZ037 English for Academic Study (15 credits) along with a choice of two other 30 credit modules on the International Foundation Programme (8 modules are available on the Spring programme).
Autumn Start Programme: co-requisite modules include: LZ036 Academic Skills Development (15 credits) and LZ035 Foundation Project (15 credits) OR LZ037 English for Academic Study (15 credits) along with a choice of two other 30 credit modules on the International Foundation Programme.
This module is also available to JYA students.

Restrictions

None

2017-18

Overview

The module will be divided into six main topics of study which are intended to challenge the student to ask questions about their social world and to explore their own individual and cultural experiences within a wider context. In particular, students are encouraged to examine their common-sense assumptions by 'thinking sociologically'. To do this requires not only the development of a sociological imagination but also the use of appropriate methodology and theoretical approaches. This module will introduce these skills to students through a consideration of a number of topics such as: the sociological imagination; classical sociologists; the age of modernity/postmodernity; families and intimate relationships; sex/gender and gender relations; globalisation; poverty in Britain; education in Britain.

Details

This module appears in:


Contact hours

Autumn start:
The module will be delivered as a weekly two-hour lecture comprising presentations and followed by a seminar discussion of that week's reading assignment. A further one hour workshop will allow students to work through challenging concepts or issues that arise from the week's text. Total contact hours over two terms of 11 weeks each will amount to 88 hours. The summer term will follow the same teaching pattern over a two week revision period, adding a further 8 hours. Students will be expected to spend an addition 204 hours reading not only the set text but also texts related to the topic under consideration. Participants can therefore expect to spend about 300 learning hours on the module.

Spring start
Two hours of lecture, two hours of seminar per week and a one hour workshop over 10 weeks in the Spring Term (50 hours), 10 weeks in the Summer Term (50 hours). In addition, students will be expected to spend 200 hours in private study per week over the 20 weeks.

Cost

£29

Method of assessment

Coursework will account for 60% of the overall mark, consisting of:
Term One:
Written Assignment (1,000 words) (15%)
In Course Test (45 minutes) (15%)

Term Two:
Written Assignment (1,500 words) (25%)
Seminar Participation (over two terms) (5%)
Final Examination of both terms' work will account for 40% of the overall mark (2 hours)

Preliminary reading

Bilton, T (2002) Introductory Sociology, Basingstoke, Palgrave
Giddens, A (2013) Sociology (7th Ed.), Cambridge, Polity (core text)
Haralambos, M & Holborn (2013) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives, London, Harper Collins
Fulcher, J & Scott, J (2007) Sociology, Oxford, OUP
Scott, J & Marshall, G (2009) A Dictionary of Sociology, Oxford, OUP

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

On successfully completing the module students will be able to:
1. describe the main features of the discipline of sociology
2. investigate and analyse key sociological arguments
3. formulate ideas in a systematic way based on sociological theories in both spoken and written form
4. think analytically and critically regarding sociological source material
5. use sociological theory and research in the context of debates on social issues
6. look at social trends relevant to an understanding of British society

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