Classical & Archaeological Studies

Ancient History - BA (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

The great strength of Ancient History is that it allows you to specialise in the study of the ancient civilisations of Egypt, Persia, Greece and Rome that lie at the very heart of European culture and the cultures that border the Mediterranean.

At Kent, you can study the history of these ancient civilisations inside one programme, or you can follow a broader pathway that engages the study of history with that of ancient literature or archaeology.

You also have the opportunity to learn Latin or Ancient Greek, which are taught at beginners, intermediate and advanced level. Much of European civilisation grew out of the classical world so it is not surprising that it is still highly relevant today. 

Canterbury, as a late Iron Age settlement, a Romano-British city, an Anglo-Saxon town, and a centre of early Christianity, is an excellent base for studying different cultures, with visits to local sites and museums as well as to museums in London and Paris. There are also opportunities for archaeological fieldwork both locally and further afield.

This programme includes the opportunity to spend a year abroad, between Stages 2 and 3.

Independent rankings

Classics and Ancient History at Kent was ranked 7th overall in The Guardian University Guide 2017 and 9th for student satisfaction in The Complete University Guide 2017. In the National Student Survey 2016, 87% of our Classics students were satisfied with the quality of teaching.

Classics and Archaeology students who graduated from Kent in 2015 were the most successful in the UK at finding work or further study opportunities (DLHE).

 

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  

On most programmes, you study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also be able to take 'wild' modules from other programmes so you can customise your programme and explore other subjects that interest you.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

CL353 - The Civilisations of Greece and Rome (30 credits)

The history will centre on Athens in the 5th century B.C. We begin with Solon's reforms, then after considering the period of the Persian invasions we study the developed democracy with its empire under Pericles and its destruction in the Peloponnesian War. After 5 weeks, we move to the literature of the period, more specifically, the development of tragedy and comedy in fifth-century Athens, examining staging and dramatic conventions such as the role of actor, chorus and religious function and plot, especially the handling of mythological themes. We will analyse a selection of major plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes. Within this framework the module explores the role of tragedy and comedy as vehicles for public debate in the democracy, and its treatment of justice, religion, rationalism and patriotic themes.

In the Roman part of the course we shall treat the last century of the republic. Our focus will be on how that republic fell and was replaced by the empire whose founder was Augustus. Among the themes examined will be political violence, the intrusion of the army into political life and the rise of the warlord. In the literature part of the Spring term the module is concerned with the patronage of the arts (poetry, history writing, art and architecture) under Augustus, with the role of the arts as propaganda, and the thesis that writers were recruited to act as spokesmen for the policies and ideals of the principate. The central theme is the creation of enduring images of Rome and Empire, using traditional historical and mythological materials; alongside this the module treats areas of public policy such as moral legislation, festivals, religious reform and the position of women. The module is also concerned with the responses of the writers, whether as supporters of public policy, or as commenting on and reacting against it. Thus, its content is much better understood as a result of the historical development outlined in the first part of term.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL311 - Latin for Beginners (30 credits)

The aim of the module is to give students a firm foundation in Classical Latin, both vocabulary and grammar (accidence and syntax), using a modern course devised precisely with that objective in mind.



The schedule will follow the structured approach of Wheelock’s Latin, covering: verbs: all four conjugations, indicative (both active and passive), present infinitive and imperative active; nouns, all five declensions, singular and plural, pronouns, demonstratives, relatives; adjectives, prepositions, the uses of the cases, simple sentence construction.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL315 - Classical Mythology:Themes and Approaches (30 credits)

This module is intended to provide a general introduction to myth in the Ancient World and the nature of subsequent responses to it. Scholarship on approaches to mythology, as well as reception studies (if desired), will inform the analysis of myth in both its ancient and modern setting.



In the first term the aim is to introduce students to a working repertoire of a large span of ancient (e.g. Greek) mythology and to its meanings and functions within its original context. A selection of case-study myths (represented in literature and/or iconography) will be used to examine the potential meanings and social functions of myth in general. In the second term, subsequent responses to these myths will be explored; this might include, for example, the use of Greek myths in the Hellenistic, Roman and/or the modern period, and could include appropriations of myths across a range of media.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL354 - Roman Emperors and Biography (15 credits)

