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Undergraduate Courses 2017

Psychology with Studies in Europe - BSc (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

Psychology is the study of people: how they think, act, react and interact. Psychologists scientifically study all kinds of behaviour and the thoughts, feelings and motivations underlying behaviour. By collecting information about what people do, think, perceive and feel, psychologists answer questions about human behaviour, cognition and development.

The Psychology programmes at Kent give you a broad background in practical applications, experimental and other methodologies, information technology and theory construction, and also allow you to follow specialist interests at Stage 3. All your work will help you to demonstrate transferable skills valued by employers. 

Psychology with Studies in Europe is a four-year programme. Students spend the first two years and the final year (Stages 1, 2 and 3) at Kent and the third year (Stage A) at a university in France, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Finland, Poland or Turkey.

Independent rankings

Psychology at Kent was ranked 12th in The Complete University Guide 2017. In the National Student Survey 2016, 93% of Psychology students were satisfied with the overall quality of their course.

For graduate prospects, Psychology at Kent was ranked 2nd in The Guardian University Guide 2017. Kent was 4th in the UK for the percentage of Psychology students who found professional jobs after graduation in 2015 (DLHE).

Course structure

The course structure below gives a flavour of the modules that will be available to you and provides details of the content of this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

In Stage 1 you take three compulsory Psychology modules: Introduction to Biological and General Psychology, Introduction to Social and Developmental Psychology, and Psychology Statistics and Practical. You also take modules in your chosen language (French, German, Italian or Spanish), or if you have registered to spend a year in Finland, Poland or Turkey you take modules in European politics and economics.

In Stage 2 you take five core Psychology modules required for professional recognition by the British Psychological Society, a double module in Study Skills, and further modules in your chosen language or in European politics and economics.

In Stage A (Year Abroad) you spend a year in university study at one of the School's Erasmus exchange partners.

In Stage 3 you carry out a research project in Psychology and take three further core Psychology modules. You also choose two optional modules in Psychology, allowing you to follow specialist interests and benefit from staff research expertise.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

SP300 - Psychology Statistics and Practical (30 credits)

This module consists of statistics and research methods lectures and workshops, as well as laboratory demonstrations. Assessment is by structured coursework, research report writing, statistics exercises, multiple choice and essay examinations. Meetings take place three times per week (consisting of combinations of lectures, workshops or laboratory demonstrations).

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SP301 - Introduction to Biological and General Psychology (30 credits)

Psychology is an increasingly popular discipline, possibly because of its relevance to the problems of everyday life. It is also a scientific discipline and draws on other areas of scientific investigation for its concepts and ideas, including Biology, Linguistics, Computer Science and Philosophy. The general aim of this module is to introduce students to the scientific study of behaviour, covering the basic approaches to the subject, including the Biological approach, the Cognitive approach, Behaviourism and Ethology, the Development perspective and related philosophical ideas. Rather than teach these topics in separate blocks, the module is organised so as to emphasise how the theoretical frameworks underlying these approaches relate and contrast. The module also shows how psychological theories and ideas can be used to account for both everyday and abnormal human behaviour.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SP302 - Introduction to Social and Developmental Psychology (30 credits)

This module, along with other Stage 1 psychology modules, provides a foundation for Stages 2 and 3. It will provide students with an introduction to the methods, techniques and issues involved in the study of social psychology. The emphasis of the module is on theory as the foundation of an empirical discipline and the importance of scientific methodology. It highlights the interplay between theory, research, and application in social psychology. Focus is placed on core theories and research in social psychology, developmental psychology, personality psychology, and applied psychology. The module is taught through lectures and skills workshops.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS300 - Learning Spanish 3 (Post A Level) (30 credits)

This module is intended for students who have attained the equivalent of an A-Level pass in Spanish. The main aims of the module are: to consolidate and expand knowledge of the grammar and structure of the language, and to promote a high level of skill in speaking, listening, reading and writing. The course also aims to increase your awareness of the history and culture of Spain through the study of appropriate texts. Regular written work will be required throughout the year.

