Student Success

Promoting student equality, diversity and inclusivity


Student Success (EDI) Seminars

The Student Success Project will be running a series of seminars to share details about the project's implementation and research. All staff are invited to attend to share ideas about student success at Kent. If you would like to receive reminders and updates about events and the work of the Student Success Project please join our mailing list

Download the 2018 schedule here. All seminars run 1pm - 2pm. To register your attendance please email studentsuccessproject@kent.ac.uk

Seminar Series 2018/19

 

  • October
  • November
  • January
  • February
  • March
  • April
  • May
  • June

October

Diversity Mark

The Diversity Mark Pilot Project at the University of Kent is a point of commencement for considering the inclusive curriculum. It is a collaborative project between the Student Success Project, Library Services in Information Services, informed by a cross-disciplinary working group.

This work recognises that reading lists are an important representation of the legitimised ideas, theories and perspectives that dominate within a discipline and subject area. Reading lists guide student reading choices, which raises the question about alternative or marginalised perspectives. This pilot, therefore, aims to support academic schools to incorporate more diverse schools of thought and authors within their reading lists.

Three academic schools - SSPSSR Medway, SSES and SECL – are conducting audits of their reading lists, exploring the representation of authors from underrepresented groups, as a contribution to the broader discussion around attainment. We want to better understand the diversity of students’ readings lists and whether this has an impact on the work they submit.

In consultation with academics and students, we will develop a guide to reviewing reading lists, to demonstrate how people can engage in building and developing representative collections.

The presentation will outline progress to date, how we are meeting some of the barriers, and next steps.

This seminar will take place on:

Monday 15 October 2018, Canterbury Campus, Templeman Seminar Room 2

Tuesday 16 October 2018, Medway Campus, Pilkington Building Room 127

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November

Progress Profiles are due to be launch in the Autumn Term 2018/19. They have been developed by the SSP (Student Success Project) in collaboration with PBIO (Planning and Business Information Office) and UELT (Unit for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching).
Training and guidance for the Progress Profiles will be published and circulated shortly. These sessions will be used as a Q&A session open to all University staff.

These events will take place on:

Wednesday 14 November, Medway Campus, Pilkington Building Room 127

Friday 16 November, Canterbury Campus, Cornwallis East Seminar Room 1

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January

Ben Watson from the OPERA project will deliver a seminar on Blackboard Ally. Blackboard Ally is a plugin within the Moodle environment. Ally uses machine learning algorithms to automatically provide alternative formats for course content, giving students immediate access to more accessible alternatives, such as HTML, audio, ePub, electronic Braille and tagged PDF. We are the first university in the UK to have access to this software in Moodle and we are really excited about the positive impact Ally will have on the learning experiences of all our students.

This session will consider how you can use Ally to help you to improve your learning resources for the benefit of everyone.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 16 January 2019, Medway Campus, Pilkington Building Room 127

Friday 18 January 2019, Canterbury Campus, Keynes Seminar Room 13

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February

The Partnership and Development Office will be delivering a seminar on student transition and outreach. More information to be updated shortly.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 20 February 2019, Medway Campus, Drill Hall Library Room 101

Friday 22 February 2019, Canterbury Campus, Woolf Seminar Room 5

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March

The Student Success Project Central Development Officer will be delivering a seminar "Student interest, belonging and engagement: the antecedents of student attainment’

Emerging evidence at Kent suggests that White students and BME students have different levels of interest in their subject and different hopes for their university learning experience (Quinlan, in submission; Quinlan & Salmen, in preparation).

This seminar will present findings from a survey in which data was collected from students at the University of Kent School of Sports and `Exercise Science. The survey sought to answer the following primary research question: To what extent does students’ interest (or lack of interest) impact on their engagement and overall attainment?

This survey aimed to find out about students’ interests, perceptions of the value that they place on their educational outcomes, their expectations of their university learning experience and prior experience with key aspects of the curriculum.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 20 March 2019, Medway Campus, Drill Hall Library Room 101

Friday 22 March 2019, Canterbury Campus, Cornwallis East Seminar Room 1

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April

The School of European Language and Culture will be delivering a seminar on the School’s approach to the project. More information about this seminar will be added close to the time.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 10 April 2019, Medway Campus, TBC

Friday 12 April 2019, Canterbury Campus, TBC

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May

Kent Law School will be delivering a seminar on the School’s approach to the project. More information about this seminar will be added close to the time.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 15 May 2019, Medway Campus, Pilkington Building Room 127

Friday 17 May 2019, Canterbury Campus, Cornwallis East Seminar Room 1

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June

The School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research will be delivering a seminar on the School’s approach to the project. More information about this seminar will be added close to the time.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 19 June 2019, Medway Campus, TBC

Friday 21 June 2019, Canterbury Campus, TBC

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Seminar Series 2017/18

 

  • January
  • February
  • March
  • April
  • May
  • June

January

Virtual Student Advisor (Codename: MyDot)

‘Its hard to find what services are available - sometimes the staff don’t even know – you end up being bounced between departments’

University services are often presented according to the university organisational structure, rather than according to student need. The Virtual Student Advisor (codename: MyDot) aims to change this.
The Student Success Project is proud to be working in partnership with the school of Engineering and Digital Arts, with the aim of consolidating the presentation of university services to students.
This seminar will explore how local need within a school is being used as a starting point to explore the narrative of innovation within the university. We will explore our processes, the system, and uncover some interesting and difficult questions!