Today most adults have a conception of the lives of Roman emperors derived from TV or film. Few can discuss how the nature of ancient biography shapes the way in which the modern conception of the Roman emperor. Biography was a genre developed under the Roman Empire, most notably by Suetonius. This can be seen as a response to the presence of the Emperor (or Princeps), but is also the genre which created a cultural memory that was shot through with the morals associated with good and bad; virtue and vice. Few dead emperors were ever seen a paradigms for the virtuous life; whereas the living ones provided moral exemplars. The module is designed to unpick our modern image of the emperors to reveal how this literary genre from antiquity constructs our image of the past. The module will focus mainly on the author Suetonius, but will also include Tacitus' Agricola.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL358 - Words are Weapons: Insults in Classical Literature (15 credits)

Whether cruel or funny, hostile speech has a pervasive presence in the wealth of textual evidence from classical antiquity. Insulting communications, both formal and informal, reveal social values in an unusually succinct way, while their dependence on situation and context presents complex interpretative challenges.

In this module, insults form the basis for a wide-ranging investigation of classical literature inviting comparison of their literary treatment in different works and/or genres. The module is designed to accommodate various selections of material, which may include Greek literature, Roman literature, or a combination of both. It provides a variety of examples of invective to show the diversity of classical literature and, through the analysis of these examples, raise current debates in classical literary studies. So, for example, the insults found in Catullus may be used to explore the issue of authorial persona and 'sincerity'. Topics covered may include obscenity, debate and competition, laws governing slander and treason, the aesthetics of beauty and ugliness, construction of social categorisations (gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and status), and the conventions of specific genres.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL359 - Beginner's Greek 1 (15 credits)

This course is designed for students who have not been exposed to any other highly inflected language. It aims at teaching students to read and understand ancient Greek, by providing them with knowledge of ancient Greek grammar and syntax. Grammatical theory is taught as a tool for dealing with the texts, understanding and gradually translating them.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL360 - Beginner's Greek 2 (15 credits)

This course is designed for students who have had some exposure to a highly inflected language. It aims at teaching students to read and understand ancient Greek, by providing them with knowledge of ancient Greek grammar and syntax. Grammatical theory is taught as a tool for dealing with the texts, understanding and gradually translating them. Students will gain sufficient understanding of Greek grammar and syntax to enable them to translate Greek prose and verse. In addition, the study of ancient Greek will enrich the students' vocabulary.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

CL584 - History of the Roman Empire from Trajan to Constantine (15 credits)

This module examines in detail the history of the Roman Empire from the commencement of the principate of Trajan in AD97to the conversion of the Emperor Constantine I in AD 312, and provides both a survey of a major period of Roman imperial history and an opportunity to study in greater depth the administrative, social, economic and religious developments of this period. Students will read widely in the ancient sources, historical, literary and documentary, and will be introduced to the inscriptional evidence for imperial history. The module forms a key element in the sequence of survey courses on Roman history and has links with Christianity in the Roman World and Roman Britain. This module will concentrate on the main administrative, social, economic and religious developments throughout the period rather than on the details of political and military history.

Students will read widely in the major ancient sources, including Pliny, Suetonius and the

Scriptores Historiae Augustae, and will be introduced to the inscriptional and documentary

evidence for imperial history

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL659 - Barbarians in the West (30 credits)

How did the Western Roman Empire undergo its transformation into the early medieval world? This course provides an overview of the period between 400 and 600 A.D., in particular, examining the collision between barbarian and Roman in late Antiquity and the development of the post-Roman and early medieval West, focusing on changes in culture and society through a critical evaluation of evidence from history, art, architecture and archaeology. There will be a focus on Italy, France and Britain which is intended to 1) provide a manageable and structured course at an appropriate level of detail, with the potential for some depth of analysis, and 2) concentrate on those geographical areas which mesh closely with the subject matter of other courses in Roman archaeology and late Antique and medieval history offered by colleagues in the Classical and Archaeological Studies and History departments.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL665 - Constantinople and the Late Antique City (30 credits)

This course will survey the evolution of the Mediterranean city from AD 300 to 650, the urban crisis which followed, and the direction which urban life took thereafter. City life in this period was until recently poorly understood, hindered by the prejudices of classical archaeologists, who removed late levels without record, and the selective interests of Christian archaeologists who concentrated on churches. Now new archaeological fieldwork has revealed much greater complexity, from urban collapse in the West to the flourishing cities of the 6th c. East, which provided a foundation for much of Early Islamic urbanism. Although north-west Europe is included, the main focus is the Mediterranean, where urban life was strongest, throughout the period. Lectures will explore both thematic and regional syntheses, with a major distinction drawn, not between a Greek East and a Latin West, but between a Mediterranean core and a northern periphery. An attempt will be made to link changes in the physical appearance of cities to wider events and processes: whether military, political, religious or economic in character. Seminars will explore aspects of the rich source material available, whether drawn from architectural remains, stratigraphic archaeology, epigraphy, or selected written sources of the period.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL677 - Fieldwork Practice (30 credits)

