Modern Languages

European Culture - MA

Paris

Kent's new MA in European Culture makes it possible to study the history, literature, and political philosophies of the continent while based in Paris, Europe's cultural capital.

Overview

Europe is at the heart of many contemporary political debates, and is a geographically, linguistically and culturally diverse continent with a rich history. From the French Revolution to the European Union, Europe has long been a placeholder for any number of utopian, internationalist aspirations. To trace the history of the cultural constructions of Europe is to hold a mirror up to its changing intellectual faces.

The programme is offered by the Department of Modern Languages, and benefits from staff expertise in a variety of disciplines across the School of European Culture and Languages.  The MA offers you the chance to immerse yourself fully in European culture in order to enhance your linguistic skills and cultural understanding. Kent's Paris School of Arts and Culture is based at Reid Hall, where authors and philosophers such as Barthes, Beauvoir and Derrida have lectured, and in the heart of historic Montparnasse, where Picasso and Modigliani had their studios. 

The programme consists of one core module, 'The Idea of Europe', and three further taught modules, followed by a final dissertation. All modules are taught in English.

This is an ideal programme for anyone with an interest in the rapidly changing political history of Europe, in its diverse literature, or in the experience and independence gained from living and studying overseas for an extended period of time.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, modern languages and linguistics was ranked 3rd for research quality, 3rd for research output and in the top 20 for research intensity, research impact and research power in the UK.

Our submission was the highest ranked nationally to include modern languages – a testament to our position as the UK's European university. An impressive 100% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School's environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

 

Course structure

You take one core module, 'The Idea of Europe' which will equip you with the methodological and historical framework for the MA as a whole. You then take three further taught modules offered at the University of Kent's Paris centre before undertaking a final dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SCL800 - The Idea of Europe (30 credits)

From the French Revolution to the European Union, the term 'Europe' has long been a placeholder for a large number of utopian, internationalist aspirations. These aspirations are necessarily culturally and politically contingent; to trace the history of cultural constructions of Europe is to hold a mirror up to its changing intellectual faces. Focusing on a series of influential texts published at significant moments in the recent history of the continent, this module investigates how the changing ‘idea of Europe’ reflects the changing priorities of cultural discourse. In particular, it considers the key role – but also contested – played by Paris in particular as a European cultural capital, central to the idea of Europe and to the development of European culture. The texts studied on this module range across disciplines and genres, and include poems and pamphlets, essays and lectures, philosophy and politics. Through studying these texts in their socio-political contexts, the idea of Europe is triangulated through reference to a number of key categories (e.g. ‘prophecy’; ‘crisis’; ‘utopia’; Europe as ‘conservative’; Europe as ‘progressive’). The overall aim of this module is to explore what it means to be – in Friedrich Nietzsche’s words – a ‘good European’, and to consider the central role played by Paris in the emergence of modern European culture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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TH830 - Religion and European Thought (Paris) (30 credits)

In recent decades European intellectual culture has seen a turn towards the post-secular, the post-critical, the “return” of religion, or, as Claude Lefort described it “the permanency of the theologico-political”. Such gestures invite a rethinking of the political, social, and intellectual role of “religion” in the recent history of European thought. Such reworking intimately affects the understanding of Europe within a scene of global political and economic development, European traditions of philosophy, concepts of political autonomy; its critical theories of culture and economy, links between the idea of Europe and democratic political foundations; and the nature of artistic, social, and psychological exploration. This course creates capacities to interact with and to intervene in these important and on-going cultural discussions by developing new maps of “religion” as a central preoccupation in the formation of European intellectual identity, with a strong focus on Paris and the history of religion in “French theory” (e.g the works of Badiou, Benslama, Derrida and Foucault).

