School of Anthropology & Conservation

Excellence in diversity Global in reach


BA (Hons) Liberal Arts

 

See the world from a range of perspectives: political, cultural, historical and economic.


Indo-Persian brass astrolabe,1666 Credit - Science Museum / Science & Society Picture Library -- All rights reserved.

WHY STUDY WITH US?

  • Liberal Arts enables you to see the complexity of the world from a range of perspectives – political, cultural, historical, scientific and economic – and develops your critical understanding of how they affect and interact with one another.  
  • Experience a unique interdisciplinary approach to teaching and research that can better prepare you for the professional world of the 21st century.
  • Interact with staff members, many of whom are leading and award-winning specialists, from across the humanities and physical and social sciences.
  • Make the most of the compulsory Year Abroad at a choice of excellent Universities in many countries or make arrangements for a placement abroad with an NGO.
  • Enhance your practical knowledge and communication skills through language learning and your own independent research project.
  • Benefit from small group seminars (12 to 15 students) on our Core modules and of living together in first-class accommodation during your first year on campus.
  • Develop your interests through student-selected modules and with guidance from your academic advisers.
  • Enjoy the state-of-the-art facilities of the School of Anthropology and Conservation and the extensive printed and electronic collections of the Templeman Library.
  • Be part of a vibrant community of students and staff hosting seminars, field trips, debates etc. enriching your experience and transferable skills.
  • Kent is exceptional in having maths and sciences training built into the syllabus, through our links with the Q-Step programme in quantitative research as an example. In a recent article in the Financial Times, columnist Gillian Tett points out the rarity of Liberal Arts programmes in the UK, and believes those which integrate such disciplines across faculties prove particularly beneficial for creative thinking and career opportunities.
  • Find out more in the Liberal Arts programme brochure

Year/Stage 1

(a total of 120 credits to be taken)

Required Modules

  • SE310: Modes of Reasoning

One of the impediments to communication between different academic disciplines is their uses of different ways of making, and validating, arguments and proofs. This module examines the varying modes of developing scientific, social scientific and humanities discourses to facilitate cross-disciplinary understanding of qualitative and quantitative reasoning.

  • SE312: Roots of Transformation

Ways of thinking are shaped in often unseen ways by changes in the technologies we use to move, to communicate, to exchange and to create. This module examines the technological and economic revolutions that shape human cultures, with a particular focus both on the 19th and early 20th century roots of modernity and the impacts of recent and developing technological innovations on our ways of imagining ourselves and others.

  • SE311: Understanding the Contemporary

Current events are shaped by a wide field of forces – economics, ideologies, demographics, environments and more. This module calls on students to be aware of current events and developments across a wide range of contexts and disciplines. It encourages multi-dimensional understandings of the contemporary world – from the perspective of the arts, the social sciences, history and politics – in order to gain a broad vision of the world and the means of conceptualising how to affect and change it.

  • 30 credits in a chosen language (either building on previous language learning or starting with a new language).

Languages chosen by this year’s (2014-15) students are: Italian, Japanese, Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese, and Arabic.

Optional modules - Students are encouraged to take modules from across the university -- i.e. Humanities, Social Sciences and Sciences -- and the following list indicates the choices this year’s (2014-15) first year students have made. There are, of course, some modules in some faculties which may not be available because of prerequisites or size limitations, but Liberal Arts faculty will endeavour to ensure that students can access the modules that they wish to take and that make sense in terms of their academic interests

This year’s students chose the following first year modules:

HI434: Introduction to the History of Science

SE301: Social Anthropology

CP318: Introduction to Contemporary European and Hispanic Cinemas

PS301: Introduction to Forensic Science

SO334: Modern Culture

SO336: Sociology of Everyday Life

SP304: Introduction to Psychology I

SP305: Introduction to Psychology II

CL336: Aegean Archaeology

HA361: Introduction to Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art

PO325: Introduction to Conflict Analysis and Resolution

FR308: Questions of French Cinema

BI324: Genetics and Evolution

FR310: Twentieth Century France in Crisis

CL315: Classical Mythology:Themes and Approaches

SO335: Contemporary Culture

SE309: Violence and Conflict in the Contemporary World

Further details can be found in the online prospectus: Undergraduate Courses 2015.