This module will provide a credit framework for fieldwork training undertaken on University of Kent training excavations, or approved partners, normally supported by a SECL archaeological fieldwork bursary, to assist with the costs involved in a participation of 15 working days. The module will permit three alternative pathways, in excavation, survey or museum studies. Assessment will be in the form of an illustrated portfolio featuring a description of the project and an account of each type of work undertaken by the student. Project directors will be provided with a checklist of fieldwork tasks to be completed, of which a minimum number will be mandatory. Students who have no prior experience of fieldwork will likely be accommodated on a project in the UK, whilst those who are experienced may be offered a place on an excavation abroad. Skills assessed will range from efficient manual digging and artefact washing to site / find drawing or photography and the completing of pro-forma record sheets.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL706 - The Rise and Fall of Athens (30 credits)

This module examines, in detail, Greek history from the end of the Persian invasions to the fall of Athens in 404 BC. The main themes of the module are the rise and fall of the power of Athens, the Peloponnesian War and the role of the Persian Empire in Greek history in the 5th century BC. Particular attention will be paid to the causes of the conflict between Athens and Sparta and to the political and military history of the last three decades of the 5th century BC.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL608 - Greek Art and Architecture (30 credits)

This module is designed to give students a thorough introduction to a well-studied aspect of Greek archaeology, that of its Art and Architecture. The class will begin with examinations into the Greek Bronze Age by looking at Minoan and Mycenaean archaeology, followed by the art and architecture of the Iron Age. It will then focus on the archaeology of the Archaic, Classical (early to late) and culminate with the Hellenistic periods. The main areas of Greek occupation will be studied: mainland Greece, the Greek Islands, Asia Minor, Southern Italy and Sicily, with concentration on major sites such as the Athenian Acropolis and Agora, Corinth, Ephesus and Syracuse.. Religion is important for an understanding of the Greek world, so sanctuaries such as the sites of Delphi and Olympia will be explored and juxtaposed with smaller ones like Brauron and Sounion. Throughout the class, the styles, development and changes to the art and architecture will be studied, but also questions will be raised about the cultural view of the remains This is important for understanding the role the sites and artistic work played in Greek societies. Moreover, the historical events of specific periods will be explored to see what significance and influence they played on artistic and architectural styles, as well as patronage. The class will, therefore, supply students with a thorough grounding in the multiple issues raised by the study of Greek art and architecture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL609 - Roman Art and Architecture (30 credits)

The course provides an introduction to the study of Roman art and architecture, including the close interpretation of works of art and buildings, and an investigation of the role of art and architecture within the wider Roman world. The geographical area covered will include both Rome and Italy, and provincial Roman sites and material. Aspects to be examined include context, dating, technique, styles and subject matter, and ideology including the role played by art in Roman society. Arranged broadly in chronological order, from the Republican to the late Roman period, the course gives an overview of the varied media and techniques used in Roman art and architecture and the changes in art style that occurred throughout the Roman period.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL715 - Early Greek Prose in the Original (15 credits)

Students will participate in the close reading and interpretation of Greek prose texts. Translation of the text(s) from the original will enhance understanding of its construction by the author(s) and invite reflection on the use of stylistic and linguistic features (and their effect). This understanding may be further developed through the study of the literary and cultural context within which the text was produced.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL717 - Early Greek Verse in the Original (15 credits)

Students will participate in the close reading and interpretation of Greek verse texts. Translation of the text(s) from the original will enhance understanding of its construction by the author(s) and invite reflection on the use of stylistic and linguistic features (and their effect). This understanding may be further developed through the study of the literary and cultural context within which the text was produced.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL723 - Early Latin Prose in the Original (15 credits)

Students will participate in the close reading and interpretation of Latin prose texts. Translation of the text(s) from the original will enhance understanding of its construction by the author(s) and invite reflection on the use of stylistic and linguistic features (and their effect). This understanding may be further developed through the study of the literary and cultural context within which the text was produced.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL725 - Early Latin Verse in the Original (15 credits)

Students will participate in the close reading and interpretation of Latin verse texts. Translation of the text(s) from the original will enhance understanding of its construction by the author(s) and invite reflection on the use of stylistic and linguistic features (and their effect). This understanding may be further developed through the study of the literary and cultural context within which the text was produced.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL732 - War and Imperialism in Ancient Rome c.350-100 BC (15 credits)

This module examines in detail the history of the Roman Republic from 350 BC through to 100 BC, and provides both a survey of a major period of Roman history and an opportunity to study in greater depth the political, social, and economic consequences of the development of Rome's imperial ambitions in the Mediterranean. Students will read widely in the ancient sources, historical, literary and documentary.