  • What process was used to identify need and refine early prototypes?
  • How was this picked up and driven forward internally?
  • Why did the Student Success Project get involved?
  • How does piloting enable experimentation and design refinement?
  • Why are codenames exciting?
  • How are we working to create a system that has the potential to scale to university level?
  • What are some of the most complex questions that we have to find solutions for?
  • If the pilot is successful, where do we go from here?

This seminar will be delivered by James Grant and take place on:

Thursday 18 January 2018, Canterbury Campus, Keynes College, Seminar Room 16, 1pm - 2pm

Friday 19 January 2018, Medway Campus, Pilkington Building, Room 104, 1pm - 2pm

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February

Why monitoring the academic attainment of students with BTECs is important

This talk will be delivered by Dr Lavinia Mitton and explain why monitoring the academic attainment of students with vocational qualifications is important to the Student Success Project.

Successive governments have pledged to enhance the quality of vocational qualifications in England so as to achieve ‘parity of esteem’ with academic study. Yet, at the same time, the discourse of the academic-vocational divide has dominated the academic, policy-maker and practitioner debates.

Further to our 2017 BTEC Report, this talk will present a more in-depth analysis of 17 interviews with Kent students that were designed to explore the student identities of undergraduates who had taken Level 3 BTECs instead of, or alongside, A levels. We analysed the role of the academic–vocational divide in their student identity construction. Our study confirmed that both students and their peers hold assumptions about BTEC learners. While BTECs are marketed as a pathway to higher education, the qualitative evidence we will present suggest that an engrained qualifications hierarchy exists. Our findings indicate that there is an ongoing need to examine how choice in secondary education relates to the reproduction of social inequality at university.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 14 Februry 2018, Canterbury Campus, Keynes College, Seminar Room 14, 1pm - 2pm

Please note this event is on Cantebrury Campus only. A KentPlayer recording of this seminar will be made available on our staff only pages for colleagues who are unable to attend.

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March

Student Success Resources Toolkit

The third seminar will provide an overview and demonstration of the Student Success Resources Toolkit for colleagues across the university. As the Resources Toolkit is set to be launched this session is an opportunity to see the work completed thus far and provide feedback to the central team.

The toolkit aims to compile lessons, resources and tips from interventions and activities of phase 1 into a single place to support staff across the University, both academic and professional services, who wish to run interventions in their schools or departments.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 14 March 2018, Canterbury Campus, Keynes College, Seminar Room 12, 1pm - 2pm

Friday 16 March 2018, Medway Campus, Pilkington Building, Room 104, 1pm - 2pm

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April

Undergraduate Curriculum Review – School of Psychology

The Psychology Undergraduate (UG) Curriculum at the University of Kent requires modernisation and streamlining for a number of reasons; to align with the School’s strategic vision and the overall mission of the University Plan 2015-20, to adapt to increasing UG student numbers and to make best use of the revised British Psychological Society’s accreditation system. With this in mind, an UG Curriculum Review was commissioned. 

Thirty-one members of the school took part in nine focus groups designed to elicit students’ and staff’s opinions of how to improve the curriculum.  Qualitative data from the focus groups was analysed and the most frequently mentioned issues were grouped into eight themes, including 1) increased consistency 2) large, varied cohort teaching 3) core skills, 4) curriculum flow, 5) teaching delivery, 6) avoiding duplication, 7) meeting expectations and improving transferable skills, and 8) student engagement.  Data within each theme is presented in three sections; what works well, systematic issues and suggestions for improvement.

This seminar will provide an overview of the main findings. 

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 11 April 2018, Canterbury Campus, Keynes College, Seminar Room 15, 1pm - 2pm

Friday 13 April 2018, Medway Campus, Pilkington Building, Room 104, 1pm - 2pm

 

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May

Reframing the gap: Bridging ‘deficit’ readings and critical race theory to understand everyday racial inequities in UK universities

The fifth staff seminar will be delivered by the project researcher Dr Alex Hensby and focus on Critical Race Theory.

The past two decades have seen UK universities increase access for students from non-traditional backgrounds, as well as enhance their provision of academic and welfare support, yet across the sector the white-BME attainment gap shows no sign of significantly narrowing. This raises important questions about how racial inequities continue to be reproduced in higher education. Proponents of critical race theory (CRT) offer a direct challenge to longstanding analyses and intervention strategies on the grounds that they take a ‘deficit’ reading of the white-BME attainment gap. Instead, they advocate shifting the onus onto how universities unwittingly reproduce racism and racial inequities structurally and in everyday life.