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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AR848 - Theory and History of Urban Design (30 credits)

This module explores the idea of the city, and the major concepts related to urban life. It analyses and determines the conditions of their emergence within a broader cultural context. It traces how these concepts have changed through time, with the aim of enhancing our present understanding of cities and their regeneration. It follows the development of city planning and the establishment of planned, ideal cities as a political goal up to the foundation of new towns. In its dealing with historically modern cities, the module centres on case studies of cities representative of urbanism from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, drawing lessons from the methods and types of documentation used in its development. The course also introduces the manner in which architecture has generated a number of spontaneous and critical responses to the demands of the city in the past four decades. The arguments are drawn from sources in architectural and urban theory, philosophy, art history, anthropology, literary sources and social sciences.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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EN893 - Fiction 2 (30 credits)

In this module you will learn further techniques of writing fiction, including how to plot a full-length novel, work on deep characterisation and the construction of an intellectual framework within your fiction. You may be continuing to work on a project begun in Fiction 1, or starting something new. Rather than expecting you to try new techniques, voices and styles, your tutor will work with you to identify your strongest mode of writing and will encourage you to develop this.

Your tutor will supply you with a reading list before the start of the module.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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EN894 - Poetry 2 (30 credits)

The main focus of Poetry 2 is to further develop and refine your writing with the eventual aim of producing a successful dissertation portfolio of fully realised, finished poems. Poetry 2 differs from Poetry 1 in that you are encouraged to develop a sequence or series of wholly new poems.



In this module you will develop your practice of writing poetry through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and constructive feedback on your own work. Each week, you will be exposed to a wide range of exemplary, contemporary sequences. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical rather than historical; at every point priority is given to your own particular development as poets.



The reading list does not represent a curriculum as such, but indicates the range of works and traditions we will draw upon to stimulate new thought about your own work. Decisions about reading will be taken in response to individual interests. Likewise, you will be directed toward work which will be of particular benefit to you.



The main focus of Poetry 2 is to further develop and refine your writing with the eventual aim of producing a successful dissertation portfolio of fully realised, finished poems. Poetry 2 differs from Poetry 1 in that you are encouraged to develop a sequence or series of wholly new poems.



In this module you will develop your practice of writing poetry through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and constructive feedback on your own work. Each week, you will be exposed to a wide range of exemplary, contemporary sequences. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical rather than historical; at every point priority is given to your own particular development as poets.



The reading list does not represent a curriculum as such, but indicates the range of works and traditions we will draw upon to stimulate new thought about your own work. Decisions about reading will be taken in response to individual interests. Likewise, you will be directed toward work which will be of particular benefit to you.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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EN899 - Paris: The Residency (30 credits)

‘Paris: The Residency’ contributes to the poetry and prose strands of the MA in Creative Writing and the Literature strand of the Paris Programmes. The objective of ‘Paris: The Residency’ is to give students as close an experience as possible of what it might be like to be a writer in residence or retreat, and to produce work inspired by a specific location for a specific period of time. The emphasis will be on producing a body of creative work for the main assessment. This module aims to enable students to develop their practice of writing through both the study of a range of contemporary examples and practices, and constructive feedback on their own work. Throughout their stay, students will be exposed to a wide range of instances of exemplary, contemporary work relating to Paris, or which was written by writers whilst staying, or living in Paris (as suggested by the indicative reading list). They will be encouraged to read as independent writers, to apply appropriate writing techniques to their own practice and to experiment with voice, form and content. The approach to the exemplary texts will be technical as well as historical. At every point in the module, priority will be given to students’ own development as writers. It is an assumption of the module that students will already have a basic competence in the writing of poetry or prose, including a grasp of essential craft and techniques. The purpose of this module will be to stimulate students towards further development of, and to hone their already emerging voices and styles through engaging with various literary texts, raising an awareness of place as the starting point for new writing, and how their work can develop with large chunks of time for independent study, reflection and exploration of a city like Paris.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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EN904 - Modernism and Paris (30 credits)

‘Modernism and Paris’ provides students with an opportunity to study a selection of texts from the UK, USA and mainland Europe, all readily available in English and specifically relevant to both Paris and modernism. The texts are all either inspired by Paris, or are set in, or refer significantly to the city and most were written in Paris. They are chosen for their high literary quality and because they seek new and experimental literary expressions for the experience of modern city life. They also allow exploration of a range of literary forms, including the novel, poetry, prose poems and essays. The module alternates texts by major authors of different nationalities, chronologically ordered, allowing students to appreciate the beginnings and development of modernism in the 19th and 20th centuries. The module recognises the importance of modernist cross-fertilisation between literature and the visual arts and encourages students to explore links between modernist literature and the development of, for example, cubism and surrealism. The primary materials are Paris-focused but are chosen to open an international perspective on literary and cultural contacts and history.