Native/near-native speakers taking a four-year degree which includes Spanish will normally be exempt from this module. If you think you belong to this category, please choose an alternative module and contact Hispanic Studies as soon as possible at the beginning of term.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS302 - Intensive Learning Spanish 1 (Beginners) (30 credits)

This is an intensive module in Spanish for students who have no or very little knowledge of the language. It is also suitable for those who have taken a GCSE in Spanish, as by the end of the module the level attained will be higher than this (students wishing to proceed with Spanish in their second year will join a Post ‘A’ Level group). The emphasis in this module is on acquiring a sound knowledge of the structure of the language while developing the four main skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing.Please note that this is a very intensive module. If you have little language learning experience, you may find the pace too fast. The module is intended primarily as part of a two-year option for students needing to spend their third year in Spain. Regular written work will be required throughout the year.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FR300 - Learning French 3 (Post A Level) (30 credits)

This module covers level B1 of the CEFR in 24 weeks.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FR330 - French Language Levels A1-A2 Intensive (30 credits)

This is an intensive module for absolute beginners, Post-GCSE students and students who have not yet mastered level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). On successfully completing the module students will have mastered level A2. The emphasis in this course is on acquiring a sound knowledge of the structure of the language as well as basic vocabulary and cultural insights while developing the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE301 - Learning German 3 (Post A Level) (30 credits)

This module comprises: translation from German to English, grammar exercises, conversation classes, and the culture and politics of the German-speaking countries ('Landeskunde').

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE329 - Intensive Beginners German (30 credits)

This is a core module for students who study German to degree level but did not study it in secondary school. This module is very intensive as it brings students to the same level as those who have studied to A-Level. It may be taken as a wild module, with the understanding of the time commitment required. Students who cannot commit to the intensive nature of the module should take GE304 instead.



Students are taught all skills from levels A1, A2 and B1 of the CEFR. The students are taught basic and complex grammatical principles, use spoken German in everyday situations, do short compositions, and are introduced to German culture. Students are highly motivated and expected to progress rapidly from beginners' level to core competence in the areas outlined above, so that they may progress to the next level GE516 Learning German 3 (for stage 2 students) with confidence.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT301 - Learning Italian - Beginners (30 credits)

• This is an intensive module in Italian for students who have no or very little knowledge of the language.

• This course will be of particular interest to anyone wishing to widen their knowledge of Romance languages and to those intending to spend time in Italy.

• Key basic grammatical structures will be taught through the means of purpose-designed Italian language course books.

• The students will use the exercise book to carry out grammar exercises at home, which will then be corrected in class.

• The students will practice their aural skills by listening to audiotapes and videos both in and outside the class.

• Each chapter of the coursework book is theme based (travelling, shopping, family, etc.).

• The students will learn how to write and speak in Italian by acquiring new vocabulary, key grammatical points and by carrying out role-plays / presentations. All these aspects relate to the themes in the coursework book.

• A range of materials will be provided to the student and will for the basis for discussions, translations and applied exercises.

• Some cultural background of Italy will be provided (e.g. geography, art, music, culinary etc.)

• The students will also be expected to carry out simple translations from Italian to English / English to Italian. The texts provided will be extracted from the web or the coursework book itself. These translations will also relate to the themes covered in each chapter of the coursework book.

• By the end of the course the student will have covered key grammatical areas including: the present tense, the future, the gerund, and basic pronouns.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT308 - Learning Italian 3 (Post A Level) (30 credits)

The module is intended for students with an ‘A’ Level Italian (although Intermediate/GCSE/AS Level will be considered), and is aimed at consolidating students’ knowledge of written and spoken Italian, at strengthening their grammatical awareness of Italian and at practicing translation skills both from and into Italian. Students will develop skills to plan work, study independently and use relevant sources, as well as acquire a sophisticated knowledge of Italian through weekly exercises of translation, grammar and conversation. The module comprises three elements: one hour per week devoted to advanced Italian grammar, one devoted to translation from English into Italian and guided comprehension, and one hour of conversation practice with a native speaker Italian.



This module is subject to change, pending faculty approval.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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PO305 - International History and International Relations (15 credits)

This module introduces first year undergraduate students to some of the key historical events of modern history, and related debates and questions that have occupied the discipline of International Relations (IR). The focus is on communicating a few key themes, ideas, issues and principles that recur throughout the history of the last hundred years, and that cut across various theoretical approaches and different schools of thought. These key ideas include: war, conflict, violence and terror; international reformism; the nature of international order under conditions of anarchy; the balance of power; the influence of ideology on international affairs and on theorising; the tension between order and justice in the international sphere; and the nature of imperialism and its effects. Exploration of these themes, ideas, and issues emerges through analysis of the World Wars, the Cold War, decolonisation and the emergence of the US as the world's sole superpower in the post-Cold War era. The course places an emphasis on historical events between the global North and South, as these events often led to dramatic shifts and changes in international relations and foreign policy. Students will be encouraged to identify significant continuities and changes in international politics across the period studied.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PO310 - Introduction to International Politics (15 credits)