Students will read widely from a range of works including: Polybius, Plutarch, Livy, Appian, Cicero, and Sallust.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Year abroad

Going abroad as part of your degree is an amazing experience and a chance to develop personally, academically and professionally.  You experience a different culture, gain a new academic perspective, establish international contacts and enhance your employability.

You can apply to add a Year Abroad to your degree programme from your arrival at Kent until the autumn term of your second year.  The Year Abroad takes place between Stages 2 and 3 at one of our partner universities.  Places and destination are subject to availability, language and degree programme.  For a full list, please see Go Abroad.

You are expected to adhere to any academic progression requirements in Stages 1 and 2 to proceed to the Year Abroad.  The Year Abroad is assessed on a pass/fail basis and will not count towards your final degree classification.


Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

CL6001 - Dissertation (60 credits)

This module is intended to introduce undergraduate students to research. As such it provides an opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing, in either archaeology, history or ancient literature. Originality and feasibility are important aspects of writing dissertations, and to avoid problems topics will be scrutinised and approved by CLAS before research can begin. Students can expect guidance from the module convenor and an academic supervisor throughout the process, varying from one-to-one tutorials to classes on how to edit your own prose. There will also be a meeting regarding the Dissertation at the end of the Spring term of the previous year to clarify arrangements and to outline what work is required on this module.

The programme document with regulations is sent to all students at the end of spring term of Stage 2. Students are invited to suggest titles for comment, for which tutors are allocated. They are advised to do preliminary reading over the summer based on generic advice of the module convenor. They then choose precise topics in consultation with the convenor and personal tutors at the start of the autumn term.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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CL6002 - Extended Essay (30 credits)

This module addresses one of the fundamental aims of the programme, to familiarise students with the techniques of independent study and practice methodological skills they have acquired/are acquiring in their other modules. Essays may be written on any suitable subject, subject to approval by the convenor, and the module can be linked with any of the modules in the programme. Choices will be informed by the student's personal interests, the fulfilment of the aims of the module, the availability of expert supervision, and the accessibility of relevant material.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL591 - Barbarians in the West (30 credits)

How did the Western Roman Empire undergo its transformation into the early medieval world? This course provides an overview of the period between 400 and 600 A.D., in particular, examining the collision between barbarian and Roman in late Antiquity and the development of the post-Roman and early medieval West, focusing on changes in culture and society through a critical evaluation of evidence from history, art, architecture and archaeology. There will be a focus on Italy, France and Britain which is intended to 1) provide a manageable and structured course at an appropriate level of detail, with the potential for some depth of analysis, and 2) concentrate on those geographical areas which mesh closely with the subject matter of other courses in Roman archaeology and late Antique and medieval history offered by colleagues in the Classical and Archaeological Studies and History departments.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

Read more

CL707 - The Rise and Fall of Athens (30 credits)

This module examines, in detail, Greek history from the end of the Persian invasions to the fall of Athens in 404 BC. The main themes of the module are the rise and fall of the power of Athens, the Peloponnesian War and the role of the Persian Empire in Greek history in the 5th century BC. Particular attention will be paid to the causes of the conflict between Athens and Sparta and to the political and military history of the last three decades of the 5th century BC.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

Read more

CL733 - War and Imperialism in AncientRome c.350-100 BC (15 credits)

This module examines in detail the history of the Roman Republic from 350 BC through to 100 BC, and provides both a survey of a major period of Roman history and an opportunity to study in greater depth the political, social, and economic consequences of the development of Rome's imperial ambitions in the Mediterranean. Students will read widely in the ancient sources, historical, literary and documentary.