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Year/Stage 2

(a total of 120 credits to be taken)

Required Modules

  • Connections 1 & 2

One of the core concepts behind the Liberal Arts degree is maintaining communication and debate between the diverse groups of students the programme attracts. Through collective discussion and debate around seminal readings, this module provides you with a broad-ranging grasp of the full field of social sciences, physical sciences, arts and humanities.

  • 30 credits in a chosen language (either building on previous language learning or starting with a new language).

Languages chosen by this year’s (2014-15) students are: Italian, Japanese, Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese, and Arabic.

Optional modules may be chosen from a very wide range available across the University. 30 credits worth to be selected and approved by the programme director.

Further details can be found in the online prospectus: Undergraduate Courses 2015.

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Year 3 - Year Abroad

All students spend the year between Stages 2 and 3 studying or working abroad. Kent has strong links with top-ranking institutions in Western and Eastern Europe, North and South America, China, Hong Kong, Japan and Thailand. Liberal Arts students will have the opportunity of spending their third year at an appropriate partner university. Tuition fees will be waived or substantially reduced for the Year Abroad; see the University's Go Abroad webpage: http://www.kent.ac.uk/goabroad/cost.html

The Year Abroad will be assessed through a series of written reports on your activities and their pertinence to the aims of Liberal Arts. Whilst overseas, you will have weekly contact by Skype and/or email with an assigned supervisor and will, when appropriate, be visited on site. Please see the Go Abroad webpages for further details.

Alternatively, students may choose to spend the year as an intern in a non-governmental organisation (NGO), research centre, business or industry.

Further details can be found in the online prospectus: Undergraduate Courses 2015.

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Year 4 (Stage 3)

(a total of 120 credits to be taken)

Required Modules

  • Landscapes of the Future 1 & 2

What is the terrain of the world we're moving into and what does it demand? Through the preceding three years, the Liberal Arts degree has worked to provide you with a multidisciplinary perspective on the past and the present. In the final year, students come together to think of how that knowledge can be projected into the future. The module covers questions of environmental challenges and responses; politics, the state and the meaning of democracy; the potentialities of scientific development; the necessity of innovation and intervention; and the imagining of crises and responses to these. The module provides a forum for discussing and preparing students' individual research projects.

  • Liberal Arts Dissertation

Your second compulsory module in your final year is the Dissertation. You will be able to focus on a topic related to your Year Abroad or on a research question of your choosing. You will have the guidance of an assigned supervisor, who will help you to develop and communicate a sustained piece of research.

Optional modules may be chosen from a very wide range available across the University. 60 credits worth to be selected and approved by the programme director.

Further details can be found in the online prospectus: Undergraduate Courses 2015.

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According to recent employment statistics, Kent graduates are doing better than ever in the changeable job market. 94% of graduates are in employment or full time-education within 6 months of graduating from the University.
Liberal Arts gives you the grounding for many employment opportunities. The skills that we give our students are the ones desired most by employers. These include:

  • knowledge and understanding of the contemporary world
  • the abilities to reason, to adapt to new challenges and to master new ideas
  • personal initiative and creative thinking
  • teamwork and leadership
  • versatility
  • language proficiency in both English and a second (or third) language
Potential employers include local, regional and national UK government departments, voluntary organisations and the private sector, as well as European and international organisations. Many of our graduates will also go on to postgraduate study and careers in academia or research.

The skills that Liberal Arts will give you are:

  • The ability to reason and to analyse qualitative and quantitative data
  • The ability to communicate your findings effectively in written and oral forms
  • The ability to adapt to new ideas from a range of disciplines
  • A solid grounding in a second (or third) language
  • Teamwork and leadership
  • Personal initiative – including agile and creative thought
  • Critical and analytical skills

These skills will not only equip you for a rapidly changing world but also for postgraduate study. You will not only be able to adapt to jobs just coming into being but also to invent new ones with the experience you will have gained from either the Year Abroad or a placement with an NGO, business or industry.

School of Anthropology and Conservation - © University of Kent

School of Anthropology and Conservation, Marlowe Building, The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NR, T: +44 (0)1227 827056

Last Updated: 04/02/2016