This module is addressed to students who have hitherto had no training in the academic field of International Relations. It aims to establish a good basis from which to appreciate at a higher level the theoretical schools of thought in the study of international relations, and to provide a strong grounding in the study of international politics as the basis for the further study in Stage 2 on the subject matter of the discipline of international relations. The course proceeds by examining a number of theoretical perspectives on International Relations and offers examples from history and current affairs to demonstrate the extent to which theories can be used to make sense of major issues in areas such as international security and international political economy.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PO314 - Introduction to Political Thought (15 credits)

This module introduces students to the study of political concepts that are central to thinking about political life. Through the study of these concepts students will be introduced to the principal ideas of many of the major figures in the history of Western political thought (for example, Plato, Hobbes, Rousseau and Marx) and to the work of many contemporary political theorists as well (John Rawls, Michael Sandel, Richard Rorty, Susan Okin and others). In addition, lectures and tutorials will familiarise students with a variety of different debates about how best to understand any given concept (such as, debates about what constitutes 'human nature') as well as how to understand the relationship between different concepts (such as, whether a just society must be an equal one or not). Moreover, the module is designed to allow students to develop a set of ‘conceptual tools’ with which to interrogate and shape the political world in which they find themselves; a world which is saturated everyday with competing articulations of the political concepts that we will study in this module. As such, students should come to develop a subtle appreciation of how the concepts examined on this module are, to greater or lesser degrees, intrinsic to all of their studies in politics and international relations (and related subjects).

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PO326 - Introduction to Political Science (15 credits)

This core module introduces students to the wide range of different methodologies commonly employed in political science. This includes the scientific method and both traditional and newer forms of research. Students will also be introduced to some of the fields of inquiry that dominate the study of politics, including public choice, social movements, political behaviour, economic development and democracy. The module integrates these two main components to create both an awareness of the breadth of political science and its approaches, ultimately providing students with the foundation for further study in political science. Substantive topics include: the nature of inquiry (questioning and determining what constitutes evidence), methods of comparison, theory and hypotheses. They will also be introduced to and explore quantitative methods, formal methods, experimental methods and empirical quantitative methods. Students will implement basic quantitative research techniques for themselves. Finally, they will be introduced to concepts such as equivalence, selection bias, spuriousness, value bias and ecological and individualist fallacy in order to illuminate the difficulties faced when making comparisons.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PO327 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (15 credits)

The module introduces students to the empirical study of the key structures, institutions and processes in political life. It does so through the lens of the comparative method, in which political systems are compared and contrasted to test hypotheses about the factors producing similarities and differences across countries and over time. The module first introduces the comparative method, and then discusses the different ways in which political systems can be organized and classified. It focuses on the three key powers in all political systems – executive, legislative and judicial – the ‘intermediate’ actors that link people to their governments, namely political parties, interest groups and the media, and how citizens behave politically in relations to such institutions and actors. Throughout the module, students are encouraged to identify the factors and the processes leading to different political outcomes across states and over time and to use both qualitative and quantitative data to support their arguments.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

SP619 - The Social Psychology of Groups (15 credits)

This module introduces you to the major orientations and discoveries in the social psychology of group processes. The material covers both behaviour within groups (e.g. group structure, social influence, leadership, and group performance) and behaviour between groups (e.g. intergroup conflict and cooperation, social categorisation and social identity, prejudice and its reduction). Basic mechanisms in groups that occupy the same position in the social structure in terms of power, status, and group size, as well as mechanisms that characterize asymmetric groups will be analyzed. There is a strong emphasis on social psychological theory being examined by systematic empirical research. Teaching will be by lectures and seminars with additional practical demonstrations from time to time.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP620 - The Social Psychology of the Individual (15 credits)

This module introduces you to the major theories and research in the social psychology of interpersonal behaviour. The emphasis throughout is on social cognition, and three main areas will be considered: social cognition and the self, attitudes (including attitude-behaviour relations, attitude change and persuasion), and interpersonal relationships. There will be a strong emphasis on social psychological theory and systematic empirical research in both field and laboratory settings. Teaching will be by lectures and seminars.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP500 - Psychology Statistics and Practical (30 credits)

The broad aims of the module are: (a) to provide a continued training in methodological skills appropriate to psychological investigation; (b) to provide advanced training in statistical techniques of the analysis of psychological data; (c) to provide training in computing skills for conducting analysis of psychological data; and (d) to provide direct experience of some of the phenomena encountered in other Stage 2/3 psychology modules. The practical component of the module consists of a structured programme of laboratory classes and non-laboratory sessions during which students work in small supervised groups designing and carrying out four research projects related to themes encountered in the department’s other Stage 2/3 modules. A programme of statistics lectures and computing workshops is closely linked to the practical classes. Computer–based statistical analysis is illustrated using SPSS, a general-purpose statistical package.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SP528 - Child Development (15 credits)

