School of Anthropology & Conservation

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Rosie Pitfield

Microscopic markers of biorhythms in human juvenile hand tissue

Supervisor(s): Dr Patrick Mahoney (Main) and Dr Chris Deter

profile image for  Rosie Pitfield

Bodily growth is controlled by biological rhythms, some of which leave permanent markings in the internal structure of teeth. By comparing the age-related changes in bone microstructure to the markings retained in the teeth, information about the biorhythms control over growth can be obtained. In my PhD I intend to use histological methods to explore the link between biorhythms and the growth of bones and teeth in juveniles, and how an individual's particular biorhythm affects both their enamel development and their bone growth. This will further our understanding of modern human growth and its control.      

Prior to starting this project, I obtained a BSc in Biological Anthropology and an MSc by Research in Anthropology, both from the University of Kent. My Undergraduate dissertation focused on the sex differences in the distribution of osteoarthritis, and my Master’s research examined the microscopic changes within the humerus during the juvenile growth period.

 

 

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  • Mahoney, P., Miszkiewicz, J., Pitfield, R., Deter, C., and Gautelli-Steinberg, D. (2016). Enamel biorhythms of humans and great apes: the Havers-Halberg Oscillation hypothesis reconsidered. Journal of Anatomy. Early view.
  • Mahoney, P., Miszkiewicz, J., Pitfield, R., Schlecht, S., Deter, C., and Gautelli-Steinberg, D. (2016). Biorhythms, deciduous enamel thickness, and primary bone growth in modern human children: a test of the Havers-Halberg Oscillation hypothesis. Journal of Anatomy. 6: 919-928.
Thin section of a first molar (20x)

Thin section of a first molar (20x)

Thin section of a first molar under a polarising filter (20x)

Thin section of a first molar under a polarising filter (20x)

 

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Secondary osteons in a juvenile humerus (20x)

Thin section of a first molar under a polarising filter (20x)

Dora Harvey Memorial Research Scholarship.

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Last Updated: 28/11/2016