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Undergraduate Courses 2017

Film - BA (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

For over 30 years, Kent has been at the forefront of developing film as an academic subject. Our expertise means that you have a wide choice of areas to explore.

As a student, you become part of the community based within the School of Arts building – a creative hub for students of film, drama, media studies and art history.

Our degree programme

Our degree is flexible: you study film theory but you also have the option to explore film practice – for example, through developing the skills of a film critic or getting involved in creative film production.

In the first year, you cover the language of film (framing, sound, editing, performance, lighting), learn about the theory and the history of film, and can take a practical filmmaking module.

In your second and final years, you have a huge range of modules to choose from, covering everything from avant-garde to animation, with a variety of practice modules too, including screenwriting and documentary film.

Placement year

It is possible to take this degree with a placement year and gain valuable work experience. For details, see Film with a Placement Year.

Year abroad

You have the option to combine this degree with a year of working or studying abroad. For details, see Film with a Year Abroad.

Study resources

Facilities to support film theory include:

  • our own cinema, which screens ten to 15 films a week
  • 8,000 DVDs and videos in the library
  • individual and group viewing facilities in the library
  • an extensive collection of books and journals, including online resources.

Our film production facilities are industry-standard and include the following:

  • soundproofed production studio with projection, chroma-key green screen and black serge cycloramas
  • extensive lighting grid
  • sound-dubbing studio
  • individual edit suites equipped with Final Cut Pro
  • digital studio with post-production software.

Extra activities

The School of Arts puts on many special events, which you are welcome to attend. In previous years, these have included symposia, seminars, conferences and exhibitions, as well as visits by filmmakers and critics.

You also have the chance to take part in film-related student societies.

  • The Film Society at Kent is run by students and gives you a chance to get involved in film production, film journalism, educational activities and a film festival.
  • Kent Media Centre, run by student volunteers, produces KTV (Kent Television) – a TV station dedicated to student news and events across campus.

For trips to the cinema, we have the Gulbenkian Cinema on campus, which screens arthouse, independent, foreign language and blockbuster films. In Canterbury city centre, there is also the Curzon arts cinema and an Odeon.

Professional network

Film students become part of a wide professional network, thanks to our excellent links with other film bodies. These include:

  • Arts Council England
  • British Film Institute (BFI)
  • Independent Cinema Office
  • Screen Archive South East
  • Kent Film.

Think Kent video series

This talk by Dr Maurizio Cinquegrani, Director of Graduate Studies in the School of Arts, focuses on a group of documentaries filmed in Poland and portraying journeys of postmemory to the sites of Jewish life before the war and Jewish destruction during the Holocaust.

Independent rankings

Media and Film Studies at Kent was ranked 3rd in The Guardian University Guide 2017. In the National Student Survey 2016, Cinematics and Photography at Kent was ranked 11th for the quality of teaching.

For graduate prospects, Media and Film Studies at Kent was ranked 5th in The Guardian University Guide 2017.

Course structure

The course structure below gives a flavour of the modules that will be available to you and provides details of the content of this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

In addition to the Stage 1 modules listed below, you may also be able to select from:

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

FI313 - Film Style (30 credits)

The course introduces students to the language of film, from aspects of mise-en-scène (setting, performance, costumes, props, lighting, frame composition) to framing (camera movement, shot scale, lenses), sound (fidelity, volume, timbre) and editing (from requirements for spatial orientation through matches on action, eyeline matches and shot-reverse-shot structures to temporal manipulations through ellipsis and montage). The study of these elements enables students to understand the spatial and temporal construction of films, as well as the stylistic, expressive and/or dramatic functions of specific strategies.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI315 - Film Theory (30 credits)

This module approaches the "big questions" that have surrounded film and the moving image and puts them into historical context. Although specific topics will vary, representative topics may address competing definitions of film and its constitutive elements, the effects that cinema has on spectators, the social, cultural and political implications that moving images reproduce, and the status of the medium between art and entertainment. Students will debate seminal writings on the nature of film and bring their arguments to bear on exemplary film productions.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI316 - Film Histories (30 credits)