The focus of this module is on understanding how children develop, with particular emphasis on the historical background of this part of the discipline, and the key theories, explanations and research conducted within developmental psychology. Certainly, it would hardly be an exaggeration to say that for all of us, the period of our lives we go through described as ‘childhood’ has a significant influence on who we become as adults. Understanding something of the processes we all appear to go through is a central part of any psychology degree, and by the end of this module you should be in a much better position to understand the significance of child development for human psychology. As the course progresses we will move from issues germane to early infancy, then through early childhood and the associated social, cognitive and emotional changes the child experiences during that period, and then a detailed look at adolescence. An additional major component of the course examines how children acquire language and learn how to talk - possibly the most significant development of all.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP529 - Personality (15 credits)

The personality module examines different perspectives on the study of personality from Allport to the present day. The aim is to provide the student with a comparative and critical review of the major theories in personality and the research and findings that stem from them. Teaching will be by lectures and seminars.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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FR648 - French Language Level B2 (30 credits)

Three topics are covered each week: grammar, oral/aural skills, and written skills. Students will develop the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) to a level where they can confidently understand and convey information about themselves and their environment in all the tenses, and express their feelings and wishes in the conditional and subjunctive moods. They can account for and sustain views clearly by providing relevant explanations and arguments for and against particular points of view.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS504 - Learning Spanish 3B(Intensive Post A-Level) (30 credits)

This module is intended for students who have attained the equivalent of an 'A' Level pass in Spanish or who have taken LS302 Intensive Learning Spanish 1 (Beginners). The main aims of the module are to consolidate and expand knowledge of the grammar and structure of the language, and to promote a high level of skill in speaking, listening, reading and writing. A secondary aim is to increase awareness of the history and culture of Spain and Spanish America, through the study of appropriate texts. Regular written work will be required throughout the year.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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LS505 - Learning Spanish 4 (30 credits)

This module is intended for students who have attained a level of proficiency in Spanish equivalent to at least that of first year undergraduates. The main aim is to develop communicative skills with much of the emphasis being placed on speaking and listening but also involving a fair amount of writing. It will focus on the ability to operate in a variety of registers and respond adequately to different styles of discourse. There are four one-hour contact hours each week: two language seminars, one language lab class and one conversation class.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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PO566 - Europe and the World (15 credits)

This module focuses on European foreign policy, i.e. the ‘external dimension’ of European politics, exploring the relationship between Europe and the rest of the world. Following the creation of the European External Action Service (EEAS), the EU now stands poised to unleash significant foreign policy potential in its neighbourhood, and beyond. The difference between the EU and ‘Europe’ will be examined in component fashion through the foreign policies of some of the major European states.

Thereafter, the foreign policy tools of the EU will be looked at, after moving into an in-depth thematic treatment of the key foreign policy issues facing the EU vis-à-vis its security, defence, economic, trade and development relations, and its dynamics with ‘rising powers’, the US, its eastern and southern neighbours in Central Europe, Asia and North Africa.

Other issues include its burgeoning military capacity and a growing set of overseas military missions. Broader themes will include the impact of global developments on Europe, the international significance of European integration and the more general role of Europe in the new world order This course will draw on theories from political science and international relations and concepts defining Europe’s global role.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PO599 - European Security Co-operation (15 credits)

This module places the contemporary developments in European security integration within a historical context while focusing on institutional formation and the role of nation-states with the view to highlight continuities and changes constituted in the new Security Architecture. The module locates (Western) Europe’s place in international security vis-à-vis other actors including the United States and emerging powers in order to determine what type of security identity Europe has carved for itself in the post-War period. The module further considers the implications of cooperation for Europe’s ability to respond to external New Security Challenges.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PO611 - Politics of the European Union (15 credits)

The decision by a majority of the British electorate who voted on Thursday 23rd June 2016 to leave the EU sent shockwaves throughout Europe and the world and created a political earthquake within the UK's political system. Focusing on the European level, as this module does, the result of the referendum plunged the EU into its most serious existential crisis as, for the first time, a member state has signalled its desire to exit. According to Marine Le Pen, leader of France's Front National, the Brexit vote was 'by far the most important political event taking place in our continent since the fall of the Berlin Wall'. The reverberations of this decision will be felt for many years to come and affect an EU experiencing what some commentators have termed a 'polycrisis’ since the Euro-crisis erupted in Greece six years ago. As well as bailing out Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Cyprus and the economic fall-out from the global financial crisis of 2008-9, the EU has also witnessed the worst refugee crisis since the end of the Second World War, terrorist attacks in Paris and Brussels and heightened tension with Putin’s Russia over the ongoing conflicts in Ukraine and Syria. The EU has never been under such pressure and its resilience so tested. The purpose of this module in this context is thus two-fold. First, we learn and understand how the EU has reached where it is today, how its political system works, its strengths and weaknesses and how it is driven both the politics and economics of its member states and the global system. At the same time, we analyse the process of Brexit, how it will be managed by the UK and the EU27 and its implications for the future of the EU. There has certainly never been a more challenging or interesting time to learn about the EU!

