Portrait of Shona Illingworth

Shona Illingworth

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About

Shona Illingworth is an artist filmmaker whose major works take the form of immersive gallery based multi-screen video and multi-channel sound installation. Her work combines interdisciplinary research (particularly with emerging neuropsychological models of memory and amnesia, critical approaches to memory studies, media sociology and human rights law) with socially engaged practice.

Her work has been exhibited internationally, with shows at the Imperial War Museum, London; Museum of Modern Art, Bologna; FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology), Liverpool; UNSW Galleries, Sydney and the Wellcome Collection, London. She has received commissions from Film and Video Umbrella, Hayward Gallery, London, and Channel 4 Television. Upcoming solo exhibitions include the Bahrain National Museum 2020 and The Power Plant, Toronto, 2021. Shona was shortlisted for the 2016 Jarman Award and is an Imperial War Museum Associate, Trustee of Project Art Works and sits on the editorial board of Digital War (digital-war.org).

Research interests

Shona’s research practice involves diagrammatic and spatial sound drawing, conceptual map making, composition of densely layered sound and moving image, and convening interdisciplinary forums and symposia. Her current work includes the development of a major new immersive multi-screen video and multi-channel sound installation, Topologies of Air, commissioned by The Wapping Project, which examines the impact of accelerating geopolitical, technological and environmental change on the composition, nature and use/exploitation of airspace. 

Shona is also working in collaboration Professor Nick Grief (Kent Law School) to establish the Airspace Tribunal (http://airspacetribunal.org), an international public forum that brings together diverse expertise and experience to consider the case for and against a proposed new human right: to protect the freedom to exist without physical or psychological threat from above. The Airspace Tribunal is part of and contributes to the development of Topologies of Air. The inaugural hearing of the Airspace Tribunal took place at Doughty Street Chambers, London on 21 September 2018, and the next hearing will take place at the Ethics Centre in Sydney, on 14 October 2019 as part of the Big Anxiety Festival (https://www.thebiganxiety.org/events/shona-illngworth/). Further hearings are planned for Copenhagen and Hiroshima.

Previous works include Lesions in the Landscape (2015), made in dialogue with Claire, a woman who can no longer access much of her past or form new memories, and leading neuropsychologists Professor Martin A. Conway and Professor Catherine Loveday. Supported by a Large Arts Award from the Wellcome Trust, this project reflects on Claire’s experience of amnesia, interweaving this with an exploration of the depopulated island of St Kilda, a remote archipelago located in the North Atlantic, to explore the complex individual and societal impact of amnesia and cultural erasure.

Teaching

Shona teaches across film, media and arts practices.

Supervision

Shona is particularly interested in supervising practice based PhDs across artist and experimental film, the politics of cultural production and interdisciplinary research.

Publications

Showing 50 of 68 total publications in the Kent Academic Repository. View all publications.

Article

  • Grief, N., Illingworth, S., Hoskins, A. and Conway, M. (2018). The Airspace Tribunal: Towards a New Human Right to Protect the Freedom to Exist Without Physical or Psychological Threat from Above. European Human Rights Law Review:201-207.

Book

  • Illingworth, S. and Conway, M. (2011). Shona Illingworth - The Watch Man. Balnakiel. [Online]. London, UK: Film and Video Umbrella. Available at: http://www.fvu.co.uk/bookshop/details/the-watch-man-balnakiel/.
    This richly illustrated book profiles two significant bodies of artwork: The Watch Man and Balnakiel, by Shona Illingworth through images of her work, specially written art/text works by the artist, extracts from her ongoing dialogue with Professor Martin A. Conway and a series of diagrammatic drawings that emerge from their interdisciplinary research process. The Watch Man and Balnakiel are studies of memory, history and place that examine the damage that is done to the psyche by the experience of war and the equally pervasive and insidious marks that have been left on the physical landscape by the presence of the military. Informed by an ongoing dialogue between Illingworth and Conway, these artworks extend an exploration of the relevance of scientific insight into spatial understandings of memory to current thinking about geopolitics, contemporary fears, how collective memory forms across cultural and social difference, and how our sense of physical and temporal location is formed. This is further elaborated by three specially commissioned essays on Illingworth’s work by leading academics and art writers in the field, which develop new thinking about memory and its articulation in moving image and sound through a close examination of these artworks. Additional artworks represented in the book have been developed by the artist through interdisciplinary discussion with specialists such as Dr Anson Mackay, Reader in Environmental Change, University College London and Dr Jason Franks, Research Fellow, Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of St Andrews. Funded by the Arts Council England and an Arts Award from the Wellcome Trust.