The module is taught mainly through a weekly two-hour seminar. Students are also encouraged to incorporate into their studies their exploration of the city and their use of relevant local resources such as exhibitions, museums and libraries.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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EN906 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)

The ubiquity of the term diaspora in recent critical debates has been interpreted as the symptom of a shift in perspective in cultural and social studies. This is reflected in the growing significance of diaspora studies which, to some extent, has superseded postcolonial studies as a theoretical framework in explaining those global phenomena in society, culture and literature which are informed by conceptions of the nation state but cannot sufficiently be explained by them. At the same time, tendencies of universalising conceptions of diaspora as they have recently proliferated and the increasingly simplifying and historically undifferentiated usage of the term need to be reconsidered.



Among the various paradigms from which diasporic writing should be distinguished is the literature of exile. Exile is often the consequence of political pressure or disaffection with a society rather than the result of the larger and often spatially and chronologically extended migratory movements which led to the emergence of diasporic communities. While both paradigms may intersect, the concerns and motivations of diasporic and exilic literatures usually differ.



A historically and culturally significant geographical, and frequently also imaginary, point of intersection between the diasporic and the exilic paradigms is the metropolis of Paris. In this module, our comparative focus will be on diasporic and exilic literatures and on the significance of the diasporic or exilic space of the French metropolis, both as production context and as informing literary production.



Arguably, the most famous group of exiles to choose Paris as their temporary home was the generation of American expatriate writers in the 1920s for whom, as J. Gerald Kennedy suggests, Paris 'inescapably reflect[ed] the creation of an exilic self' – Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Djuna Barnes or, after the Second World War, Richard Wright, James Baldwin and Alexander Trocchi or Boris Vian. Other writers of note who, in different times and under different conditions, chose exile in Paris include Heinrich Heine, Oscar Wilde, Rainer Maria Rilke, Samuel Beckett, Heinrich Mann or Anna Seghers, Miguel Ángel Asturias, Czeslaw Milosz, Milan Kundera, Jorge Semprún and Marjane Satrapi or Julio Cortázar, Severo Sarduy, Vargas Llosa, Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Laura Alcoba, Assia Djebar, Nancy Houston and Leila Sebbar. Incorporating aesthetic dimensions, our seminars will explore in particular the extent to which experiences of diaspora and exile inform the work of ‘alien’ writers residing in Paris.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI821 - Film and Modernity Paris (30 credits)

This course examines the medium of film, considering its specific qualities as an art-form and the particular ways in which it is influenced by and influences other artistic and cultural forms in the historical moment of early 20th century Paris. The emphasis of the course varies from year to year, responding to current research and scholarship, but it maintains as its focus the aesthetic strategies of film in contrast with other arts, film's relationship to historical change, particularly as it is developed in the growth of Paris as a city. The course also addresses the particular strategies used by the cinema to communicate with its historical audience. The course explores both the historical place of the cinema within the development of twentieth-century urban culture in Paris as well as how this historical definition informs the development of the cinema.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)

This module is designed to examine the overlapping influence of Early Modern and Enlightenment thinkers and writers mainly based in England, France and Germany. A particular focus is provided by the Parisian setting: several key figures (such as Voltaire, Rousseau and Diderot) lived in Paris for a significant part of their lives, and Paris was a city second to none in its importance within a vast international exchange of ideas during the Enlightenment period. The module will encourage students to consider the historical contexts out of which the various texts emerge, and show how ideas passed between England, France, Germany and elsewhere. Attention will consistently be paid to the tension between Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in Europe. This will include allowing the students to understand debates, in the eighteenth century (and, if appropriate, since then), around the following issues: empiricism; sensationism; toleration; freedom of speech; aesthetics; literary genres; the 'pre-Romantic'.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)