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PO618 - East European Politics (15 credits)

The module examines the politics of transition and change in post-communist countries in their effort to establish new democratic regimes and find their place in the world. The module consists of three main parts.

Part I focuses on the experience and nature of communist rule, to develop basic understanding of communism as an ideal, political system, and a life style. Part II looks at transitions, examining regional patterns of change and relating them to the 3rd and 4th waves (coloured revolutions) of democratisation globally. Part III discusses the issues of post-communist politics in Europe, by way of exploring the forms and quality of democracy in the new states, considering the effect of EU enlargements on the new Member States and the EU neighbours; and discussing the future of communism in the world.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PO646 - Presidents, Parliaments and Democracy (15 credits)

This module introduces students to central debates about the influence of different executive formats on democratic government. The course examines the differences between and within presidential, parliamentary and semi-presidential constitutions and examines their consequences for the quality of democracy and for policy outcomes. The course initially focuses on identifying the key institutions and processes that shape the behaviour and strategies of politicians in the executive, before moving on to consider the consequences of these for governance, policy-making and democratic stability. Throughout the central focus is on understanding the extent and the ways that formal political institutions may shape how politicians respond to citizen preferences, bargain with each other to resolve political conflict and choose policies. Students will be exposed to different ways of thinking about the impact of political institutions on politics, different ways of conceptualizing and measuring democratic performance and encouraged to think about how a broad range of other factors may interact with constitutional formats to shape outcomes. The approach used will be broadly comparative and will use case-specific and cross-national evidence from both developed and less developed democracies in all regions of the world.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT508 - Learning Italian 2 (Intermediate) (30 credits)

This module has been planned as the natural follow-on for those who have recently, successfully taken a beginners Italian course such as IT301, and who should have covered the basics of grammar, acquired a stock of high frequency vocabulary and reached a degree of proficiency beyond GCSE and approaching A-level. (A2-B1 in terms of the Common European Framework of Reference {CEFR}).



At the same time the course is designed to prepare students for their third year studies and exams in Italy. IT508, like IT301, is an intensive course which requires serious commitment.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT563 - Learning Italian 4 (Advanced) (30 credits)

IT563 is an intermediate level module. Its aims are to strengthen and widen the linguistic knowledge in the Stage 1 IT308 module, to consolidate students’ vocabulary and improve their knowledge of written and spoken Italian through immersion in a variety of texts, and to practise translation skills both from and into Italian. IT563, like IT308, is an intensive course which requires serious commitment.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE507 - Learning German 4 (30 credits)

The module develops proficiency in writing, speaking and comprehending German. It concentrates on translation into German and English and the development of analytical skills in the production of written and spoken German. Translation exercises confront students with a variety of texts in different styles and registers, and encourage accuracy and critical reflection as well as acquisition and consolidation of grammatical structures. The language skills component combines vocabulary development with discursive writing on topics of relevance to the contemporary German-speaking world. Oral classes with a native speaker develop oral competence through discussion, enabling students to speak confidently and effectively at the intermediate level.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE516 - Advanced Intermediate German (30 credits)

This module comprises: translation from German to English, grammar exercises, conversation classes, and the culture and politics of the German-speaking countries ('Landeskunde').

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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Year abroad

Your third year is spent studying at one of our partner institutions in Germany (Jena, Würzburg), Belgium (Brussels), France (Clermont-Ferrand), Spain (Madrid), Turkey (Bogaziçi), Italy (Padova), Poland (Warsaw) or Finland (Helsinki). Exchange students in Poland, Finland and Turkey are taught in English.

Possible modules may include:

SP606 - Psychology Year Abroad Mark One (60 credits)

This year will be spent in university study at one of the School's Erasmus exchange partners. Helsinki/Warsa/Bogaziçi exchange students will be taught in English.

