Image representing Biomedical Engineering with a Year in Industry

Biomedical Engineering with a Year in Industry - BEng (Hons)

UCAS code 05C3

2019

This cross-disciplinary programme is designed for students with a strong interest in engineering and biomedicine. Drawing from our established expertise in developing medical-electronic systems and from the research synergies with the School of Biosciences (eg systems biology), the programme produces engineers with a solid knowledge in biology and medical science.

2019

Overview

Nowadays, business and research environments, such as biotechnology, increasingly require engineers who can design complete solutions involving complex integrated systems. Our programme goes beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries and educates engineers that can develop systems used in medical practice and research in biology.

You undertake laboratory practicals in both electronics and biology. Throughout the programme, you carry out projects where you build bioscience-related electronic devices under the supervision of academics from engineering and biosciences. 

Our modules provide a solid knowledge in mathematics, electronics, programming, mechanics, physiology and biology.

You also attend seminars delivered by experts in bioengineering working in private companies, research centres or NHS institutions.

The additional aims of our Year in Industry programme are to give students an opportunity to gain experience as engineers working in a professional environment and to develop employment related skills. The Year in Industry opportunity develops students’ technical skills, employability and soft skills as well as increasing their awareness of the future context for employment.


Independent rankings

Electronic and Electrical Engineering at Kent was ranked 11th for course satisfaction in The Guardian University Guide 2018.

For graduate prospects, Electronic and Electrical Engineering at Kent was ranked 13th in The Guardian University Guide 2018.

In the National Student Survey 2017, 83.6% of students in Electronic and Electrical Engineering were satisfied with the overall quality of their course.

Teaching Excellence Framework

Based on the evidence available, the TEF Panel judged that the University of Kent delivers consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for its students. It is of the highest quality found in the UK.

Please see the University of Kent's Statement of Findings for more information.

TEF Gold logo

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  

On most programmes, you study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also be able to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes so you can customise your programme and explore other subjects that interest you.

Stage 1

Modules may include Credits

This module provides an introduction to contemporary digital systems design. Starting with the fundamental building blocks of digital systems the module outlines both theoretical and practical issues for implementation. Practical work includes the use of digital simulation and analysis software for implementing real-world problems.

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15

Mathematics is the fundamental language of engineering, allowing complex ideas to be formulated and developed. This course provides the sound basis of mathematical techniques and methods required by almost all other modules in the department's engineering courses. Topics covered include functions, set theory, complex numbers, calculus, linear algebra, statistics and probability. The lectures are supported by assessed examples classes, taken in small groups.

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This module expands the introductory mathematics covered in EL318 and provides students with the appropriate mathematical tools necessary for the further study of electronic, mechanical and computer systems. The main emphasis of the course is in applied calculus, which isused to solve real-world engineering problems.. The lectures are supported by assessed examples classes, taken in small groups.

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This module introduces students to main electric components (i.e. resistors, capacitors, inductors, and voltage and current sources) and to operational amplifiers, which are the basic building blocks of many circuits; how do they work and what properties do they have; what are their main usages in circuits and systems; and how to practically perform simple measurements and tests. Also, fundamentals of analysis of electric circuits and the main circuit laws are taught. The teaching of this module makes an extensive use of a computer-aided electronic circuit design and simulation tools to assist in and to amplify traditional lecture-based learning, in addition to worked example and practical sessions. It also includes a mini-project in which students gain practical laboratory experience, including design, physical construction and testing of an example operational amplifier circuit. The module requires some elementary mathematical skills.

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This module is designed to provide experience in the practical and management aspects of project work. It is supported by a lecture course and weekly supervised laboratory sessions. After an initial hands-on introduction to use of bench equipment and the Computer Aided Design (CAD) and fabrication of a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), the project consists of constructing a robot that incorporates an additional PCB of your own construction and the development of software of your own design to enable your robot to address a specific set of tasks.