The curriculum includes a selection of texts from various countries, all readily available in English and all specifically relevant to the modern history, evolving population and changing appearance of Paris and to how these aspects of the city has been perceived and represented in literary prose. The set texts are by writers from different periods and of various nationalities and they are all set in and inspired by Paris. The texts are chosen for their high literary quality, but also because they represent essential aspects of the city’s evolution and exemplify various narrative strategies and ways of engaging with the realities of life in the city, always shaped by personal preoccupations and sensibilities. This varied selection within the genre of prose fiction allows study of Zola’s naturalism and his presentation of the political and aesthetic implications of baron Haussman’s plans for urban renewal and control; Edith Wharton’s perspective as an American incomer; André Breton’s combination of oneiric urban encounters with photographic illustrations of the city, inserted into the text; Jean Rhys’s clearly gendered experience of the city in the 1920s and 1930s; the identity of the city as a site for postwar liberation and literary dynamism in the work of expatriates from the Beat generation; and the representation of today’s city as a centre for immigrant communities and cultural diversity. The primary texts are thus all Paris-focussed but are chosen to open an international perspective on the literary representation of an increasingly cosmopolitan city.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA841 - Modern Art in Paris (30 credits)

The module will focus on Paris as a centre of artistic experimentation. The city served as the launch pad for key artistic movements from the mid-19th century through to the period after the Second World War (Impressionism, Cubism, Surrealism, etc.), and as a magnet for budding and established artists from all around the world. The module will take advantage of the great museum collections that encapsulate such developments (Musées d'Arte Moderne and d’Orsay, Rodin and Picasso Museums, Beaubourg, Quai Branly, etc.) and also of the major exhibitions on show in Paris in any given year.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HI890 - Revolution and Resistance (30 credits)

This module, to be taught at the Paris School of Arts and Culture, looks at Paris' revolutionary and resistance past. We cover a two-hundred-year period, beginning with the revolution of 1789 and ending with the student protests of May 1968. We will explore Paris during the two world wars, the Commune of 1871, the 1848 revolution and advances in medicine, science, painting and literature.



The aim of this module is to examine the ways in which Parisian culture, which has long been at the centre of innovation in the fields of architecture, film, literature, art, philosophy and drama, has been transformative. The module is interdisciplinary and will include the analysis of memoirs, oral histories, memorials, instruments, paintings, literary texts, cartoons, posters, film, newspapers, radio and the internet.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation (60 credits)

The topic of the dissertation will usually be based on, and develop from, work undertaken on one or more of the four coursework modules undertaken in the course of the MA. The dissertation must be comparative in nature, including an analysis of more than one work, from more than one national/linguistic tradition.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.

Study support

About the Department of Modern Languages

The Department of Modern Languages includes staff with expertise in the following subject areas: French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian. It is part of the School of European Culture and Languages, which also includes the following departments: Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature, English Language & Linguistics, Philosophy and Religious Studies.

Postgraduate resources

The Templeman Library has excellent holdings in all areas relevant to our research, with particular strengths in 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st-century French literature. The School of European Culture and Languages provides high-quality IT facilities, including state-of-the-art media laboratories, dedicated technical staff and designated areas for postgraduate study. Other facilities include all-purpose teaching rooms, two networked multimedia laboratories and a streamed film library.

Language speaking

Every year, a considerable number of French nationals and native speakers of other foreign languages follow our postgraduate courses, while European exchange students who come to Kent as undergraduates often stay on to do graduate work. We are involved in the Erasmus and Tempus networks, and we also have a team of foreign- French-language lectors who combine undergraduate teaching with study for a Kent higher degree or with writing a dissertation for their home universities. Postgraduate dissertations in French studies at the University of Kent may be written in English or in French. The University of Kent also offers language training, particularly in English, for overseas postgraduates.

Training

The Graduate School offers all postgraduates in the School of European Culture and Languages a wide-ranging programme of training in transferable skills. The School provides training workshops for postgraduate students with teaching responsibilities, bringing together postgraduates from all our subject areas. 

Paris libraries

In Paris, you are encouraged to make full use of the city's cultural resources and to integrate that experience into your studies. The Louvre, Centre Pompidou, Musée d'Orsay, Musée d'Arte Moderne, Grand Palais and other world-class museums and exhibition spaces are on your doorstep.

In addition, you benefit from borrowing rights at the libraries of the University of Paris VII, which have viewing facilities and holdings of films, books and periodicals in English. You also have access to the libraries of University of Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle). Other Paris libraries with relevant holdings include the French National Library, the Centre Georges Pompidou Public Library and the American Library in Paris, to which you are given access and a guided visit.

Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Australian Journal of French StudiesDiderot StudiesDix-neufForum for Modern Language StudiesFrench Cultural StudiesFrench StudiesModern Language ReviewRevue Romane; and Romance Quarterly.

Students based in Paris collaborate with Kent students from other campuses to produce a literary magazine, Le Menteur, which was founded in 2012. Le Menteur specialises in poetry, fiction, essays and visual art. For details, please see http://thementeur.com

Global Skills Award

All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme. The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.  

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the humanities is an extremely versatile qualification that can open the door to exciting career opportunities in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work in the IT industry, academic administration, cultural management and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at UK and overseas universities. 

Additionally, you will benefit from enhanced linguistic skills from your time spent living in Paris while studying at Kent's Paris centre, as well as gain confidence and independence from living overseas. 

Entry requirements

A first or 2.1 in a relevant subject (eg, English, French, German, Italian, Hispanic Studies, Classics), or equivalent.

General entry requirements

All applicants are considered on an individual basis and additional qualifications, and professional qualifications and experience will also be taken into account when considering applications. 

International students

Please see our International Student website for entry requirements by country and other relevant information for your country. 

English language entry requirements

The University requires all non-native speakers of English to reach a minimum standard of proficiency in written and spoken English before beginning a postgraduate degree. Certain subjects require a higher level.

For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. 

Need help with English?

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

Research areas

Centre for Modern European Literature

Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing.

Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre's activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website.

Dr Thomas Baldwin: Reader in French

Nineteenth and 20th-century French literature; representations of art in literature; literary theory and philosophy. 

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Dr Larry Duffy: Senior Lecturer in French

Nineteenth-century French literature, thought and culture; Flaubert, Zola; Houellebecq; realism, naturalism and documentary literature; the body.

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Dr James Fowler: Senior Lecturer in French

Novels, drama and other writings of the 18th century; Diderot and the Enlightenment; prudes and their relation to libertinage; narratology; psychoanalysis; discourses of the body; Richardson’s reception in France.

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Dr Katja Haustein: Lecturer in Comparative Literature

French and German autobiographical writing; visual culture; memory and identity; literature and the emotions; women and gender; art and medicine.

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Professor Ben Hutchinson: Professor of Modern European Literature

Nineteenth and 20th-century German and European literature, especially Rilke, W G Sebald, Jean Améry, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Geoffrey Hill, 20th-century poetry, modernism.

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Dr Lucy O'Meara: Lecturer in French

Literary and cultural theory; aesthetics; Roland Barthes.

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Dr Patricia Novillo-Corvalan: Senior Lecturer in Comparative Literature

Modernism, 20th-century Hispanic and Latin American literature; Borges, Cortázar, Joyce; reception studies; medical humanities.

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Dr Anna Katharina Schaffner: Reader in Comparative Literature

Modernist literature, the history of sexuality, the European avant-garde, the history of medicine and psychoanalysis.

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Dr Axel Staehler: Reader in Comparative Literature

Jewish literature and culture, early modern European festival culture, the 18th-century novel in Europe, intermediality and ‘iconarratology’, postcolonial literature and theory, contact zones and intercultural communication, fundamentalism and literature.

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Professor Shane Weller: Professor of Comparative Literature

European modernism, postmodernism and literary theory; Beckett, Kafka, Blanchot, Celan, Bernhard, Sebald; literature and ethics; literature and philosophy; history of ideas.

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Professor Ben Hutchinson: Professor of Modern European Literature

Nineteenth- and 20th-century German and European literature, especially Rilke, W G Sebald, Jean Améry, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Geoffrey Hill, 20th-century poetry, modernism.

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Professor Ben Hutchinson: Professor of Modern European Literature

Nineteenth and 20th-century German and European literature, especially Rilke, W G Sebald, Jean Améry, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Geoffrey Hill, 20th-century poetry, modernism. 

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Dr Antonio Lazaro-Reboll: Senior Lecturer in Hispanic Studies

Spanish cultural studies and film studies, especially Spanish popular film; the development of film cultures in Spain (reception, consumption and fandom), and the cross-cultural dialogue between Spain and other world cinemas (international traditions of the horror genre, global psychotronic culture); comics studies.