Students need to achieve a pass mark for all modules completed on the year abroad. Details on the means by which these marks contribute to the final degree classification are available from the European Studies/Erasmus Coordinator.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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SP607 - Psychology Year Abroad Mark Two (60 credits)

This year will be spent in university study at one of the School's Erasmus exchange partners. Helsinki/Warsa/Bogaziçi exchange students will be taught in English.

Students need to achieve a pass mark for all modules completed on the year abroad. Details on the means by which these marks contribute to the final degree classification are available from the European Studies/Erasmus Coordinator.

Credits: 60 credits (30 ECTS credits).

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Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

SP582 - Psychology Project (45 credits)

In Stage 3, students design and carry out an extended individual project under the supervision of a member of staff. Projects in almost any area of Psychology are possible, and the resources of the School of Psychology are available. The project counts as three modules, all of which are carried out in Stage 3. Students must pass the Psychology Project to obtain an Honours degree. Students failing the project can only obtain a Pass degree, which will not give them the Graduate Basis for Registration of the British Psychological Society.

Credits: 45 credits (22.5 ECTS credits).

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SP604 - Biological Psychology (15 credits)

This module focuses on the study of the biological bases of human behaviour, relating actions and experiences to genetics and physiology. It will cover topic areas including drug addiction, sleep, emotion, language, memory, and schizophrenia. The module will also discuss biological research methods such as brain imaging techniques (for example PET, fMRI, EEG), physiological recording, and the study of brain-damaged patients. The aim of the module is to enable students to reach a sufficient level of understanding of biological psychology to be capable of critically evaluating theory and method in published research.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP605 - Cognitive Psychology (15 credits)

The module gives students grounding in methods, techniques and issues of cognitive neuroscience. Focusing on vision, attention, memory, problem solving and language, the module examines how cognitive processes are instantiated in the human brain.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP633 - Applying Psychology (15 credits)

This module equips you with an understanding of what is meant by applied psychology, of the domains in which psychology can be applied (e.g., in business, education, law, health and the environment), and decision rules governing applied psychology such as the balance between the benefits of an intervention and the inherent cost and risks. It also introduces you to ethical, logistical, and methodological challenges in doing applied psychology and to the different theoretical perspectives underlying applied psychology derived from, for example, social, cognitive, evolutionary, developmental and forensic psychological theory.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP566 - Cognition in Action (15 credits)

This module tackles a variety of hot and/or critical topics in cognitive psychology, building upon the theories and research assimilated at Stages 1 and 2. The goal of the tutor or tutors, experts on their topics, is to bring you to a more advanced level, where you can start to evaluate pieces of research in terms of their findings, conceptual underpinnings and/or methodological choices. This year, the focus is on free will and metacognition, looking in particular at the extent to which we control, or feel we control, cognitive processes such as decision-making, attention, and memory. Practical applications and relevance to a general understanding of behaviour are emphasised throughout.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP580 - Advanced Developmental Psychology (15 credits)

The main purpose of this module is to critically review recent research into key topics within advanced developmental psychology. Examples include the development of the social self in childhood and adolescence, development of emotion, children as witnesses, gender development, and prejudice development and reduction in childhood and adolescence.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP642 - Culture and Psychology (15 credits)

This module explores how culture influences human experience including behaviour, thoughts, and emotions by providing a comprehensive introduction to general theories related to culture and diversity. It covers many topical areas in psychology such as the self, socialisation and development, and cognition from a cultural perspective and explores the methodology used by cultural psychologists. The module also aims to stimulate critical thinking and analytic skills generally, and to help you think about your own values and norms from a cultural perspective.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP608 - Motivation (15 credits)

This module provides an opportunity to study the literature on motivation, focussing on social-cognitive perspectives on human motivation. In this, we will consider In this, we will consider (a) What is experimental existential psychology?, (b) Does the unconscious exist? (c) The body, sex, and death, (d) drive, needs and motives, (e) intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, (f) personal goals, (g) achievement motivation, (h) The psychological function of religion, (i) The need to belong, (j) An existential perspective on close relationships, Theories addressed will include terror management theory, attachment theory, attribution theory, self-determination theory, control theory and self-regulation theory. Moreover, the module will introduce students to methods and measures applied in the field of research on human motivation. Finally, applications of theory and findings on human motivation to applied settings (e.g. educational or organisational settings) are discussed.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP611 - The Neuroscience of Cognitive Disorders (15 credits)

This module will build upon the cognitive theories and research methods explored in those modules taught at Stages 1 and 2. The central theme of the module will be to focus on distinct neuropsychological deficits acquired through stroke, such as hemi-spatial neglect, prosopagnosia, aphasia and amnesia. The idea will be to give students a grounding in how different strands of neuroscientific research - behavioural, cognitive, structural, physiological - have both advanced our understanding of neuropsychological disorders and informed on the design of relevant intervention strategies.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP616 - Language and Communication (15 credits)