Composition

  • Illingworth, S. (2014). Sonification of Amnesic Memory. [Multi-channel sound installation].
    The Sonification of Amnesic Memory is a multi-channel sound installation and Sensecam image work that was presented at the Amnesia Lab symposium, 23–25 September 2014 at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney and exhibited in the Amnesia Lab exhibition at UNSW Galleries, Sydney, 20 September to 8 November 2014. The sound installation uses data from an electroencephalogram (EEG) study of a woman with amnesia viewing images she has taken using SenseCam. The study was run by neuropsychologist Catherine Loveday (Westminster University) and psychologist Corinna Haenschel (City University) at the EEG Lab at City University as research-in-progress for Lesions in the Landscape: Claire and the Island of Hirta, a project led by Shona Illingworth and funded by the Wellcome Trust, UK. The EEG data was then sonified to create a multi-channel sound installation as part of a wider body of work which sets out to develop new forms of expression for and ways to depict the neurological landscape of amnesia and the sudden bursts of neural activity in the brain during Proustian moments of recollection cued by Sensecam images. Sensecam is a sensory operated camera that produces images which have been shown to activate otherwise inaccessible memory in some cases of amnesia. EEG measures the electrical activity of the brain, via electrodes applied to the scalp. Working with Charlie Fleming (University of Kent), the waveforms of neural firing output from the EEG were transformed into sound – the 32 channels corresponding to 64 electrodes placed on key parts of the scalp. A muliti-speaker array was installed in the gallery, the position of the of 32 speakers corresponding with the relative positions of the EEG electrodes, in order to re-present the EEG data and to map the real time memory construction process of someone with amnesia in spatialised audio form. The sound installation created a new possibilities for the articulation of amnesia and EEG data, opening up new avenues for research in the study of amnesia, across cognitive neuropsychology and fine art practice.

