Extended Essay - CL6002

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2019-20
Canterbury Spring
View Timetable
6 30 (15) DR K Rudolph

Pre-requisites

None

Restrictions

Cannot be taken in combination with CL6001.

2019-20

Overview

This module addresses one of the fundamental aims of the programme, to familiarise students with the techniques of independent study and practice methodological skills they have acquired/are acquiring in their other modules. Essays may be written on any suitable subject, subject to approval by the convenor, and the module can be linked with any of the modules in the programme. Choices will be informed by the student's personal interests, the fulfilment of the aims of the module, the availability of expert supervision, and the accessibility of relevant material.

Details

This module appears in:


Contact hours

Total Contact Hours: 4
Private Study Hours: 296
Total Study Hours: 300

Method of assessment

Extended Essay (5,000 words) – 100%

Indicative reading

Indicative list, current at time of publication. Reading lists will be published annually
The Chicago Manual of Style (2003), University of Chicago Press, Chicago/London.
http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/home.html

Learning outcomes

On successfully completing the module students will be able to:
8.1 Conducted an independent academic study on a suitable topic of their choosing, under the guidance of an academic supervisor;
8.2 Demonstrate research skills appropriate to their topic, including the use of bibliographical resources, the investigation, comparison and synthesis of different kinds of evidence, and the critical review of primary and secondary sources);
8.3 Write up their conclusions in accordance with accepted scholarly conventions (those governing the formulation of bibliography and references, the presentation of evidence, the use of illustrations &c where appropriate), using word-processing skills;
8.4 Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of and critical appreciation of one academic theme, including an appreciation of the nature and role of the evidence and its analysis, and explanation and discussion in relation to current interpretative frameworks.

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