This module will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the methods, techniques and issues involved in the study of language and communication. The emphasis of the module will be on theory as the foundation of an empirical discipline and the importance of scientific methodology. It will highlight the interplay between theory, research and application in the study of language and communication, focusing on core theories and research in this area. Example topics may include animal vs. human communication, bilingualism, developmental language disorders, the development of inner speech and conversation analysis.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP636 - Evaluating Evidence: Becoming a Smart Research Consumer (15 credits)

The module will systematically explore common logical and psychological barriers to understanding and critically analyzing empirical research. Major topics to be considered include common fallacies of deductive and inductive reasoning, judgmental heuristics relevant to evaluating empirical research claims, essentials of a scientific method, misleading statistical and graphical techniques, establishing genuine associations, the role of inferential statistics for identifying illusory associations, essentials of causal inference, and threats to the validity of experimental and non-experimental research.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP637 - Forensic Psychology: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives (15 credits)

This module offers an in-depth examination of theory and application of forensic psychology to the criminal justice system. It examines: law development; types of offending e.g. street gangs and factors associated with becoming criminal; police and forensic profilers’ responses to offending; eyewitness credibility and the police interview process; the credibility of juries; sentence construction for offenders; the aims of punishment and prisoners’ responses to imprisonment; theories of rehabilitation and the implementation of the sex offender treatment programme. The module considers the role of forensic psychology in identifying and ameliorating offending behaviour. It presents and critically evaluates research and methodologies within forensic psychology. You will be encouraged to critique the literature and methodologies to further your understanding of the core forensic issues the course presents.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP639 - Freud & Post-Freud (15 credits)

This module provides you with a critical introduction to Freudian and post-Freudian psychoanalytic psychology. It includes a critical evaluation of theory, method, and data in relation to fundamental concepts in psychoanalytic psychology (e.g. the unconscious, infantile sexuality). It also provides a critical introduction to Freudian and post-Freudian conceptualisations of specific clinical conditions (e.g. neurosis, depression, schizophrenia); of psychotherapy; and of social and cultural issues such as sexism and art.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP641 - Mental Health: Diagnosis, Interventions and Treatments (15 credits)

This module provides you with theoretical instruction and opportunities for critical evaluation in abnormal psychology. It examines the origins and identification of different forms of atypical cognitions and behaviours and investigates the psychological and social impact for patients. It covers some of the major mental health disorders, focusing primarily on what research has to say about their social/cognitive/biological bases and the implications they have for treatment. In addition, the module describes several methodological approaches and asks fundamental questions about the meaning of normality. The historical developments in this field are examined and current interventions and treatments feature highly in this module.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP643 - Psychology of Music (15 credits)

This module introduces you to a range of areas in the field of the psychology of music, including psychoacoustics and auditory perception, the development of musicality, the cognitive neuroscience of music and the relationship between music and emotion. The primary aim will be to describe and explain the different theoretical approaches and research methodologies employed in the psychology of music. Consideration of the ways in which we perform, listen to, engage with and learn about music allows us to address key issues in the areas of language processing, brain function, creativity, problem solving and memory. In addition the course examples contexts where the psychology of music has practical applications, for example in health psychology and in the media. It will facilitate an understanding of how the field of the psychology of music builds on and connects with the background knowledge of general psychology.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SP601 - Understanding People with Learning Disabilities (15 credits)

This module provides an introduction to important issues in learning disabilities and can be taken either as a stand-alone module or as a pre-requisite to SP602 Researching People with Learning Disabilities. It examines definitions and attitudes to people with, for example, Autism and Down’s Syndrome. It explores a number of particular difficulties that people with learning disabilities experience, including communicating and establishing social and sexual relationships, and some of the resultant problems, such as sexual abuse and challenging behaviour. Finally, the most recent social policy initiatives are considered with a focus on how services might implement policy objectives (such as social inclusion and adult protection).

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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Teaching & Assessment

Modules are taught by weekly lectures, workshops, small group seminars and project supervision. The Psychology Statistics and Practical modules include laboratory practical sessions, statistics classes, computing classes and lectures in statistics and methodology.