Conference or workshop item

  • Illingworth, S. (2014). 216 Westbound - panel discussion. In: Anxious Places Angst, Environments and Affective Contamination. Available at: http://events.arts.ac.uk/apex/EventFormPage?id=a0RD000000ACi96MAD&book=true.
    Presentation of research in progress for the film 216 Westbound by Shona Illingworth and panel discussion on the themes in the work with Professor John Tulloch and Professor Andrew Hoskins, Anxious Places symposium. The symposium examined the ways in which anxiety ‘contaminates’ urban and social environments. Artists and scholars discussed contemporary angst from a range of cross-disciplinary perspectives and artistic medium.
  • Illingworth, S. (2014). Amnesia Forum, Prosthetic Memory: Prosthetic Interference. In: Amnesia Forum, Prosthetic Memory: Prosthetic Interference.
    The Amnesia Forums are conceived and organised by Shona Illingworth. They are a series of cross-discipline academic roundtable discussions for artists, scientists, geographers, historians, writers and researchers to explore key directions and debates surrounding current scientific insight into memory and amnesia, and contemporary discourse around the themes of individual and cultural amnesia and evolving constructions of place, location and identity. Each forum centres on a set of research questions. The Amnesia Forums are research-in-progress for Lesions in the Landscape: Claire and the Island of Hirta, a project led by Illingworth and funded by the Wellcome Trust, UK. Ongoing research for Lesions in the Landscape is presented by Illingworth at each forum and research presentations are given by all invited participants. The Amnesia Forum, Prosthetic Memory: Prosthetic Interference was organised with Roger McKinley in partnership with FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology), Liverpool and centred on questions such as: How is embodied memory/perception integral to the functioning of a memory prosthesis? These questions related to four broad areas of focus: memory; technological interfaces; archive and prosthetic memory. Participants included: Shona Illingworth, University of Kent; Stephen Fairclough, Professor of Psychophysiology at Liverpool John Moores University; Michael Mulqueen, Professor of Media and Security Innovation at Liverpool John Moores University; Jill Bennett, Professor and Director of the National Institute for Experimental Arts, UNSW Australia; David Clegg, artist and creator of the Trebus Projects; Mike Stubbs, Director of FACT; Dr Caterina Albano, Reader and curator at Central Saint Martin’s College, University of the Arts London; Steven Bode, Director Film and Video Umbrella; Roger McKinley, Research and innovation Manager, FACT; Dr Sas, School of Computing and Communications, Lancaster University; Helen Pynor, artist; Laura Yates, Community Programmer, FACT; Dr Mark Wright, Director of the Research Centre for Creativity and Digital Embodiment, LJMU School of Art and Design, and Andrew Hoskins, Interdisciplinary Research Professor, University of Glasgow.
  • Illingworth, S. (2014). Uncertain Ground: Landscape, Memory and Theatres of Conflict. In: Uncertain Ground: Landscape, Memory and Theatres of Conflict. Available at: http://www.cca-glasgow.com/programme/52deb3c7d90549172000006a.
    A screening of Shona Illingworth’s film Balnakiel, with its exploration of the complex forces of military and cultural memory and history in northwest Scotland provided the stimulus for this symposium on the Scottish landscape and its historical and contemporary aesthetic and political resonance. This event, organised by Film and Video Umbrella and CCA, and supported by the Wellcome Trust, was part of Film and Video Umbrella’s 25 Frames programme, which staged 25 key artists’ moving-image works chosen from over 200 works commissioned by this leading arts organisation over the past 25 years. The symposium included: presentations by Shona Illingworth with Professor Martin A. Conway (City); Professor Catriona Mossison (Heriot Watt); Dr Issie MacPhail (UHI and Glasgow) and Professor Andrew Hoskins (Glasgow), and was chaired by Steven Bode, Director of Film and Video Umbrella.
  • Illingworth, S. (2014). Hirte: Three Forms of Forgetting. In: Place - Occupation. Available at: https://tickets.aldeburgh.co.uk/Online/default.asp?doWork::WScontent::loadArticle=Load&BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::article_id=D99E2E03-11BF-484D-ACB6-3CC5965A21B6.
    Presentation of research-in-progress for Lesions in the Landscape at the Place: Occupation, a two day conference curated by Gareth Evans with Aldeburgh Music. The conference programme presented a cross-arts exploration of the culture and meanings of landscape and a wide-ranging investigation into what it means to hold your ground and occupy a place and included presentations from: Philip Hoare, Jay Griffiths, Jem Finer, Patrick Keiller, Pat Collins, Sukhdev Sandhu, Lavinia Greenlaw, Paul Morley, Ken Worpole, Iain Sinclair and Andrea Zimmerman.
  • Illingworth, S. (2013). Amnesia Forum: Lesions in the Landscape 2. In: Lesions in the Landscape.
    The Amnesia Forums are conceived and organised by Shona Illingworth. They are a series of cross-discipline academic roundtable discussions for artists, scientists, geographers, historians, writers and researchers to explore key directions and debates surrounding current scientific insight into memory and amnesia, and contemporary discourse around the themes of individual and cultural amnesia and evolving constructions of place, location and identity. Each forum centres on a set of research questions. The Amnesia Forums are research-in-progress for Lesions in the Landscape: Claire and the Island of Hirta, a project led by Illingworth and funded by the Wellcome Trust, UK. Ongoing research for Lesions in the Landscape is presented by Illingworth at each forum and research presentations are given by all invited participants. The Amnesia Forum, Lesions in the Landscape was hosted by the Department of Psychology, City University and centred on questions such as: How does amnesia affect the capacity to imagine the future? and What affect does amnesia have on the shape of the social, cultural
    and physical landscapes we inhabit? Chair: Professor Martin A. Conway (City University); Participants included: Shona Illingworth, (University of Kent); Dr Catherine Loveday, (University of Westminster); Claire Robertson, project collaborator; Dr Caterina Albano, Reader and curator, Central Saint Martins College of Art; Jill Bennett, Professor and Director of the National Institute for Experimental Arts, UNSW Australia; Gareth Evans, writer, curator and the Film Curator, Whitechapel Gallery, London; Kate Forde, Senior Curator, The Wellcome Trust; Professor Anson W. Mackay (UCL); Roger McKinley, Research and Innovation Manager, FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology); and Jenny Paton, The Wellcome Trust.