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Dr Antonio Lazaro-Reboll: Senior Lecturer in Hispanic Studies

Spanish cultural studies and film studies, especially Spanish popular film; the development of film cultures in Spain (reception, consumption and fandom), and the cross-cultural dialogue between Spain and other world cinemas (international traditions of the horror genre, global psychotronic culture).

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Ms Mathilde Poizat-Amar: PhD student

Dr William Rowlandson: Senior Lecturer in Hispanic Studies

Cuban art and culture, especially José Lezama Lima; Latin American poets; Borges.

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Dr William Rowlandson: Senior Lecturer in Hispanic Studies

Cuban art and culture, especially José Lezama Lima; the reception outside Cuba of visual and textual representations of the Cuban Revolution and the revolutionary era, in particular the notion of myth, and the creation of an exported national identity through processes of mythologisation; Latin American poets, and the prose and poetry of Borges.

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Dr Natalia Sobrevilla Perea: Reader in Hispanic Studies

State formation and political culture in the Andes from the end of the colonial period throughout the 19th century, as well as issues of race, ethnicity and military culture in the 19th and 20th centuries in South America.

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Dr Natalia Sobrevilla Perea: Reader in Hispanic Studies

State formation and political culture in the Andes from the end of the colonial period throughout the 19th century, as well as issues of race, ethnicity and military culture in the 19th and 20th centuries in South America. Recent publications include: The Caudillo of the Andes: Andrés de Santa Cruz (2011).

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Dr Francesco Capello: Lecturer in Italian

Turn-of-the-century Italian literature and culture; 20th-century Italian poetry; psychoanalysis applied to the humanities.

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Dr Ian Cooper: Lecturer in German

German Idealist and post-Idealist philosophy and the German lyric tradition; comparative approaches to German and English poetry.

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Dr Ian Cooper: Lecturer in German

German Idealist and post-Idealist philosophy and the German lyric tradition, comparative approaches to German and English poetry.

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Dr David Hornsby: Senior Lecturer in French and Linguistics

The history of the French language; sociolinguistics of French; sociolinguistic theory.

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Dr Heide Kunzelmann: Lecturer in German

H C Artmann, the avante garde, Austrian literature and culture, narrative theory (instability/the protean).

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Dr Alexander Marlow-Mann: Lecturer in Italian

Italian cinema, modern Italian culture and translation.

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Dr Alvise Sforza Tarabochia: Lecturer in Italian

Italian biopolitical thought; Italian mental health care; medical humanities in Italian studies.

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Professor Nuria Triana-Toribio: Professor of Hispanic Studies

Contemporary Hispanic film cultures; film legislation; film criticism; film festivals; new strategies of auteurism.

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Professor Nuria Triana-Toribio: Professor of Hispanic Studies

Contemporary Hispanic film cultures; film legislation; film criticism; film festivals; new strategies of auteurism, particularly in relation to transnational financing, production and dissemination strategies.

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Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources

Contacts

Admissions enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

E:information@kent.ac.uk

Subject enquiries

Postgraduate Office, School of European Culture and Languages

T: +44 (0)1227 816119

E: seclpgadmin@kent.ac.uk

School website

Open days

We hold regular Open Events at our Canterbury and Medway campuses. You will be able to talk to specialist academics and admissions staff, find out about our competitive fees, discuss funding opportunities and tour the campuses.

You can also discuss the programmes we run at our specialist centres in Brussels, Athens, Rome and Paris at the Canterbury Open Events. If you can't attend but would like to find out more you can come for an informal visit, contact our information team or find out more on our website.  

Please check which of our locations offers the courses you are interested in before choosing which event to attend.

 

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department for Education or Research Council UK) permitted increases are normally inflationary and the University therefore reserves the right to increase tuition fees by inflation (RPI excluding mortgage interest payments) as permitted by law or Government policy in the second and subsequent years of your course. If we intend to exercise this right to increase tuition fees, we will let you know by the end of June in the academic year before the one in which we intend to exercise that right.

If, in the future, the increases to regulated fees permitted by law or Government policy exceed the rate of inflation, we reserve the right to increase fees to the maximum permitted level. If we intend to exercise this extended right to increase tuition fees, we will let you know by the end of June in the academic year before the one in which we intend to exercise that right.

 

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Last Updated: 11/05/2016