Students will read widely from a range of works including: Polybius, Plutarch, Livy, Appian, Cicero, and Sallust.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

Read more

CL726 - Early Latin Verse in the Original (15 credits)

Students will participate in the close reading and interpretation of Latin verse texts. Translation of the text(s) from the original will enhance understanding of its construction by the author(s) and invite reflection on the use of stylistic and linguistic features (and their effect). This understanding may be further developed through the study of the literary and cultural context within which the text was produced.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CL731 - Classical Studies and Ancient History in the Classroom (30 credits)

This module gives students the opportunity to apply the knowledge they have obtained in their Classical and Archaeological Degree to a work-place situation. It will enhance the student experience and allow them to take responsibility for their learning and development. In addition, it will give the students work experience which enhances their employability and improves their CV.

The students will spend two hours per week in seminar learning about pedagogic processes, including: learning from experience as a student, developing good teaching practice, theories of learning and teaching; the use of different teaching materials including technology; lesson planning and development of personal style; assessment criteria and feedback techniques; communication and motivational skills; self and peer evaluation.

They will also spend one half-day per week for ten weeks in a primary or secondary school. They will observe sessions taught by their designated teacher and possibly other teachers. Later they will act somewhat in the role of a teaching assistant, working with small groups, and delivering material relevant to the programme. They will keep a weekly online journal reflecting on their activities at their designated school. The university sessions and weekly school work will complement each other. Therefore, attendance to university sessions is crucial as it will also give the students the opportunity to discuss aspects related to their weekly placement and to receive guidance.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CL718 - Early Greek Verse in the Original (15 credits)

Students will participate in the close reading and interpretation of Greek verse texts. Translation of the text(s) from the original will enhance understanding of its construction by the author(s) and invite reflection on the use of stylistic and linguistic features (and their effect). This understanding may be further developed through the study of the literary and cultural context within which the text was produced.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

Read more

CL716 - Early Greek Prose in the Original (15 credits)

Students will participate in the close reading and interpretation of Greek prose texts. Translation of the text(s) from the original will enhance understanding of its construction by the author(s) and invite reflection on the use of stylistic and linguistic features (and their effect). This understanding may be further developed through the study of the literary and cultural context within which the text was produced.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

Read more

CL639 - Constantinople and the late Antique City (30 credits)

This course will survey the evolution of the Mediterranean city from AD 300 to 650, the urban crisis which followed, and the direction which urban life took thereafter. City life in this period was until recently poorly understood, hindered by the prejudices of classical archaeologists, who removed late levels without record, and the selective interests of Christian archaeologists who concentrated on churches. Now new archaeological fieldwork has revealed much greater complexity, from urban collapse in the West to the flourishing cities of the 6th c. East, which provided a foundation for much of Early Islamic urbanism. Although north-west Europe is included, the main focus is the Mediterranean, where urban life was strongest, throughout the period. Lectures will explore both thematic and regional syntheses, with a major distinction drawn, not between a Greek East and a Latin West, but between a Mediterranean core and a northern periphery. An attempt will be made to link changes in the physical appearance of cities to wider events and processes: whether military, political, religious or economic in character. Seminars will explore aspects of the rich source material available, whether drawn from architectural remains, stratigraphic archaeology, epigraphy, or selected written sources of the period.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage

Teaching & Assessment

All modules have a weekly small-group seminar, and most also have weekly lectures. We encourage you to take part in excavations and field surveys with staff and associated institutions, and student bursaries are available to support this.

Assessment at all stages varies from 100% coursework to a combination of examination and coursework.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • teach a congruent discipline within the framework of the European intellectual, cultural and historical traditions, interacting with other component disciplines
  • treat the diverse societies and cultures of the Ancient World and their interaction, with a focus on history, but with the possibility of the inclusion of literature and archaeology
  • study the history of ancient Greece and Rome, and the contemporary civilizations of ancient Asia Minor, Persia and Egypt, from ca.600BC to ca.AD600
  • survey the main areas and genres of Classical Literature, both Greek and Latin
  • make a study in depth of selected themes, regions and periods in history
  • introduce key elements by which early Europe acquired its social, political, cultural and intellectual foundations
  • explore different types of evidence: literary, historical, art-historical and archaeological, using primary source material wherever possible and focusing of different approaches and techniques
  • examine the problems of interpretation in each type of source material through critical analysis of current studies
  • equip students with a range of subject-based critical thinking and communication skills
  • provide learning opportunities that are enjoyable, involve realistic workloads and offer appropriate support for students from a diverse range of backgrounds.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • another culture, whether focused on literature, thought, art and religion, or on history and political and social organisation, or on material culture, with an informed sense of the similarities and differences between it and our own culture
  • complementary subjects (literary, philosophical, historical, art historical and archaeological)
  • selected themes, periods and regions within ancient history in the context of current debate
  • an appropriate and diverse range of primary materials and of the appropriate methods of interpretation.