Most modules are assessed by examination and coursework in equal measure. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks and, where appropriate, the marks for your year abroad or placement count towards your final degree result.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • meet the needs of those contemplating a career in the psychological professions, as well as those motivated by an intellectual interest in psychology
  • attract candidates from a variety of educational backgrounds
  • provide an understanding of the principal perspective in psychology (for example, social, cognitive, and biological)
  • introduce students to a range of theoretical and methodological approaches
  • enable students to study chosen areas of psychology in depth
  • cover the foundations of psychology to provide entry into the British Psychological Society
  • provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and engages with work at the frontiers of knowledge
  • enable students to manage their own learning and carry out independent research
  • develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied within non-applied psychological and extra-psychological settings
  • develop skills appropriate for graduate employment, both in the psychology professions and other fields
  • extend students' knowledge and experience of psychology within the context of another University and country.

The French, German, Italian or Spanish tier of the programme aims to:

  • provide students with sufficient fluency in French, German, Italian or Spanish to  to study psychology at another European university.

The English tier of the programme aims to:

  • provide students with knowledge of Europe to enhance their studies at another European university.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • psychology statistics, practical experimentation and research
  • cognitive and social development
  • interpersonal and group behaviour
  • cognition and cognitive neuropsychology
  • personality and individual differences
  • philosophical and theoretical issues in psychology
  • the relationship between psychology and allied disciplines
  • different frameworks in psychology and levels of description and explanation
  • psychology in a European context 
  • linguistic expertise if taking the French, German, Italian or Spanish tier of the programme.

Intellectual skills

You develop intellectual skills in:

  • critical reflection
  • oral discussion
  • written analysis and interpretation
  • critical evaluation and exposition of ideas
  • development of writing and reading skills
  • time management and preparation
  • self-reflection and development, responding to feedback from different sources (for example staff and peers, information technology)
  • clarity in thinking, critical thinking, problem identification.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in:

  • conducting an empirical study, under supervision
  • the design and conduct of psychological research
  • evaluating and selecting frameworks and methodologies for exploring issues in psychology
  • using the major analytic techniques employed by psychologists
  • employing the inferential method of science (deductive methods, single case methods, semiotics)
  • psychological statistical methods and their interpretation
  • the use of psychology-oriented software applications (for example, database programmes, experiment generators, statistical packages)
  • disseminating psychological information to appropriate bodies.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in:

  • communication – how to organise information clearly; respond to written sources; present information orally; adapt style for different audiences; use images as a communication tool
  • numeracy – how to make sense of statistical materials; integrate numerical and non-numerical information; understand the limits and potentialities of arguments based on quantitative information
  • information technology – how to produce written documents; undertake online research; communicate using email; process information using databases
  • working with others – how to define and review the work of others; work co-operatively on group tasks; understand how groups function
  • improving own learning – how to explore personal strengths and weaknesses; time management; review your working environment (especially the student-staff relationship); develop specialist learning skills (for example by taking a foreign language); develop autonomy in learning
  • problem solving – how to identify and define problems; explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them.

Careers

Our students develop a broad range of transferable skills, such as excellent communication skills, both written and oral, the ability to work independently, to analyse and summarise complex material and to respond positively to challenges, all skills considered essential for graduate employment.

Our graduates have gone into areas such as local government administration, social welfare, the Home Office, the probation service, teaching, special needs work, the NHS and health charities, or on to postgraduate professional training courses, for example, in educational, occupational or clinical psychology.

Professional recognition

Accredited by the British Psychological Society as conferring eligibility for Graduate Membership with Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (provided you graduate with at least second class honours and pass your final-year research project). This is the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

AAB including French or German grade at B for some variants excluding General Studies and Critical Thinking

GCSE

Mathematics grade C, plus Italian/Spanish/Finnish/Polish/Turkish versions grade B or AS level in a modern European language other than English

Access to HE Diploma

The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall or 17 points at HL with Mathematics 4 at HL or SL and a relevant language A1/A2/B at 4/5/5 HL or SL A1/A2/B at 5/6/6 SL

International students

The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our funding opportunities for 2017 entry have not been finalised. However, details of our proposed funding opportunities for 2016 entry can be found on our funding page.  

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. Details of the scholarship for 2017 entry have not yet been finalised. However, for 2016 entry, the scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our scholarships pages. Please review the eligibility criteria on that page. 

Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources

Read our student profiles

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Fees

The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £9250 £16480

As a guide only, UK/EU/International students on an approved year abroad for the full 2017/18 academic year pay an annual fee of £1,350 to Kent for that year. Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. Please note that for 2017/18 entrants the University will increase the standard year in industry fee for home/EU/international students to £1,350.

The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

The University of Kent intends to increase its regulated full-time tuition fees for all Home and EU undergraduates starting in September 2017 from £9,000 to £9,250. This is subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise by 2.8%.

For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

Key Information Sets


The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

Publishing Office - © University of Kent

The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000