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Subject-based and communication skills are relevant to all the bioscience courses. This module allows you to become familiar with practical skills, the analysis and presentation of biological data and introduces some basic mathematical and statistical skills as applied to biological problems. It also introduces you to the computer network and its applications and covers essential skills such as note-taking and essay writing.

Topics covered in lectures/workshops:

How biosciences is taught at Kent - lectures, supervisions, problem solving classes, practicals. Effective study and listening skills, note taking and use of the library. Support networks.

General principles of analytical biochemistry - quantitative/qualitative analysis, making and recording measurements. The quality of data - random and systematic error, precision, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.

The manipulation and presentation of data - SI units, prefixes and standard form

Molarities and dilutions -concentration (molarity) and amounts (moles), dilutions.

Acids, bases and buffers in aqueous solutions - Definition of pH, acid and bases (including a revision of logarithms). Acid-base titrations. Buffer mixtures, buffering capacity and the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation.Dissociation of polyprotic, weak acids. Biochemical relevance of pH e.g. pH dependant ionisation of amino acids.

Spectroscopy - The range of electromagnetic radiation. Absorption and emission of radiation. Molecular absorptiometry - the use of the Beer-Lambert relationship for quantitative measurements using absolute or comparative methods (molar and specific extinction coefficients).

Reaction Kinetics. Reactions and rates of change: Factors affecting the rate of a reaction. Zero, first and second order reactions. Rate constants and rate equations (including integration). Worked examples of rates of reactions.

Statistics Descriptive statistics: definition of statistics, sampling, measurement scales, data hierarchy, summarising data, averaging, mean, mode, median, quantiles, graphical methods, displaying proportions, charts and chart junk. Parametrising distributions: coefficient of variation, normal distribution, properties of the normal curve, skewness and kurtosis, accuracy and precision.

Probability: definition, events, exclusivity and conditional probability, throwing dice and tossing coins, independent and dependent events, permutations, multiplicative rule, binomial distribution, unequal probabilities, Pascal's triangle, factorials and combinations.

Hypothesis testing: null hypothesis, p-value, normal curve, z-score and t-score, t values and confidence interval, t-tables, comparing two samples, degrees of freedom, t-tests for same and different sample sizes, paired samples, difference between means.

Correlation and covariance: two-dimensional distributions, scatter diagram, degree and limits of correlation, spurious correlation, correlation and causality, time correlation, normalising the covariance, covariance in spreadsheet calculations.

Regression: the regression line, slope and intercept parameters, regression in spreadsheet calculations, history of regression, assumptions in regression, effect of outliers, how not to use statistics.

Practicals:

1. Introduction to basic laboratory techniques-

a) preparation of buffer solutions and

b) determination of accuracy

2. pH and buffers

3. Colorimetry and Spectrophotometry

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This course will provide an introduction to biomolecules in living matter. The simplicity of the building blocks of macromolecules (amino acids, monosaccharides, fatty acids and nucleotides) will be contrasted with the enormous variety and adaptability that is obtained with the different macromolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids). The molecular structure of macromolecules will be highlighted and linked with function of the macromolecules in living cells and organisms. Physical methods for purifying, characterising and further investigating macromolecules will be described including spectroscopy, chromatography and electrophoresis. The module will be delivered by lectures, laboratory sessions and a model-building workshop. Feedback will be given on the formative lab-based sessions to ensure students understand what is expected in the assessed practical. Short tests (formative only, on Moodle) will be used during the module to help students test their own knowledge and one summative (assessed) MCQ will monitor that the right material has been extracted from taught sessions.

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This course will expose students to key themes and experimental techniques in molecular biology, genetics and eukaryotic cell biology illustrated by examples from a wide range of microbial and mammalian systems. It will cover basic cell structure, and organisation of cells into specialized cell types and complex multi-cellular organisms. The principles of cell cycle and cell division will be outlined. The control of all living processes by genetic mechanisms will be introduced and an opportunity to handle and manipulate genetic material provided in practicals. Lectures and practicals will run concurrently as far as possible and monitoring of students' knowledge and progress will be provided by multi-choice testing and feedback.