  • Illingworth, S. (2013). Memory and conflict in Balnakiel, The Watch Man and Lesions in the Landscape. In: Memory, History and Conflict Conference. Available at: http://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_265338_en.pdf.
  • Illingworth, S. (2013). Working with Amnesia. In: Memory, Identity, Performance and Neuroscience - Part 1. Available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/smfa/research/news.html?view=528.
    Shona Illingworth discusses her collaboration with neuropsychologist, Catherine Loveday and research-in-progress for Lesions in the Landscape, a project led by Illingworth, with Martin A. Conway and Catheine Loveday, supported by the Wellcome Trust.
  • Illingworth, S. (2012). Ruination 2. In: Why the Recent Craze for Ruins?. Available at: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/english/eventrecords/archive/2012-13/research3.aspx.
    A seminar presentation and screening of Shona Illingworth's film Balnakiel in a seminar with Tim Edensor, which examined why scholarly, artistic and public interest in ruins and derelict spaces has intensified over the last decade. Organised by Professor Patrick Wright as part of his Seminar series Why the Recent Craze for Ruins? at Kings College, London.
  • Illingworth, S. (2012). Amnesia Forum: Lesions in the Landscape 1. In: Lesions in the Landscape 1.
    The Amnesia Forums are conceived and organised by Shona Illingworth. They are a series of cross-discipline academic roundtable discussions for artists, scientists, geographers, historians, writers and researchers to explore key directions and debates surrounding current scientific insight into memory and amnesia, and contemporary discourse around the themes of individual and cultural amnesia and evolving constructions of place, location and identity. Each forum centres on a set of research questions. The Amnesia Forums are research-in-progress for Lesions in the Landscape: Claire and the Island of Hirta, a project led by Illingworth and funded by the Wellcome Trust, UK. The Amnesia Forum, Lesions in the Landscape 1 was an open forum organised by Illingworth in conjunction with the Adam Smith Research Foundation: http://www.gla.ac.uk/researchinstitutes/adamsmith/ and the Glasgow Memory Group. Illingworth presented key research in progress: St Kilda (untitled) and 216 Westbound, presentatons were also given by invited speakers including Dr Issie MacPhail (UHI), Honorary Research Fellow at the Department of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow. The event focused on a series of questions including: Does the monumentalising effect of exhaustive processes of gathering, examining and archiving materials and evidence in relation to conflicted historical events conversely precipitate a form of cultural amnesia?
  • Illingworth, S. (2011). Memory / Sound / Image. In: Memory / Sound / Image. Available at: http://www.modernartoxford.org.uk/whats-on/half-day-symposium/about/.
    A symposium that focused on themes explored in THE WATCH MAN – BALNAKIEL, a book on Shona Illingworth’s work, published by Film and Video Umbrella, UK. The symposium included screenings of Illingworth’s films, Balnakiel and The Watch Man and presentations by: Illingworth; cognitive neuro-psychologist Professor Martin A. Conway, a leading expert on human memory; writer and curator Caterina Albano, and writer, curator and artist Alfredo Cramerotti and explored individual and cultural memory in relation to scientific insight and the politics of location and conflict. A video of the symposium was commissioned and presented online by Modern Art Oxford.
  • Illingworth, S. (2008). War and Memory. In: War and Memory.
    The 'Memory and War' forum was organised by Shona Illingworth and Kate Forde and took place on 17 December 2008 to coincide with the War and Medicine exhibition (22 November 2008-15 February 2009) at the Wellcome Collection, London. It was conceived by Illingworth as part on her ongoing series of interdisciplinary Memory Forums. The forum brought together artists, scientists, curators, writers, philosophers, anthropologists, photojournalists and researchers to discuss the experience, construction and mediation of memory in the context of war. The event began with an opportunity for participants to view Shona Illingowrth's video and sound installation The Watch Man, at the Wellcome Collection. A series of short presentations were given by Shona Illingworth, Martin A. Conway, Alexandra Argenti-Pillen, Catherine Panter-Brick, Tom Stoddart and Jason Franks followed by open discussion.
  • Illingworth, S. (2008). Karlag - memory, trauma, landscape. In: Timecode.
    Panel presentation by Shona Illingworth on her work Karlag, to mark the opening of the exhibition of Karlag with an installation by Riccardo Benassi as part of the Timecode series of exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art Bologna.
  • Illingworth, S. (2007). Conflicts of Memory - Balnakiel, research in progress. In: Northlands Creative Glass Annual International Conference: Expression of Self.
  • Illingworth, S. (2006). The Influence of Memory on Forgetting.
    The Influence of Memory on Forgetting was the second in a series of interdisciplinary discussion forums devised and curated by Shona Illingworth in collaboration with cognitive neuro-psychologist and memory researcher Professor Martin A. Conway, in association with a range of host organisations to explore understanding and articulation of ideas about human memory across a range of different disciplines and social, political and cultural contexts. Participants included: Professor Martin A. Conway (now at City University); Dr Christopher Badcock (Reader in Sociology, LSE) ; Polly Carter (Education Co-ordinator, Photoworks); Dr Mohini Chandra (artist); Peter Cross (Visual Arts Officer, Arts Council England, London); Pauline De Souza (Director of the Diversity Arts Forum; Rebecca Drew (Deputy Director, Photoworks; Dr Ben Dyson, (Department of Psychology, University of Sussex; Melanie Friend (documentary photographer; Kate Forde (Curator of Exhibitions, Wellcome Trust; Elpida Hadzi Vaseleva (artist; Shona Illingworth (artist; Nic Kemp (artist)
    Ruth Maclennan (artist); Professor Ole Gron (Ethno-Archaeologist, Honorary Research Professor, Institute of Archaeology, UCL); Jeremy Theophilus (curator, writer and Co-Director of A Fine Line arts consultancy; Susan Trangmar (artist); Professor Jennifer Rusted (Reader in Experimental Psychology, University of Sussex; Dorothy Sheridan (Director of the Mass Observation Archive, University of Sussex; Emilia Telese, (artist and Artists Networks Coordinator for a-n The Artists Information Company and Luciano Zubillaga (film maker).