CRT presents a provocative yet unavoidable challenge to how universities should frame, analyse, and seek to close, the white-BME attainment gap. Drawing on survey and interview data from University of Kent undergraduates, this talk employs a CRT perspective to critique existent approaches to the white-BME attainment gap, as well as foreground the attitudes and experience of students of colour. In so doing, it seeks to bridge so-called deficit readings and CRT to consider how racial inequities are practiced in the classroom and everyday campus life.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 16 May 2018, Canterbury Campus, Woolf College, Seminar Room 5, 1pm - 2pm

Friday 18 May 2018, Medway Campus, Pilkington Building, Room 104, 1pm - 2pm

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June

Diversity Mark

POSTPONED

The Diversity Mark seminar which was due to take place in June has been postponed and will now take place in the Autumn term. The project is working in collaboration with the Academic Liaison Service, Unit for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching and Kent Union to explore our Reading Lists in order to enhance the curricula and promote cultural democracy.

This seminar will be rescheduled for Autumn Term 2018/19

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July

Appointment Management System

‘I know there are support services, but they’re not meant for me – there are people in much greater need and I don’t want to waste their [advisors] time’

For some students, there are barriers to booking on university support services. There may be physical barriers (having to travel to campus to write on a booking sheet), academic barriers (These services are for bad students - I don’t want to appear to be having difficulty), and social barriers (I have to write an email to my advisor – what should I say? What should I wear when I see them? Do I need to dress formally?).

The appointment management system aims to reduce barriers to entry to the academic advisor, and other student support services offered in academic schools. Following developments in Careers Advisory Service, SLAS and SSW, the Student Success Project has worked in partnership with schools to deliver an appointment management system on the Target Connect platform.

In this seminar, we will explore how this works, the benefits, the drawbacks and lessons learned.

This seminar will take place on:

Wednesday 11 July 2018, Canterbury Campus, Woolf College, Seminar Room 6, 1pm - 2pm

Friday 13 July 2018, Medway Campus, Galvanising Shop, Backspace, 1pm - 2pm

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Seminar Series 2016/17

 

  • February
  • March
  • April
  • May
  • June

February

Student Motivation Research

The Student Success team are delighted to invite all staff to the first Student Success mini seminar. The seminar focused on “Student Motivation” by Stephen Earl.

Wednesday 15 February 2017, Medway Campus, Medway Building Room M1-22 1pm – 2pm

Friday 17 February 2017, Canterbury Campus, Grimond Building, GS3, 1pm – 2pm

The seminar will provide an overview of research undertaken in the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences as part of the Student Success Project. The research takes a psychological perspective to student success, investigating how students’ motivation and experiences at university may influence their attainment, engagement and well-being. Underpinned by self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), this work also considers factors that may influence students’ autonomous learning, feelings of competence, and sense of relatedness at university. The aim of the research is to identify how students’ motivation may differ between student groups so we as an institution can better support students’ motivation at university.

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March

Kent Business School, Adaptations

The seminar, which provided an overview of the student experience activities at Kent Business School by Kayleigh Bliss and Caroline Hawkett, and took place on:

Wednesday 8 March 2017, Medway Campus, Sail and Colour Loft Building, Seminar Room 216, 1pm - 2pm

Friday 10 March 2017, Canterbury Campus, Marlowe Building, Lecture Theatre 2, 1pm - 2pm

The seminar will provide an overview of the adaptations applied at Kent Business School Medway as part of the Student Success Project. We will discuss the School’s approach to the project and the four overarching issues that have driven our work to date; Expectations, Non-attendance, Engagement and LTA practices.
We will provide further detail on the adaptations that have proven most successful – including the introduction of peer mentoring, student report cards and the pilot of an Academic Skills Development Week for stage one students. We will also discuss where activities haven’t had the desired impact and explore reasons for this.

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April

School of Psychology, Academic Advisor System Revised

We are delighted to confirm Dr Emma Alleyne will deliver a seminar focussing on recent changes to the Academic Advisor System in the School of Psychology on:

Wednesday 19 April 2017, Canterbury Campus, Keynes College, Lecture Theatre 4, 1pm - 2pm

Past implementation of the Academic Adviser System in the School of Psychology has resulted in limited engagement by staff and students. The purpose of this seminar is to introduce the new format taken within the School and present some of the early lessons learned and plans for future development. A KentPlayer recording of this seminar will be made available on our staff only pages for colleagues who are unable to attend.

 

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May

Kent Law School, Micro-affirmations

The Student Success Project is pleased to announce the fourth seminar will be conducted by Prof Toni Williams and will present an opportunity to learn more about micro-affirmation theory.

Micro-affirmation in theory and practice: a strategy for addressing educational attainment gaps or a misdirection of focus and effort?

Toni Williams, Kent Law School, g.a.williams@kent.ac.uk

This session surveys literature on micro-affirmation, which mostly focuses on its contribution to enhancing equality and inclusivity in the workplace, and considers whether the development of consciously micro-affirmatory practice in higher education has the potential to reduce established and persistent attainment gaps.

The seminar took place on:​

Wednesday 10 May 2017, Canterbury Campus, Woolf College, Seminar Room 6, 1pm - 2pm

A KentPlayer recording of this seminar will be made available on our staff only pages for colleagues who are unable to attend.

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© University of Kent

Student Success, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (01227) 816513

Last Updated: 27/09/2018