Functional Geography of Cells: Introduction to Cell Organisation, Variety and Cell Membranes. Molecular Traffic in Cells. Organelles involved in Energy and Metabolism. Eukaryotic Cell

Cycle. Chromosome Structure & Cell Division. Meiosis and Recombination.

Molecular biology: The structure and function of genetic material. Chromosomes, chromatin structure, mutations, DNA replication, DNA repair and recombination, basic mechanisms of transcription, mRNA processing and translation.

Techniques in Molecular and Cellular Biology: Methods in Cell Biology - light and electron microscopy; cell culture, fractionation and protein isolation/electrophoresis; antibodies, radiolabelling. Gene Cloning – vectors, enzymes, ligation, transformation, screening; hybridisation, probes and blots, PCR, DNA sequencing. Applications including recombinant protein expression, trangenics/knockouts, RNAi, genome projects, DNA typing, microarray and '…omics' studies (genome, proteome, interactome, metabolome etc).

Practical: Restriction digestion of DNA and gel analysis (whole day)

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Stage 2

Modules may include Credits

This module will consider the anatomy and function of normal tissues, organs and systems and then describe their major pathophysiological conditions. It will consider the etiology of the condition, its biochemistry and its manifestation at the level of cells, tissues and the whole patient. It will cover the diagnosis of the condition, available prognostic indicators and treatments.

It will include:

Cells and tissues

Membrane dynamics

Cell communication and homeostasis

Introduction to the nervous system

The cardiovascular system

The respiratory system

The immune system and inflammation

Blood cells and clotting

The digestive system, liver and pancreas

The Urinary system

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A. Communication Skills in Biosciences: Essay writing, oral presentations, laboratory reports, the scientific literature and literature reviews. Working in groups.

B. Techniques in Biomolecular Science: Immunochemistry. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibody production, immuno-chromatography, ELISA and RIA.

Electrophoresis, Immunoblotting, Protein Determination, Activity Assays, Purification

C. Computing for Biologists: Bioinformatics, phylogenetic trees, database searches for protein/DNA sequences

D. Mini-project – introduction to research skills: Students will work in groups of eight to undertake directed experimental work (Group Project) before extending the project further through self-directed experiments working as a pair (Mini Project).

E. Careers: The programme will be delivered by the Careers Advisory Service and will review the types of careers available for bioscience students. The sessions will incorporate personal skills, careers for bioscience graduates, records of achievement, curriculum vitae preparation, vacation work, postgraduate study, interview skills and action planning.

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The aim of this module is to provide the students with the understanding of how the human body can be represented as a mechanical system and then analysed using principles of mechanics. For example the module explains how muscles and joints act as structures to provide equilibrium or generate movement. To achieve this, the module introduces firstly the concepts of statics, dynamics and mechanisms, and subsequently the module shows how these concepts can be applied to analyse the human body as a mechanical system.

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Lecture Syllabus

AC CIRCUITS

The phasor concept. Phasor relationships for R, L and C elements. Circuit laws using phasors. AC power. Instantaneous power. Average power. Effective value of a sinusoidal waveform. Maximum power transfer and conjugate matching. The transformer. Using transformers in circuit matching.

ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS

Semiconductors, conductors and insulators. Conduction in semiconductors. N-type and P-type semiconductors. The PN junction. Biasing the PN junction, current voltage characteristics. The PN diode, ideal and practical models. The Zener diode. Optical diodes. Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) and Field Effect Transistor (FET). Basic operation, characteristics, parameters and biasing. The transistor as an amplifier. The transistor as a switch. Transistor packages.

GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF MEASUREMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION

Purpose, structure and classification of measurement systems. Systematic characteristics (range and span, errors and accuracy, linearity, sensitivity and hysteresis). Noise and noise reduction. Calibration, traceability and standards. Power supplies, regualtion and isolation.

SENSING DEVICES

Introduction of a range of sensors and transducers. Resistive sensors. Capacitive sensors. Ultrasonic sensors. Electromagnetic sensors. Optical sensors. Radiological sensors. Semiconductor sensing elements. Measurement of temperature, pressure, displacement, force and flow.