Show / exhibition

  • Illingworth, S. (2014). Amnesia Lab - exhibition. [Drawing, Sound installation, video, photography, 3D immersive environment]. Available at: http://www.niea.unsw.edu.au/events/signs-life-brain-and-amnesia-week.
    The Amnesia Lab exhibition at UNSW Galleries, 20 September to 8 November, was co-curated by Jill Bennett, Shona Illingworth and Felicity Fenner. The exhibition presented research-in-progress for Lesions in the Landscape: Claire and the Island of Hirta, a project led by Illingworth (PI), with Professor Martin A. Conway and Dr Catherine Loveday, (funded by the Wellcome Trust, UK), alongside: the Amnesia Atlas (prototype), a 3D immersive SenseCam interface for exploring memory, Volker Kuchelmeister, Jill Bennett, Dennis Del Favero and students at UNSW; Did I? (2011), a video installation by Hiraki Sawa and the Glass Brain, an anatomically realistic 3D visualisation depicting activity from EEG (electroencephalographic) signals, Gazzaley Lab/Neuroscape Lab, UCSF. The exhibition was reviewed in the Australian, print and online, by Penny Durham, 26 September 2014. Shona Illingworth and Felicity Fenner were interviewed by Michael Cathcart for Books and Art Daily, ABC Radio, Tuesday 30 September 2014 10:21am.
  • Illingworth, S. and Nadeem, H. (2012). The Choral Forest. [Sound composition and wall painting]. Available at: http://www.gosh.org/gen/redevelopment/whats-happening-now/the-buildings/morgan-stanley-clinical-building/creative-features/.
    The Choral Forest, 2012, is a permanent public artwork commissioned by Great Ormond Street Hospital as their donor recognition artwork to acknowledge the £15 million donation from Aditya and Megha Mittal for the new Mittal Children’s Centre at the Hospital. This public artwork is situated at the heart of the new Morgan Stanley Clinical Building, and is a collaboration between artist Shona Illingworth and artist Henna Nadeem. It was conceived as a sound and image poem whereby an interplay between the visual rhythms and colour patterns of a geometric abstraction of a forest and a complex, multi-layered and richly textured audio composition of bird calls and ambient sounds, transport the audience across continents. The work comprises a wall painting by Nadeem, which is sound activated by Illingworth, using cutting edge audio technology to create a multi-channel synchronised sound composition that emanates from and moves across, the entire surface of the wall. The project has involved working closely with FeONIC Technology, who specialise in the design and development of magnetostrictive audio products, to create a system using DSP capabilities to create a multichannel audio installation that is both embedded within the architecture and responsive to the changing acoustic environment of the hospital.
  • Illingworth, S. (2010). Balnakiel - Wolverhampton Gallery. [video and sound installation, text, photography, wall painting]. Available at: http://www.wolverhamptonart.org.uk/events/balnakiel-by-shona-illingworth/.
    A solo exhibition of Balnakiel, a video and sound installation and series of artworks at Wolverhampton Art Gallery. Commissioned by Film and Video Umbrella as part of a solo UK tour
  • Illingworth, S. (2009). Balnakiel. [video and sound installation; photography series; single screen video artwork; wall painting; drawing series and photo/text works]. Available at: http://www.fvu.co.uk/projects/detail/commissions/balnakiel.
    Balnakiel (2009 – 11) constitutes a large body of artworks that include: a major video and sound installation; photography series; single screen video artwork; wall painting; drawing series and photo/text works, which examine the spatial effects of wider cultural and geopolitical processes on the evolution of individual and cultural memory and sense of place, and in particular, how the military use of landscape affects a civilian population. This research is embedded in both social issues and academia. Professor Martin A. Conway, cognitive neuropsychologist and one of the foremost international experts in the field of autobiographical memory was a key collaborator. The project involved extensive fieldwork with individuals and contrasting communities of people through creative participatory activities, establishing a large corpus of data in the form of photographs, memory drawings and recorded interviews. This informed interdisciplinary drawing processes developed by Illingworth and Conway, to develop new visual languages for memory informed at a neuropsychological level of understanding, that were manifested three-dimensionally in the sound and moving image installation and related works. This project has been exhibited in solo exhibitions and film screenings internationally, with total audiences exceeding 50,000. In addition there have been a series of public talks, symposia presentations and published interviews by Illingworth on the work. These include, solo exhibitions: John Hansard Gallery, Southampton 17 February - 4 April 2009, and Wolverhampton Art Gallery, 6 February - 1 May 2010, screening events: Whitechapel Art Gallery, in conversation with Professor Patrick Wright, 22 September 2012; Artprojx Cinema, SVA theatre and Armory Show, New York 1 March and 3 March 2011; Maas Space, Philadelphia, 29 October 2011; Sublime, Inverness, 23 September 2011, solo tour of the Highlands of Scotland in the Screen Machine, mobile cinema, September 2009, presentations at Symposia: Modern Art Oxford,19 November 2011 and Loughborough University, January 2010. Funded by the Arts Council England, via Film and Video Umbrella and an Arts Award from the Wellcome Trust.
  • Illingworth, S. (2009). The Swimmer and the Forest. [single screen video plus a video, sound and text site specific art installation]. Available at: http://www.arts.lboro.ac.uk/radar/programme_archive/selected_memory/shona_illingworth/.
    a single screen video and sound work, and site specific text and sound installation commissioned by RADAR, Loughborough University’s contemporary arts programme. This work uses sound, film and text to explore the dynamic interplay between imagination, emotion and memory. It examines how the fragmentary experience of memory can challenge our capacity to form coherent narratives for the past and explores what happens to a person when they are unable to construct a rational account for a persistent and deeply troubling memory. The work was shown as a solo site-specific art installation at Loughborough University, 3 December 2009 – 23 January 2010, accompanied by an interdisciplinary symposium, Remembering Painful Pasts, January 2010, organized by Emily Keightley and Michael Pickering, Loughborough University, which explored how painful pasts are negotiated and communicated in their capacity disrupt and complicate the process of remembering and the products of memory. A further screening took place at Wimbledon Space, Wimbledon College of Art, curated by Artprojx and WorkinProgress.
  • Illingworth, S. (2009). Vertical Sound Map. [Wall painting and new audio technology].
    A public art commission: wall painting and sound work using cutting edge audio technologies embedded into architecture.
  • Illingworth, S. (2007). The Watch Man - Wellcome Collection. [Video and multi-channel sound installation].
    A solo video and multi-channel sound installation with a resonant floor, using new audio technologies, at the Wellcome Collection, London to coincide with their exhibition War and Medicine.
  • Illingworth, S. (2007). The Watch Man - Interaccess Electronic Media Arts Centre. [video and multi-channel sound installation].
    A solo video and multi-channel sound installation with a resonant floor, using new audio technologies, at Interaccess Electronic Media Arts Centre, Toronto part of the exhibition programme for the International Images Festival of Film, Video and New Media. With catalogue and exhibition publication.
  • Illingworth, S. (2007). The Watch Man - Dilston Grove. [video and multi-channel sound installation]. Available at: http://www.cgplondon.org/exhibition_thumbs.php?exhibition_id=121&show_rand=0&show_view=0&locale=DILSTON%20GROVE.
    A solo video and multi-channel sound installation with a resonant floor, using new audio technologies, at Dilston Grove, London
  • Illingworth, S. (2007). Karlag - Museum of Modern Art Bologna. [video installation].
    Installation of Karlag by Shona Illingworth in a two person staging with Riccardo Benassi for the exhibition Timecode curated by Alessandra Pioselli and Fabiola Naldi.
  • Illingworth, S. (2007). Karlag, Tomb and Mound. [video installation and slide projection].
    A series of works exhibited in Central Asian Project, curated by Anna Harding, Kathy Rae Huffman and Yuliya Sorokina, at SPACE, London, Cornerhouse, Manchester, Tengry Umai Gallery, Almaty, Kazakhstan, Center of Art-East Group, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Svetopis Gallery, Tashkent, Uzbekistan
  • Illingworth, S. (2006). BOOK. [Curated over 20 Artist Books].
    An exhibition of over 20 specially produced artists books curated by Shona Illingworth at at private house on Mortimer Road, London and touring to UH Galleries, Margaret Harvey Gallery, St Albans - including Sonia Boyce, Henna Nadeem, Joy Gregory, Oreet Ashery, Elpida Hadzi Vaseleva and Lala Meridith Vula
  • Illingworth, S. (2006). DRILL. [Video and sound installation].
    Exhibtion, curated by Levent Caligoklu, Senior Curator, Istanbul Modern and Alice Sharpe, including Dryden Goodwin, Rachel Lowe, Simon Faithful and Ergin Cavusoglu. With Catalogue.
  • Illingworth, S. (2006). Karlag - KZ UK. [video installation].
    Karlag video installation in KZ-UK, curated by Yuliya Sorokina, National Gallery, Almaty, Kazakhstan