This course examines film history and historiography through a series of case studies. In carrying out this investigation students will be invited to work with secondary and primary sources held in the library and will be encouraged to evaluate the aesthetic, technological, economic, social and political histories presented in this module. Students will understand the role and value of the contextual study of film and will be given the opportunity to research and write on selected aspects of film historiography. The choice of case studies will depend upon the expertise of the module convenor and is not restricted to a particular national cinema or period; case studies may include, for instance, the history of film by means of the study of a particular theme and cultural context in the history of film.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

FI537 - Postwar European Cinema (30 credits)

This course investigates some major production and aesthetic trends of postwar European cinema. Students are introduced to a selection of European films as well as to the writings of key Continental filmmakers, theorists and critics.



Topics may include: the subjective realisms of the French New Wave and New German Cinema; cycles and trends in European genres, such as the horror film and the western; the aesthetic claims of Italian Neo-Realism and Dogme '95.



These movements will be examined for their claims to interpret the real world, their relationship to films in other national contexts, and also interrogated for the economic and artistic motivations behind their existence as critical categories.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI583 - Cinema and National Identity (30 credits)

This course examines the mechanisms and conditions that facilitate and enhance transnational cultural flows. We will study how filmmakers actively franchise, adopt and rework film styles and genres. A genre or style initiated in one country can be quickly adopted in another, with filmmakers tailoring the genre or style to the tastes of local audiences. We will both analyse some of the generic conventions that these films foreground and/or transform and isolate some of the national subtleties that are only discernible to local audiences. As the number of co-productions continues to rise, critics and viewers feel perplexed, and sometimes even amused, in their attempts to discern and identify the nationality of a film. We will critically assess whether any limitations exist embedded in such a co-production strategy, which blurs and obscures the specificities of each nation-state involved. Finally, we will explore whether the changing mediascape – one of transnational, multi-media corporate conglomerate involvement in film production.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI590 - Filmmaking: Improvisation for Screen (30 credits)

This interdisciplinary module brings Film and Drama Single Honours students together to explore improvisational techniques that increasingly animate both independent filmmaking and contemporary drama practice. Practical workshops provide technical instruction and creative focus on actors' improvisation as a rehearsal technique, a screenplay development technique, and a performance technique during filming. Exploration of improvisation as screen craft will be complemented by the theorisation of improvisation in lectures that also provide a historical context and introduce case studies of filmmakers’ use of improvisation techniques in devising and producing films. Connections between theatrical and cinematic trends that utilise forms of improvisation will be emphasised while student’s practical projects will respond to and expand upon these growing synergies between cinema and theatre in the digital age.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI594 - Film Authorship (30 credits)

This module will offer students the rare opportunity to examine in detail the work of a single director or a group of directors. It will thus enable students to acquire a more complex understanding of the issues at stake in the production, distribution, and reception of a specific body of film work. The module will also develop students' knowledge and understanding of the questions, theories and controversies, which have informed critical issues and theoretical debates on film authorship. It will thus appeal to students who wish to extend their skills in analysing film form, meaning, and practice in both a conceptual and a historical context. Furthermore, as the module will enable detailed consideration of what 'film directing’ is, as an artistic and cultural practice, in given contexts, it will be a very useful course to combine with the practical study of filmmaking.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI602 - Documentary Cinema (30 credits)

This module addresses a series of documentary films in their historical context and in relation to the different modes of non-fiction filmmaking. Documentary narrative techniques including the use of archival footage, staged reconstructions of past events, and talking-head interviews, are investigated by means of close textual analysis and through a comparative approach to diverse documentary films. This module also explores the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction and, while articulating a definition of documentary film, it studies film forms that present an interplay between the two, such as Mockumentaries and Essay Films.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI603 - Sound and Cinema (30 credits)