PHYSIOLOGICAL SIGNALS

Body temperature. The circulation, blood flow and blood pressure. Muscles and the EMG.The heart, the ECG and micovolt cardiac potentials. Speech and speech therapy. Hearing and audiology.

MEDICAL DEVICES

Special requirements for medical instrumentation – size and weight, noise, isolation, and safety. Physiological measurement examples – temperature, flow, EMG, ECG, Audiometry, instrumentation for Speech Therapy. Regulatory and manufacturing requirements – CE marking and MHRA Medical Device Registration.

Coursework

EXAMPLES CLASS – GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF MEASUREMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION

Two assessed classes.

EXAMPLES CLASS – SENSING DEVICES

Two assessed classes.

EXAMPLES CLASS – PHYSIOLOGICAL SIGNALS

An unassessed demonstration of examples of physiological measurement.

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15

The module introduces fundamental techniques employed in image processing and pattern recognition providing an understanding of how practical pattern recognition systems may be developed able to address the inherent difficulties present in real world situations. The material is augmented with a study of biometric and security applications looking at the specific techniques employed to recognise biometric samples.

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The module consists of a practical group project involving both hardware and software. Also included is a series of supporting lectures. Students work in groups of typically four. The project provides an opportunity for students to gain experience not only in technical areas such as PC based data acquisition, computer interfacing, visual programming and hardware design and construction but also in transferable skills including team working, project management, technical presentations and report writing.

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15

This module introduces basic concepts and techniques for describing and analysing continuous and discrete time signals and systems. It also introduces the fundamentals of feedback control systems, covering techniques for the analysis and design of such systems.

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15

The module provides an introduction to the basic knowledge required to understand, design and write computer programs and the basic principles underlying the process of Software Engineering. No previous programming experience is assumed and the module proceeds via a sequence of lectures supported by simple exercises designed to give practical experience of the concepts introduced in the lectures.

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15

Year in industry

You spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. We have a dedicated Employability Officer who will help you apply for placements; but please note that it is your responsibility to secure a placement, which cannot always be guaranteed. The School has excellent industrial links, providing students with many placement opportunities.

You can also apply for a placement offered through the School's exchange agreement with Hong Kong City University.

Please note that progression thresholds apply. In particular, in order to be considered for an industrial placement, you are required to achieve an overall mark at Stage 1 of at least 60%.

There are many benefits to taking the Year in Industry. Information specific to this programme can be found in the Year in industry Engineering and Digital Arts leaflet.

Modules may include Credits

Students spend a year (minimum 30 weeks) working in an industrial or commercial setting, applying and enhancing the skills and techniques they have developed and studied in the earlier stages of their degree programme. The work they do is entirely under the direction of their industrial supervisor, but support is provided via a dedicated Placement Support Officer and Placement Tutor within the School. This support includes ensuring that the work they are being expected to do is such that they can meet the learning outcomes of the module.

Note that participation in this module is dependent on students obtaining an appropriate placement, for which guidance is provided through the School in the years leading up to the placement. Students who do not obtain a placement will be required to transfer to the appropriate programme without a Year in Industry.

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Students spend a year (minimum 30 weeks) working in an industrial or commercial setting, applying and enhancing the skills and techniques they have developed and studied in the earlier stages of their degree programme. The work they do is entirely under the direction of their industrial supervisor, but support is provided via a dedicated Placement Support Officer and Placement Tutor within the School. This support includes ensuring that the work they are being expected to do is such that they can meet the learning outcomes of the module.

Note that participation in this module is dependent on students obtaining an appropriate placement, for which guidance is provided through the School in the years leading up to the placement. Students who do not obtain a placement will be required to transfer to the appropriate programme without a Year in Industry.

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Stage 3

Modules may include Credits

Reproductive System: Male and female reproductive systems; Endocrine control of reproduction; Fertilisation; Early embryogenesis; Pregnancy and Parturition; Reproductive disorders.