Internet publication

  • Illingworth, S. (2010). Balnakiel - Interview [internet]. Available at: http://www.apengine.org/2010/03/shona-illingworth/.
    APEngine interviewed Shona Illingworth about her exhibition Balnakiel, which was showing at Wolverhampton Art Gallery 6 February - 1 May 2010.

Other

  • Illingworth, S. (2014). El Cine Como Teoria Direct: Shona Illingworth. [Dedicated film screening and discussion].
    A screening of Shona Illingworth's films: Balnakiel (2009) and The Watch Man (2007) at the Museum of Modern Art Buenos Aires. Curated by Luciano Zubillaga.
  • Illingworth, S. (2014). Amnesia Lab - symposium. [Exhibition, EEG sonification, drawing, and immersive interaction - international symposium]. Available at: http://www.niea.unsw.edu.au/events/signs-life-brain-and-amnesia-week.
    The Amnesia Lab, was an experimental symposium in an exhibition setting, co-designed by Shona Illingworth and Jill Bennett (UNSW). It took place at the UNSW Galleries and NIEA iCinema Lab 23 – 25 September 2014 as part of the Signs of Life; Brain and Amnesia Week and brought together memory experts, artists and writers to explore how photographic images, sound and immersive media can advance our understanding of memory and forgetting. The Lab is part of an ongoing research collaboration led by artist Shona Illingworth with cognitive neuropsychologist Martin A. Conway (City University, London) and neuropsychologist Catherine Loveday (Westminster) in the UK, and by Jill Bennett (UNSW) in Australia. Ilingworth, Conway, Loveday, Bennett and colleagues staged a series of discussions in specially designed environments, utilising techniques such as EEG sonification, drawing, and immersive interaction. The Lab presented research-in-progress for Lesions in the Landscape: Claire and the Island of Hirta, a project led by Shona Illingworth and funded by the Wellcome Trust, UK, and focused in particular on the use of imagery from Sense Cam (a wearable sensory operated camera) as memory cue in the context of amnesia. Sessions included a focus on the workings of episodic memory and memory cues, and their relationship to photographic imagery; the issues of perspective and viewpoint in memory, and visual-kinaesthetic perception. Presentations were given by the research team and by cognitive scientist and philosopher John Sutton (Macquarie), psychologists Amanda Barnier and Celia Harris (Macquarie University) and Elise van den Hoven (UTS). Public lectures included Digital Amnesia: Design for Forgetting, Corina Sas (Lancaster) and iMemory: Why the past is all over, Andrew Hoskins (Glasgow).
  • Illingworth, S. (2013). Balnakiel - Unmarked Space. [video and sound installation].
    Screening of film Balnakiel at the Unmarked Space Festival, Lotseninsel, Germany
  • Illingworth, S. (2012). Film and Book Launch: Shona Illingworth: Balnakiel. [Film screening and interview]. Available at: http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/shop/product/category_id/199/product_id/1396.
    London premiere of Shona Illingworth’s film set in the village of Balnakiel in the far North West of Scotland, where the artist grew up, which investigates memory, history and spirit-of-place. Plus interview with Illingworth and writer Patrick Wright at the Whitechapel Gallery, London.
  • Illingworth, S. (2012). Interior Voices. [Online podcast]. Available at: http://thevoxlab.org/public-events/interior-voices/.
    Psychologist and novelist Charles Fernyhough and filmmaker Shona Illingworth discuss voices and interiority, memory, sound and landscape.