Cinema has typically been conceived of as an essentially visual phenomenon – films, it is often said, are essentially moving pictures. Sound has, nevertheless, played an important role from the beginnings of cinema, a fact which has been acknowledged in the detailed historical, theoretical and critical work on film music, and film sound more generally, produced over the last decade. Sound and Cinema will provide an overview of this new field of research, and aim to provide students with a clearer understanding of and greater sensitivity to the soundtrack. The course will begin by setting up an introductory framework for the understanding of sound, which considers the relationship between music and other aspects of film sound (dialogue, voice-over, effects), as well as the nature of the relationship between image and sound. Subsequent sessions will consider the evolution of sound technology and its impact on the aural aesthetics of film; the use of classical and popular music in film scores; the emergence of sound designers, such as Walter Murch and Alan Splet, in contemporary cinema; and the distinctive and innovative use of sound and music by such diverse directors as Wim Wenders, Jean-Luc Godard, David Lynch, and William Raban.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI606 - Avant-Garde and Experimental Cinema (30 credits)

This module examines types of cinematic practice whose principal labels have been 'experimental', ‘avant-garde’, ‘underground’ and ‘independent’ – terms which overlap but which are by no means synonymous. It is concerned with traditions of cinema which have, more or less self-consciously, formulated radically different aesthetics from those of the orthodox feature film, in which narrative is either radically reshaped, or displaced altogether by other concerns. Throughout, the course will juxtapose films deriving from the historical avant-garde movements (like the European avant-garde of the 20s, or the post-war American scene) along with contemporary exponents of related forms of filmmaking. The first part of the course provides a conceptual and historical overview of avant-garde filmmaking in the C20th; subsequent weeks focus on specific topics, for example collage, landscape, experimental narrative, and the interaction between film, video and the new media.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI607 - Storytelling and the Cinema (30 credits)

This module examines different forms of narrative and storytelling in cinema in order to place film narration within the tradition of the 'popular' arts. Understanding a film involves making sense not only of its story, its events and actions, but also of its storytelling, of the way in which we come to learn of these events and actions. This module examines the ways in which the specific means of representation of cinema transform a showing into a telling. It looks at theories of narrative in literature and film in relation to the different forms of narration and storytelling in cinema, focusing on questions of structure, reliability and temporality. The psychological and aesthetic role of narrative may be explored through a range of theories and analyses from within film studies and from other disciplines such as anthropology, literary studies, psychology and philosophy. The course will be taught through a series of case-studies using a wide range of films within American and world cinema.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI618 - Screenwriting: An Introduction (30 credits)

This module offers students an introduction to the terms, ideas and craft, involved in the creation of screenplays. Screenwriting is a unique form of writing with very different concerns from the novel, theatre and radio. Although the screenplay is a vital component of a film's success, it tends to be neglected as a separate art form.



In this module we explore the conventions of dramatic structure, new narrative forms and short film variations. Students are encouraged to think critically about screenplay writing and will have an opportunity to write their own screenplay. A selection of writing exercises have been designed to take them through the writing process; from preparation and initial concept to final draft.



The emphasis here will be on practical knowledge and support as student’s uncover their creative voice. This module does not aim to provide vocational training for students wishing to pursue careers in the feature film or television industries.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI626 - Mobile Filmmaking (30 credits)

Mobile filmmaking has fast become a cultural phenomenon that democratises film production and generates new audio-visual aesthetics. It has also triggered the establishment of festivals designed specifically to showcase films made on mobile devices. Consequently, mobile filmmaking is now an object of serious academic study. This module embraces mobile filmmaking in all these respects and encourages students to explore this accessible form of filmmaking with creative and critical rigour. Students will work either individually or in pairs to create a short fiction or documentary film on a mobile device. Alternatively, students can form a larger group to devise a web series for which each student makes an episode. Practical work will be contextualised in an essay that situates the student project in the field of mobile media. To facilitate this, lectures and screenings will explore narrative, experimental and documentary forms of mobile filmmaking in a way that encourages students to critically engage with issues of form and style germane to mobile digital media, the relationship between technology and creativity, as well as current and emerging platforms for the dissemination of creative work made on mobile devices.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Year abroad

Going abroad as part of your degree is an amazing experience and a chance to develop personally, academically and professionally.  You experience a different culture, gain a new academic perspective, establish international contacts and enhance your employability. 