Intellectual skills

You gain the following intellectual abilities:

  • apply the skills needed for academic study and enquiry
  • analyse, evaluate and interpret a variety of types of evidence in an independent and critical manner
  • select, gather and synthesise relevant information from a wide variety of sources to gain a coherent understanding
  • deploy a range of techniques and methodologies of study
  • use problem solving skills
  • evaluate research in a critical manner
  • study and reach conclusions independently.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in the following:

  • the ability to make a critical evaluation of a variety of sources for literary and historical and as appropriate archaeological study
  • the ability to extract key elements from complex data and identify and solve associated problems
  • select and apply appropriate methodologies in assessing data, such as bibliographical research, textual analysis, historical analysis, visual skills, collection and analysis of archaeological data, use of statistics, philosophical argument and analysis
  • gather, memorise and deploy evidence and information, and show awareness of the consequences of the unavailability of evidence
  • show familiarity with the basic concepts which underpin the different branches of the programme pathways
  • marshal argument lucidly and communicate interpretations using the appropriate academic conventions.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in the following:

  • the ability to communicate effectively with a wide range of individuals using a variety of means
  • take responsibility for your personal and professional learning and development
  • evaluate and learn from your own academic performance
  • manage time and prioritise workloads and assessments, and write and think under pressure
  • use problem-solving skills in a variety of theoretical and practical situations
  • work creatively, flexibly and adaptably with others, and understand how groups function
  • deploy a range of IT skills effectively, such as producing word-processed text with footnotes, basic formatting, using email, research using databases and text files, locating and exploiting websites.

KIS Course data

UNISTATS / KIS

Key Information Sets

The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. 

Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications. Typical requirements are listed below. Students offering alternative qualifications should contact us for further advice. 

It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

New GCSE grades

If you've taken exams under the new GCSE grading system, please see our conversion table to convert your GCSE grades.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

BBB 

Access to HE Diploma

The University will not necessarily make conditional offers to all Access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. 

If we make you an offer, you will need to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF; OCR) on a case-by-case basis. Please contact us for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall or 15 at HL

International students

The University welcomes applications from international students. Our international recruitment team can guide you on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about entry requirements for your country.

If you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes.

Meet our staff in your country

For more advice about applying to Kent, you can meet our staff at a range of international events.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of 'pre-sessional' courses in English for Academic Purposes. You attend these courses before starting your degree programme. 

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Careers

Classics and Archaeology students who graduated from Kent in 2015 were the most successful in the UK at finding work or further study opportunities (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey).

Possible careers include archaeology, the heritage industry, museums, business, journalism, Civil Service, computing, media, librarianship, teaching, further academic study, and any employment requiring literacy and versatility.

Funding

University funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. See our funding page for more details. 

Government funding

You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

Scholarships

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. 

For 2018/19 entry, the scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications (including BTEC and IB) as specified on our scholarships pages

The scholarship is also extended to those who achieve AAB at A level (or specified equivalents) where one of the subjects is either Mathematics or a Modern Foreign Language. Please review the eligibility criteria.

Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources



Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Open days

Our general open days will give you a flavour of what it is like to be an undergraduate, postgraduate or part-time student at Kent. They include a programme of talks for undergraduate students, with subject lectures and demonstrations, plus self-guided walking tours of the campus and accommodation.

Please check which of our locations offers the courses you are interested in before choosing which event to attend.

 

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department for Education or Research Council UK) permitted increases are normally inflationary and the University therefore reserves the right to increase tuition fees by inflation (RPI excluding mortgage interest payments) as permitted by law or Government policy in the second and subsequent years of your course. If we intend to exercise this right to increase tuition fees, we will let you know by the end of June in the academic year before the one in which we intend to exercise that right.

If, in the future, the increases to regulated fees permitted by law or Government policy exceed the rate of inflation, we reserve the right to increase fees to the maximum permitted level. If we intend to exercise this extended right to increase tuition fees, we will let you know by the end of June in the academic year before the one in which we intend to exercise that right.

 

Classical & Archaeological Studies, School of European Culture and Languages, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NF

Enquiries: +44 (0)1227 827159 or contact Classical & Archaeological Studies

Last Updated: 02/06/2014