Muscle: Muscle types: skeletal, smooth and cardiac; Structure of muscle; Molecular basis of contraction; Regulation of contraction including neural control; Energy requirements of muscle; Types of movement: reflex, voluntary, rhythmic; Muscle disorders.

Nervous System Cells of the nervous system: neurons and glia; Electrical properties of neurons: action potential generation and conduction; Synaptic structure and function: transmitters and receptors; Structural organization of the central nervous system (CNS) and function of individual regions; Organization and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS): somatic motor, autonomic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) and sensory; Sensory systems: vision, hearing, taste, smell, pain. Disorders of the nervous system.

Endocrine System: Endocrine glands; Classes of hormones; Mechanisms of hormone action; Regulation of hormone release; Endocrine disorders.

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Introduction to the project, research techniques, poster design, report structure and writing.

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Biomaterials are those materials intended to interface with biological systems to assess, treat, support or replace any tissue, organ or function of the body. The aim of this module is to provide the students with the understanding of biomaterials with special reference to their interaction with the biological environment. To achieve this, the module introduces firstly mechanics of materials, by explaining the concepts such as stress, strain, bending and shear. Subsequently the module provides examples of biomaterials and how they are used in the human body.

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This module introduces the issues relating to the development of commercial electronic products. Topics include design, production techniques, the commercial background of a company, quality, safety and electromagnetic compatibility standards, electromagnetic compatibility issues and product reliability, ethical and environmental issues.

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15

A. Bioinformatics Data sources & Sequence analysis:

Databases and data availability. Using sequence data for analysis – sequence searching methods, multiple sequence alignments, residue conservation, Phylogenetics, Protein domains and families (e.g. Pfam, Interpro).

B. Protein Bioinformatics Methods

Protein structure and function prediction. Prediction of binding sites/interfaces with small ligands and with other proteins. Bioinformatics analyses using protein data.

C. Genomics

An introduction to DNA analysis methods moving onto omics approaches, primarily focussing on the data available from DNA sequencing – how it can be used to compare genomes (comparative and functional genomics). Metagenomics and transcriptomics will also be covered.

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The Molecular Biology of Cancer: Regulation of gene expression; Growth factor signalling and oncogenes; Growth inhibition and tumour suppressor genes; the Cell Cycle and apoptosis.

Cancer stem cells and differentiation; chemo-resistance and metastasis.

DNA structure and stability: mutations versus repair.

Tumour immunology; targeted cancer therapies and clinical trial design.

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The aim of the module in Medical Physics is to provide a primer into this important physics specialisation. The range of subjects covered is intended to give a balanced introduction to Medical Physics, with emphasis on the core principles of medical imaging, radiation therapy and radiation safety. A small number of lectures is also allocated to the growing field of optical techniques. The module involves several contributions from the Department of Medical Physics at the Kent and Canterbury Hospital.

SYLLABUS:

Radiation protection (radiology, generic); Radiation hazards and dosimetry, radiation protection science and standards, doses and risks in radiology; Radiology; (Fundamental radiological science, general radiology, fluoroscopy and special procedures); Mammography (Imaging techniques and applications to health screening); Computed Tomography (Principles, system design and physical assessment); Diagnostic ultrasound (Pulse echo principles, ultrasound imaging, Doppler techniques); Tissue optics (Absorption, scattering of light in the tissue); The eye (The eye as an optical instrument); Confocal Microscopy (Principles and resolutions); Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and applications; Nuclear Medicine (Radionuclide production, radiochemistry, imaging techniques, radiation detectors); In vitro techniques (Radiation counting techniques and applications); Positron Emission Tomography (Principles, imaging and clinical applications); Radiation therapies (Fundamentals of beam therapy, brachytherapy, and 131I thyroid therapy); Radiation Protection (unsealed sources); Dose from in-vivo radionuclides, contamination, safety considerations.