All students within the Faculty of Humanities can apply to spend a term or year abroad as part of their degree at one of our partner universities in North America, Asia or Europe. You are expected to adhere to any progression requirements including achieving a merit at Stage 1 and Stage 2 to proceed to the term or year abroad. 

The term or year abroad is assessed on a pass/fail basis and will not count towards your final degree classification. Places and destination are subject to availability, language and degree programme. To find out more, please see Go Abroad.

Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

ART500 - Independent Project (30 credits)

On application, students may take this 30 Credit Year Long module. Admission is subject to approval of a project proposal. Proposals must be submitted to the Module Convenor by 07/04/2017. Within your proposal you must state a preferred supervisor with whom you should have consulted. The proposal form can be downloaded from the School of Arts website, see www.kent.ac.uk/arts/current-students/undergraduates.html and click on module availability. Alternatively you can request a copy at Jarman Reception. The Module Convenor will contact you in the summer term to confirm whether your proposal has been accepted. Students wanting to change into ART500 at a later stage maybe permitted to do so (subject to the suitability of the application and the availability of the supervisor) but should contact the Module Convenor and submit a proposal at the earliest opportunity. Proposals will not be accepted after 12/06/2017 unless there are exceptional circumstances, for which there is a separate procedure and timetable in September. If students wish to make an exceptional application for consideration in September, prior to the start of term, this needs to be submitted through the potential supervisor who will write an accompanying supporting statement. This would need to verify the proposal, confirm supervisory responsibility and endorse the student's ability to complete the project on time. Students should expect to undertake preliminary research over the summer and to see their supervisor before the summer vacation begins. Hence, late applications will only be accepted if supervisors are convinced that students are sufficiently prepared for the independent study and have already undertaken prior research. Applications for consideration as exceptional circumstances in September need to be submitted between 04/09/17 and 18/09/17. Students cannot transfer onto ART 500 after the start of term. For more information please speak to the Module Convenor at the School Fair."

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI585 - Film Criticism (30 credits)

This course introduces students to the history and theory of film criticism, emphasising the coexistence of different approaches to the analysis, evaluation and appreciation of film. The module will also have a practical aspect, offering students the opportunity to write critical pieces on the films screened for the class. In addition to traditional lectures and seminars, some sessions will be devoted to writing and to analysing fellow students' work. Participants will also be encouraged to reflect critically on different media of film criticism (newspapers, magazines, academic journals, the internet, television) and on the current state of film criticism.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI586 - Filmmaking: Documentary (30 credits)

Through technical exercises and presentation of film texts, students will engage with key aspects of non-fiction filmmaking. A series of practical projects will be contextualised through lectures drawing on a number of film texts, looking at examples from the history of the non-fiction film e.g. early cinema, direct cinema, cinema verité, and the film essay. The exercises are an opportunity for students to develop their creative practice. The development of a treatment / proposal leading to the production of final film project will use theory and critical analysis to develop students understanding of documentary practice.

