Portrait of Dr Gloria Chamorro

Dr Gloria Chamorro

Lecturer in Applied Linguistics

About

Dr Gloria Chamorro obtained her PhD in Developmental Linguistics from the University of Edinburgh in 2013 and her MA in Linguistics and TESOL from Syracuse University, New York, in 2009. Her PhD research focused on first language attrition and its effects in the processing and interpretation of structures at the syntax/pragmatics interface in Spanish near-native speakers of English. 

Apart from first language attrition, Gloria's research interests also include second language acquisition and processing, and bilingualism across the lifespan, including bilingual education and its impact on children’s social and cognitive development.

Gloria is the project leader and coordinator of the English Hub for Refugees project, which she established in 2016 at the University of Kent to help unaccompanied refugee minors gain the English language skills they need to integrate into their new communities and access mainstream education.

Research interests

Gloria's research interests include second language acquisition, bilingualism and first language attrition, especially from a psycholinguistics perspective. 

Teaching

Gloria teaches undergraduate and postgraduate modules on second language acquisition, applied linguistics,​ language learning and teaching, and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages).

She is the Director of the MA in Applied Linguistics with TESOL.

Supervision

Ishrat Rehman: “Urdu phonology and its role in L2 teaching and perception” 

Zahra Bacha: “First language attrition among Algerian immigrants living in the UK for more than 20 years” 

Luke Allder, CHASE studentship recipient: “Using performing arts pedagogies to help young EAL learners”  

Professional

Gloria is the External Examiner for the Early Childhood and Education Department at the University of East London.

Publications

Article

  • Chamorro, G. (2018). Offline interpretation of subject pronouns by native speakers of Spanish. Glossa: a journal of general linguistics [Online] 3:27. Available at: https://doi.org/10.5334/gjgl.256.
    Research on anaphora resolution reveals that speakers’ interpretation of pronominal
    subjects is often inconsistent, with results differing in terms of the antecedent
    preferences of these speakers and the factors that affect these preferences. The
    present study investigates anaphora resolution by native speakers of Spanish using an
    offline judgment task where participants are presented with globally ambiguous
    anaphora to test the predictions of Carminati’s (2002) Position of Antecedent
    Strategy (PAS) with Spanish intra-sentential Main-Subordinate anaphora. The results
    show that native speakers of Iberian Spanish have a clear preference for the object as
    the antecedent for the overt pronoun with this structure, while a preference for the
    subject as the antecedent for the null pronoun was not revealed. These findings
    appear to be at odds with the PAS and suggest that anaphora resolution is affected by
    clause order.
  • Chamorro, G., Sturt, P. and Sorace, A. (2015). Selectivity in L1 Attrition: Differential Object Marking in Spanish Near-Native Speakers of English. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research [Online] 45:697-715. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1007/s10936-015-9372-4.
    Previous research has shown L1 attrition to be restricted to structures at the interfaces between syntax and pragmatics, but not to occur with syntactic properties that do not involve such interfaces (‘Interface Hypothesis’, Sorace and Filiaci in Anaphora resolution in near-native speakers of Italian. Second Lang Res 22: 339–368, 2006). The present study tested possible L1 attrition effects on a syntax-semantics interface structure [Differential Object Marking (DOM) using the Spanish personal preposition] as well as the effects of recent L1 re-exposure on the potential attrition of these structures, using offline and eye-tracking measures. Participants included a group of native Spanish speakers experiencing attrition (‘attriters’), a second group of attriters exposed exclusively to Spanish before they were tested, and a control group of Spanish monolinguals. The eye-tracking results showed very early sensitivity to DOM violations, which was of an equal magnitude across all groups. The off-line results also showed an equal sensitivity across groups. These results reveal that structures involving ‘internal’ interfaces like the DOM do not undergo attrition either at the processing or representational level.
  • Chamorro, G., Sorace, A. and Sturt, P. (2015). What is the Source of L1 Attrition? The Effect of Recent L1 Re-exposure on Spanish Speakers under L1 Attrition. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition [Online] 19:520-532. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1017/S1366728915000152.
    The recent hypothesis that L1 attrition affects the ability to process interface structures but not knowledge representations (Sorace, 2011) is tested by investigating the effects of recent L1 re-exposure on antecedent preferences for Spanish pronominal subjects, using offline judgements and online eye-tracking measures. Participants included a group of native Spanish speakers experiencing L1 attrition (‘attriters’), a second group of attriters exposed exclusively to Spanish before they were tested (‘re-exposed’), and a control group of Spanish monolinguals. The judgement data shows no significant differences between the groups. Moreover, the monolingual and re-exposed groups are not significantly different from each other in the eye-tracking data. The results of this novel manipulation indicate that attrition effects decrease due to L1 re-exposure, and that bilinguals are sensitive to input changes. Taken together, the findings suggest that attrition affects online sensitivity with interface structures rather than causing a permanent change in speakers’ L1 knowledge representations.

Book section

  • Chamorro, G. and Sorace, A. (2019). The Interface Hypothesis as a framework for studying L1 attrition. in: Köpke, B. and Schmid, M. S. eds. The Oxford Handbook of Language Attrition. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter focuses on first generation individual attrition from the point of view of the Interface Hypothesis (IH), which proposes that structures at the interface between syntax and other cognitive domains, such as pragmatics, are more likely to undergo attrition than structures that do not involve such an interface, and discusses recent research that provides evidence of the selectivity and reversibility of individual first language (L1) attrition. This research provides supporting evidence for the IH as it reveals that attrition affects structures at the syntax-pragmatics interface but not structures requiring the satisfaction of semantic conditions. This chapter also reviews research that supports Sorace’s (2011, 2016) proposal that individual L1 attrition affects only the ability to process interface structures but not knowledge representations, as it reveals that attrition only affects online sensitivity with structures at the syntax-pragmatics interface rather than causing a permanent change in speakers’ L1 knowledge representations.
  • Chamorro, G. (2014). The Effect of Recent L1 Exposure on Spanish Attrition: An Eye-Tracking Study. in: Orman, W. and Valleau, M. J. eds. Proceedings of the 38th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development. Cascadilla Press, pp. 77-89. Available at: http://www.cascadilla.com/bucld38toc.html.

Conference or workshop item

  • Kim, C. and Chamorro, G. (2018). Awareness of Linguistic Competence Influences Structural Priming. in: Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing.. Available at: https://amor.cms.hu-berlin.de/~knoeferp/AMLaP2018/Program_files/AMLaP2018_proceedings.pdf.
  • Chamorro, G., Sorace, A. and Sturt, P. (2016). Individual L1 attrition: Permanent or temporary changes in speakers’ native language? in: Third international conference on Language Attrition (ICLA 3).. Available at: https://languageattrition.org/icla3/.
  • Chamorro, G., Sturt, P. and Sorace, A. (2016). Does native language attrition affect processing abilities or knowledge representations? in: L2 Grammar Acquisition: New Research on Processing Instruction, Input Manipulation and Teaching Implications.. Available at: https://slaconf.wordpress.com/.
  • Chamorro, G. (2012). Selectivity of L1 attrition and effect of L1 exposure in Spanish near-native speakers of English: An eye-tracking study. in: Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing.. Available at: http://events.unitn.it/en/amlap2012.

Review

  • Chamorro, G. (2017). Book Review: Fred Genesee and Audrey Delcenserie (Eds.), Starting Over – The Language Development in Internationally-Adopted Children. First Language [Online]:1-3. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0142723717712800.
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