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Teaching and assessment

Teaching/learning

Teaching is delivered through lectures, tutorial lectures, demonstrator-led examples classes, tutor-led small group supervisions; project work; laboratory experiments and computer-based assignments.  Case studies on industry hot topics and emerging technologies. In particular the first, second and third-year projects give hands-on experience of electronic design and project management.

Problem-solving workshops allow you to develop skills in applying biomedical knowledge to the solution of problems. Practical classes teach specific laboratory skills and demonstrate how they can be used to investigate biomedical systems.

Assessment

Written unseen examinations; assessed coursework in the form of examples class assignments, laboratory write-ups, assessed project work, assignments and essays and class tests.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • Educate students to become engineers who are well equipped for professional careers in development, research and production in industry and universities, and who are well adapted to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing subject.
  • Produce professional engineers skilled in Biomedical engineering with a well-balanced knowledge of Electronic System Engineering.
  • Provide proper academic guidance and welfare support for all students.
  • Create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer the students an environment where they can develop their potential.
  • Give an opportunity to gain experience as an engineer working in a professional environment. To develop employment-related skills, including an understanding of how you relate to the structure and function in an organisation, via a year in industry.

    Learning outcomes

    Knowledge and understanding

    You gain knowledge and understanding of:

    • Mathematical principles relevant to bioengineering
    • Scientific principles and methodology relevant to bioengineering
    • Advanced concepts of instrumentation and systems engineering.
    • The value of intellectual property and contractual issues
    • Business and management techniques which may be used to achieve engineering objectives
    • The need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering
    • Current manufacturing practice with particular emphasis on product safety and EMC standards and directives
    • Characteristics of materials, equipment, processes and products
    • Appropriate codes of practice, industry standards and quality issues
    • Contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied
    • The structure, function and control of the human body
    • The main metabolic pathways used in biological systems in catabolism and anabolism, understanding biological reactions in chemical terms
    • The variety of mechanisms by which metabolic pathways can be controlled and the way that they can be co-ordinated with changes in the physiological environment
    • The main principles of cell and m
    • The main methods for communicating information on biomedical sciences
    • Aspects of the core subject areas from the perspective of a commercial or industrial organisation.

    Intellectual skills

    You gain the following intellectual abilities:

    • Analysis and solution of problems in bioengineering using appropriate mathematical methods
    • Ability to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering and bioscience disciplines to support study of bioengineering
    • Use of engineering and bioscience principles and the ability to apply them to analyse key bioengineering processes 
    • Ability to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
    • Ability to apply and understand a systems approach to bioengineering problems 
    • Ability to investigate and define a problem and identify constraints including cost drivers, economic, environmental, health and safety and risk assessment issues
    • Ability to use creativity to establish innovative, aesthetic solutions whilst understanding customer and user needs, ensuring fitness for purpose of all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal 
    • Ability to demonstrate the economic and environmental context of the engineering solution
    • Integrate scientific evidence, to formulate and test hypotheses
    • Recognise the moral and ethical issues of biomedical investigations and appreciate the need for ethical standards and professional codes of conduct
    • Apply some of the intellectual skills specified for the programme from the perspective of a commercial or industrial organisation.

    Subject-specific skills

    You gain subject-specific skills in the following:

    • Use of mathematical techniques to analyse problems in bioengineering.
    • Ability to work in an engineering laboratory environment and to use a wide range of electronic equipment, workshop equipment and CAD tools for the practical realisation of electronic circuits 
    • Ability to work with technical uncertainty 
    • Ability to apply quantitative methods and computer software relevant to engineering in order to solve bioengineering problems 
    • Ability to design electronic circuits or systems to fulfil a product specification and devise tests to appraise performance.
    • Awareness of the nature of intellectual property and contractual issues and an understanding of appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
    • Ability to use technical literature and other information sources and apply it to a design 
    • Ability to apply management techniques to the planning, resource allocation and execution of a design project and evaluate outcomes
    • Ability to prepare technical reports and presentations.
    • Apply some of the subject-specific skills specified for the programme from the perspective of a commercial or industrial organisation.