    Recorded live on 11 May 2012 at the Artsadmin Cafe, London. This was the third in a series of public conversation with leading researchers exploring different aspects of the voice, chaired by James Wilkes.
  • Illingworth, S. (2011). Balnakiel. [Video and sound].
    Balnakiel screening for the Wellcome Trust showcase, Artprojx Cinema, SVA theatre and Armory Show, New York
  • Illingworth, S. (2011). Balnakiel - Maas Space. [Video and sound].
    Screening of Balnakiel at Maas Space, Philidelphia, curated by Jesse Pires
  • Illingworth, S. (2008). The Feminist Inheritance, a view from the UK,. [Film].
    Screening of Shona Illingworth's film DRILL (2002) at the Museum of Fine Art, Lausanne, Switzerland in a programme curated by Catherine Elwes.
  • Illingworth, S. (2006). mia.net launch, exhibition and memory forum. [website, exhibition and interdisciplinary forum]. Available at: http://www.colemanprojects.org.uk/2006/05/web-launch/.
    The launch of the project website www.mia.net, an exhibition of research-in-progress and a Memory Forum. The Memory Forum was the first in a series of interdisciplinary discussion forums devised and curated by Shona Illingworth in collaboration with cognitive neuro-psychologist and memory researcher Professor Martin A. Conway, in association with a range of host organisations to explore understanding and articulation of ideas about human memory across a range of different disciplines and social, political and cultural contexts. Participants included: Shona Illingworth Chair; Professor David Adger, (Linguist, Queen Mary, University of London)
    Francis Coleman, (Director, Coleman Project Space); Lucy Day, (Curator); Stephen Desmond, (Deputy Director, Centre for Conflict Resolution Journalism, Northern Ireland); Paul Eachus (Artist); Joy Gregory, (Artist); Professor Ole Gron, (Ethno-Archaeologist, Honorary Research Professor, Institute of Archaeology, UCL); Dr Hermione Harris, (Anthropologist, research associate, SOAS); Mark Ingham, (Artist); Professor Anson Mackay, (Paleo-ecologist, University College London); Dr Uriel Orlow, (Artist); Witold Starecki, (Filmmaker) and Luciano Zubillaga, (Filmmaker)
  • Illingworth, S. (2006). Central Asian Project. [Lecture Tour].
    A lecture tour to Almaty, Astana and Karaganda in Kazakhstan, organised by SPACE, UK, Cornerhouse, UK and AsiaArt, Kazakhstan, supported by the British Council.

Visual media

  • Illingworth, S. (2014). 216 Westbound. [Film, 17 minutes, HD, DVD]. Animate Projects Arts Council England. Available at: http://www.animateprojects.org/films/by_date/20141/216_westbound.
    216 Westbound is a single screen film by Shona Illingworth, commissioned by Animate Projects and supported by an Individual Grant for the Arts from Arts Council England. It is part of a wider research project that involves working closely with John Tulloch, survivor of the 7/7 London Bombing (2005) to explore the long-term affects of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) on his spatial orientation and capacity to navigate the city - in relation to the wider affect of media representations and State interrogation of the Bombings on collective memory. The film explores the complex intersections and instabilities between memory, history and subjectivity as they evolve over time and location, traced through John’s life as it moves through and is profoundly affected by this major historical event. Where an image of John emerging injured from the Underground, became a global iconic image of the attack, John’s PTSD amplifies another, less visible but equally powerful affect of the 7/7 bombings on collective memory: the mapping of a new topography of latent threat and fear onto space. Using experimental editing and sound composition, the contrast between the impact of media dissemination of the attack on the complex construction of collective and cultural memory, and the profound affects of an embodied experience of a traumatic event and its dispersal through the collective body politic is explored. Animation is used to disturb and interrupt the flow of images, offer counter narratives and amplify a deeper topography of emotion and affect. The project sets out to create an intricate mapping across the processes of state interrogation, media dissemination and powerful subjectivities, memory and experiences, which intersect across and through this major site of violence.

    The wider research project draws on interdisciplinary dialogues with Martin A. Conway, neuropsychologist and one of the foremost international experts in the field of autobiographical memory, whose work explores the centrality of memory to our sense of self and Tobias Reichenbach, a biophysicist and auditory neuroscientist at Imperial College London, whose research uses ideas from theoretical physics, mathematics, and computer science to investigate how biological systems and the brain function. Together with the Centre for Blast Injury Studies at Imperial College he investigates the impact of blasts on hearing.
  • Illingworth, S. (2013). Topologies of Air/Ruith Na Gaoithe. [Photo-text series]. Sea Change for Cape Farewell.
    Topologies of Air/Ruith na Gaoithe explores ecological, cultural, social, military and historical perception and definition of ‘air space’ in the north Atlantic in the context of the proposed development of the Outer Hebrides as an ‘eco – energy’ producer. The transformation of natural phenomena such as wind energy into a significant economic resource and the impact this has on the perceptual mapping of the Outer Hebrides is explored through the development of a new approach to the multi-layered spatial mapping of place in which cultural, social, economic and scientific languages, stories, songs, poetry and mapping processes intersect in a series of photo-text works.
    This research through practice project draws on interdisciplinary research undertaken in dialogue with paleo-ecologist Professor Anson Mackay and cultural geographer Dr Issie MacPhail, and on field research undertaken in the Outer Hebrides during a five week research residency at Taigh Chearsabhagh Museum and Arts Centre, North Uist, in 2012. This included undertaking research in Council archives, Taigh Chearsabhagh Museum archives and the Scottish Screen archives (Glasgow), and extensive interviews and recording of Gaelic song and poetry.
  • Illingworth, S. (2012). In Transit. [Two short film commissions]. Project Art Works, UK.
    Two film for In Transit, a project that uses film to develop voice and agency for individuals with profound neurological impairments during transition from child to adult services. Commissioned by Project Art Works, UK.
  • Illingworth, S. (2007). Karlag. [Film, 16 minutes, DVD.]. SPACE, Cornerhouse, and Asia Art, Arts Council England, British Council.
    Karlag explores the elision between memory and history, and the traumatic impact processes of cultural and historical amnesia have on individual identity and experience, for populations whose lives remain suspended and without agency within dominant power structures that are focused on promoting new utopian futures. Filmed in the Karlag, a former GULAG in Northeast Kazakhstan, (a major Soviet prison camp of over 600 sq km) the film is set in this vast desert Steppe, with its open cast mines, pylons and former prison camps. Karlag draws on the conflicting experiences of former prisoners and guards of the prison camp, Dolinka, where, following the effective closure of the Gulag system, they still live side by side, as they have nowhere else to go.
    Decaying remnants of this formidable system of forced-labour appear in the film, where amongst the fragile remains, the extraordinary scale of hardship, loss and human endurance is now almost invisible. The film moves continually through this landscape, where past trauma is bourne out and voiced through memory and visions: a sickness descending on people following the launch of a Soyuz TMA-9 space rocket from the Russian space station at Baikanur, 500 miles away; a tree lined city avenue, appearing like a mirage and leading nowhere, built through enforced hard labour by intellectuals in the middle of the Steppe; the now derelict central administration building, its windows sealed, its interior in darkness.
  • Illingworth, S. (2007). The Watch Man. [Video and multi-channel sound installation, 17 minutes]. Arts Council England.
    The Watch Man (17 minutes), is an video and immersive multi-channel sound installation which uses new audio technologies developed by FeONIC to create a red luminous floor that resonates with sound across its entire surface. The Watch Man examines how individual memory refers to a traumatic set of collective memories over a lifetime period. Drawing on cognitive neuropsychologist Martin A. Conway’s theories of memory, through ongoing dialogue, the Watch Man explores the conflict between trauma memory and the need for a coherent ‘life story’ through the experience of an 80 year old watchmaker, who as a 19 year old British soldier experienced one of the most deeply affecting and shocking events in the Second World War.