Students will build on existing skills of collaboration (learnt on Exploring the Frame), improving competence in the planning, production and editing of practical, creative work. Students will develop an understanding of crucial aspects of non-fiction filmmaking -- in terms of both theory and practice -- and deepen their skills in the critical analysis of such texts. Students will build on existing skills of relating theory and practice, by analysing the implications (e.g. ideological, ethical) of their production decisions; the course will enhance student's ability to reflect self-critically on their own and other student’s practical work. Skills learnt on the module will contribute (along with Exploring the Frame and Introduction to Screenwriting) to the skills needed to progress to Moving Image Production.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI569 - Digital Domains (30 credits)

The module primarily focuses on contemporary digital filmmaking practices and film viewing. The first section of the module introduces trick cinema, special effects, the digital intermediate, and a range of computer generated images to explore the different opportunities these offer for manipulating space, constructing narratives and aesthetic innovation. The second section of the module more explicitly engages with a range of theoretical frameworks in order to think about how digital technologies alter our understanding of film, its relationships with other media, and the ways in which we participate in film culture.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI624 - Beyond Cinema (30 credits)

From the intimate viewing experience offered by mobile phones to the social interaction required by sing-a-long screenings, this module considers the changing nature of where, when and how audiences engage with film and the moving image. It considers the history of cinema-going, paying attention to the old and new sites of exhibition, especially those facilitated by new technologies. Connectedly, the module analyses the different modes of spectatorship, including audience participation and the desire to prolong or enhance the cinematic experience via extra-filmic activities, such as film-tourism. It also considers film's interaction with other arts and media—for example, its use within theatrical performances and its relationship with television. In doing so, this module reflects upon and reconsiders the definitions and limits of cinema and addresses the implications this has for the academic discipline 'Film Studies'.



As part of this course, students will have the opportunity to attend special screenings, participate in field trips and/or watch films unsupervised.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FI625 - Microbudget Filmmaking: Fiction (30 credits)

Students will engage with key aspects of microbudget filmmaking through technical exercises and the presentation of their own films. A series of practical projects will be contextualised through lectures drawing on a number of films, looking at examples from the history of the extremely low budget genres such as horror, crime, independent and experimental films. The exercises are an opportunity for students to develop their creative practice. The development of a screenplay for the final film project will use theory and critical analysis to develop students' understanding of microbudget filmmaking practice.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage

Teaching & Assessment

All modules involve lectures, small group seminars and film screenings (where relevant). On average, you have two lectures and three hours of seminars each week, plus four to six hours film viewing.

Depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays or dissertation), to a combination of examination and coursework.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • produce graduates with an informed, critical, analytical and creative approach to understanding film as cultural and aesthetic expressive media
  • develop students' creative, intellectual, analytical and research skills
  • develop existing and new areas of teaching in response to the advance of research and scholarship within the subject as well as new developments in film
  • widen participation in higher education among a diverse body of students
  • develop students' knowledge and skills in film studies
  • encourage students' critical, analytical and creative skills in relation to film study and, where undertaken, in relation to screen production
  • develop students' ability to think independently and flexibly
  • enhance awareness of, and sensitivity to, the contexts of production and consumption of film
  • develop students' interpersonal skills and interaction and their reflexiveness in individual and group work.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • the different genres and the diversity of film forms
  • the historical evolution of particular genres, aesthetic traditions and film forms
  • the ways in which critical and cultural theories and concepts have developed within particular contexts
  • the cultural and social contexts which affect the meaning of film works
  • aesthetic judgement 
  • conceptualisations of pleasure and identification in film
  • narrative processes in film
  • modes of representation at work in film
  • film conventions
  • the ways in which different social groups may relate to, engage with and interact with film works.

Intellectual skills

You gain the following intellectual abilities:

  • engage critically with major thinkers, debates, intellectual paradigms, and scholarly literature within the field
  • understand forms of film as they have emerged historically
  • examine the historical, social and cultural contexts of such forms
  • analyse closely, interpret, and undertake critical evaluation
  • critically reflect upon your own work
  • carry out various forms of research for essays, projects, creative productions or dissertations involving sustained independent enquiry
  • formulate apposite research questions and employ appropriate methods and resources to explore them
  • evaluate and draw upon the range of sources and the conceptual frameworks appropriate to research in a chosen area
  • draw and reflect upon the relevance and impact of your own cultural assumptions to the practice of research.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in the following:

  • analysing and interpreting sounds and images in time and space
  • understanding and knowledge of narrative and stylistic forms and structures in film and television
  • bringing together ideas from various sources of knowledge and different academic disciplines
  • articulating understanding of visual and oral media in a written medium
  • effectively deploying terms and concepts specific to the study of film and television
  • where practice modules are undertaken: producing work which demonstrates the effective manipulation of sound, image, performance and, where appropriate, the written word
  • utilising effectively relevant technical concepts and theories
  • producing work showing competence in the operational skills of screen production and post-production technologies
  • initiating, developing and realising distinctive and creative work through group collaboration
  • managing time, personnel and resources effectively
  • demonstrating an understanding of communicative strategies specific to film
  • producing work informed by, and contextualised within, relevant theoretical debates you have studied within the programme as a whole.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in the following:

  • working in flexible, creative and independent ways, showing self-discipline, including time-management and self-direction, sustaining focus and applying attention to detail
  • organising and managing supervised, self-directed projects and researching and evaluating sources in the process of carrying out independent study
  • communicating effectively and appropriately orally and in writing and, where undertaken, in other media
  • identifying issues and questions and gathering, organising and deploying knowledge and ideas to formulate cogent analysis and arguments, making subtle and discriminating comparisons and applying interpretive skills in diverse situations and contexts
  • working productively in a group, and displaying an ability, at different times to listen, contribute and lead effectively
  • showing insight in, and understanding of, the social and ethical issues surrounding contemporary communications, media, culture and society
  • information technology, such as word-processing, using the internet and, where undertaken, digital technology in relation to practice.

Careers

Graduate destinations

Recent graduates have gone on to work in areas such as:

  • film and TV production
  • arts organisations
  • media outlets (as film journalists)
  • film and TV archives
  • film marketing and distribution
  • university and school teaching
  • local government
  • business.

Our alumni include:

  • bestselling author and filmmaker Leon McCarron
  • feature film scriptwriter Mike Walden
  • film director Simon Savory.

Help finding a job

Kent School of Arts has an excellent reputation and many links to professional practices. This network is very useful to students when looking for work.

The University also has a friendly Careers and Employability Service which can give you advice on how to:

  • apply for jobs
  • write a good CV
  • perform well in interviews.

Career-enhancing skills

As well as gaining skills and knowledge in your subject area, you also learn the key transferable skills that are essential for all graduates. These include the ability to:

  • think critically 
  • communicate your ideas and opinions 
  • work independently.

You can also gain extra skills by signing up for one of our Kent Extra activities, such as learning a language or volunteering.

Independent rankings

For graduate prospects, Media and Film Studies at Kent was ranked 5th in The Guardian University Guide 2017.

According to Which? University (2017), the average starting salary for graduates of this degree is £15,000.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

ABB

Access to HE Diploma

The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall or 16 points at HL

International students

The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

University funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. See our funding page for more details. 

Government funding

You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

The Government has confirmed that EU students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year will still have access to student funding support for the duration of their course.

Scholarships

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. The scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our scholarships pages.

The scholarship is also extended to those who achieve AAB at A level (or specified equivalents) where one of the subjects is either Mathematics or a Modern Foreign Language. Please review the eligibility criteria.

Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources

Read our student profiles

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Fees

The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £9250 £16480

Fees for Year Abroad/Industry

As a guide only, UK/EU/International students on an approved year abroad for the full 2017/18 academic year pay an annual fee of £1,350 to Kent for that year. Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. 

Please note that for 2017/18 entrants the University will increase the standard year in industry fee for home/EU/international students to £1,350.

UK/EU fee paying students

The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

In accordance with changes announced by the UK Government, we are increasing our 2017/18 regulated full-time tuition fees for new and returning UK/EU fee paying undergraduates from £9,000 to £9,250. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise from £4,500 to £4,625. This was subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. This fee will ensure the continued provision of high-quality education.

For students continuing on this programme, fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

Key Information Sets


The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

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The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000

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