    Transferable skills

    You gain transferable skills in the following:

    • Ability to generate, analyse, present and interpret data
    • Use of Information and Communications Technology
    • Personal and interpersonal skills, work as a member of a team
    • Communicate effectively (in writing, verbally and through drawings)
    • Learn effectively for the purpose of continuing professional development
    • Ability for critical thinking, reasoning and reflection
    • Ability to manage time and resources within an individual project and a group project

    Careers

    Nowadays, health care is facing new challenges that require complex solutions. Business and research environments, such as biotechnology, increasingly require engineers who can design complete solutions involving complex integrated systems.

    There is strong evidence of the need for bioengineers and of the sector’s growth: the European Alliance of Medical and Biological Engineering and Science (EAMBES) state that the sector is vital not only for the health and well-being of European citizens but also for the ‘wealth’ of the European economy; they assert the sector growth rate is about 5-7% per year. The United States Department of Labor predicts that the field of bioengineering is projected to grow by over 70% in the ten year period ending in 2018.

    The new course at EDA expands the portfolio of undergraduate degree programmes at Kent, exploiting research synergies such as the Centre for Molecular Processing, Computational Biology Centre and Kent Health, working collaboratively across Schools and ensuring focus on employability in high-demand areas is maintained.

    Of Electronic and Electrical Engineering students who graduated from Kent in 2016, over 95% were in work or further study within six months (DLHE).


    Year in industry

    Employers are always keen to employ graduates with knowledge of the work environment and some students receive job offers from their placement company.

    Professional recognition

    Accreditation will be applied for from the Engineering Council.

    Entry requirements

    Home/EU students

    The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications. Typical requirements are listed below. Students offering alternative qualifications should contact us for further advice. 

    It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

    New GCSE grades

    If you’ve taken exams under the new GCSE grading system, please see our conversion table to convert your GCSE grades.

    Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
    A level

    ABB including Mathematics and Biology or Chemistry grade B plus Electronics/Physics/Computing AS or A level grade B

    Access to HE Diploma

    The University will not necessarily make conditional offers to all Access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. 

    If we make you an offer, you will need to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

    BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

    The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF; OCR) on a case-by-case basis. Please contact us for further advice on your individual circumstances.

    International Baccalaureate

    34 points overall or 16 points at HL, including Mathematics (not Mathematics Studies) 5 at HL or 6 at SL and Biology 5 at HL or 6 at SL

    International students

    The University welcomes applications from international students. Our international recruitment team can guide you on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about entry requirements for your country.

    If you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes.

    Meet our staff in your country

    For more advice about applying to Kent, you can meet our staff at a range of international events.

    English Language Requirements

    Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

    Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of 'pre-sessional' courses in English for Academic Purposes. You attend these courses before starting your degree programme. 

    General entry requirements

    Please also see our general entry requirements.

    Fees

    The 2019/20 annual tuition fees for this programme are:

    UK/EU Overseas
    Full-time £9250 £19000

    For students continuing on this programme, fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* 

    Your fee status

    The University will assess your fee status as part of the application process. If you are uncertain about your fee status you may wish to seek advice from UKCISA before applying.

    Fees for Year in Industry

    For 2019/20 entrants, the standard year in industry fee for home, EU and international students is £1,385

    Fees for Year Abroad

    UK, EU and international students on an approved year abroad for the full 2019/20 academic year pay £1,385 for that year. 

    Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. 

    Additional costs

    There are no mandatory course-specific costs but please refer to our general additional costspage.

    General additional costs

    Find out more about accommodation and living costs, plus general additional costs that you may pay when studying at Kent.

    Funding

    University funding

    Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. See our funding page for more details. 

    Government funding

    You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

    Scholarships

    General scholarships

    Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

    The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

    At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. 

    The scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications (including BTEC and IB) as specified on our scholarships pages

    The scholarship is also extended to those who achieve AAB at A level (or specified equivalents) where one of the subjects is either Mathematics or a Modern Foreign Language. Please review the eligibility criteria.

    The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. 

    Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

    If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.