    Illingworth, S., Conway, M. A., Albano, C., Bennett, J., Bode, S. (2011). The Watch Man, Balnakiel: works by Shona Illingworth. London: Film and Video Umbrella, was dedicated to Two of Illingworth's projects: The Watch Man and Balnakiel (2009). The Watch Man has been written about extensively in books, journals and media including a major case study in Bennett, J. (2012) Practical Aesthetics: Art, Affect and Events After 9/11, IB Tauris, London, and in Albano, C. (2012) Fear and Contemporary Art – two chapters featuring, ‘The Watch Man’ and ‘Bare Dust’, Reaktion Book and Albano, C. (2008) Uncanny: a dimension of contemporary art. ESSE arts and opinions, Fear 2 (62). pp. 4-11. The Watch Man was exhibited in solo installations at: Dilston Grove, London; Interaccess Electronic Media Arts Centre, Toronto with the International Images Festival of Film, Video and New Media and at the Wellcome Collection, London to coincide with their exhibition War and Medicine. It has recently been screened at the Museum of Modern Art Buenos Aires in a special screening of Illingworth’s films, 14 November 2014.
  • Illingworth, S. (2007). Tomb. [Film, 7 minutes DVD]. SPACE, London; Cornerhouse, Manchester; AsiaArt, Kazakhstan.
    Tomb (7 mins) was filmed in the Karlag, Northeast Kazakhstan’s former Soviet Gulag, (a major forced labour camp of over 600 sq km).
    Tomb explores the complex consequences of the disappearance of material evidence of the Karlag and the haunting atmospheres of trauma memory, which remain, through fragmented images of the northeast Kazakh Steppe where it was located. The scarcity of information or mapping of this landscape, and the consequent difficulty in comprehending the human scale of Gulag is evoked in the film through dramatic shifts in scale , where ariel views of the immense open Steppe close in on the abandoned ruined trenches, dug into the earth, were thousands of prisoners of a former hard labour prison camp where once contained. At the centre of the film, the NKVD Villa and Central Administration building of the Karlag GULAG in Dolinka is being sealed. Its doors and windows bricked up, its subterranean spaces and ruined stately rooms hidden in darkness. Sounds of an orchestra playing Arensky’s ballet “The Fountain of Bakhchisarai’ are heard - which it is told once played in the state rooms of the former NKDV Villa, situated above the prison cells and interrogation rooms hidden in the basement below. The physical entombment of this building, all evident of administrative records and files removed, gives way to the sound of stray descendants of former guard dogs barking as dusk falls in the grounds of the now empty building.
  • Illingworth, S. (2006). 5 X 1. [Film, 17 minutes, DVD]. Rideout, The Creative Prison. Available at: http://www.rideout.org.uk/creative_prison.aspx.
    5 x 1 is a two screen film by Shona Illingworth, which takes its name from the proportion of the prison cells inhabited by the prisoners serving life sentences at HMP Gartree, who feature in the work. 5 x 1 was commissioned by Rideout for the Creative Prison Project, a project which combined the design expertise and vision of internationally renowned Alsop architects with the critically engaged practices of artists Shona Illingworth and Jonathan Ford, and the direct experience of staff and life prisoners within a maximum security prison, to design and create a powerful and challenging exhibition, design propositions, series of artworks and publications as a means to generate debate around pressing contemporary issues of the place and role of custody within society.

Forthcoming

  • Illingworth, S. (2015). Topologies of Air - Book. London, UK: Cape Farewell.
    Topologies of Air is a book in progress for the research project Topologies of Air/Ruith na Gaoithe. It will be published by Sea Change for Cape Farewell in 2015. This publication will examine the tensions and dynamic interplays between the multi-layered spatial mappings of place developed through this project, in which cultural, social, economic and scientific languages, stories, songs, poetry and mapping processes intersect, and will situate this research within debates on the Anthropocene, - a term used (though not yet formalised) to refer to a geological age of our own making - and new ecologies of thought, action and critical debate that are emerging as a result.
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