School of Anthropology & Conservation

Excellence in diversity Global in reach


Dr Noreen von Cramon-Taubadel

Senior Lecturer in Biological Anthropology

Programme Convenor BSc Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Medical Anthropology

profile image for Dr Noreen von Cramon-Taubadel

Dr Noreen von Cramon-Taubadel received her initial training in the natural sciences as a B.Sc. (Hons.) Zoology from the National University of Ireland, Galway (2002). Her interest in human evolution led to an M.Sc. in Human Evolution and Behaviour from University College London (2003) and a Ph.D. in Biological Anthropology from the University of Cambridge (2008).

Dr von Cramon-Taubadel's research interests encompass a range of topics within Evolutionary Anthropology. She has published on issues such as the analysis of past hominin dispersal, the nature of the transition to agriculture in Europe, comparative anatomy of the hominoids, geometric morphometrics and comparative shape analysis of Palaeolithic stone tools. The major focus of her current research is the microevolutionary analysis of craniometric variation within modern humans and the degree to which individual elements of the human cranium are impacted by neutral and selective evolutionary forces.

Further information about current research projects and funding can be found here.

back to top

Selected Publications:

von Cramon-Taubadel N., Stock JT. & Pinhasi R. (2013). Skull and limb morphology differentially track population history and environmental factors in the transition to agriculture in Europe. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 280: 20131337. 

von Cramon-Taubadel N. (2013). Evolutionary insights into global patterns of human cranial diversity: population history, climatic and dietary effects. Journal of Anthropological Sciences 91: 1-36.

von Cramon-Taubadel N. (2013). Congruence of cranial and genetic estimates of Old World primate phylogeny. Encyclopedia of Life Sciences. Wiley-Blackwell (in press). 

von Cramon-Taubadel N. & Smith HF. (2012). The relative congruence of cranial and genetic estimates of hominoid taxon relationships: implications for the reconstruction of hominin phylogeny. Journal of Human Evolution 62 (5): 640-653. 

Eriksson A, Betti L, Friend AD, Lycett SJ, Singarayer JS, von Cramon-Taubadel N, Valdes PJ, Balloux F. & Manica A. (2012). Late Pleistocene climate change and the global expansion of anatomically modern humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 109: 16089-16094. 

von Cramon-Taubadel N. (2011). Global human mandibular variation reflects differences in agricultural and hunter-gatherer subsistence strategies. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 108: 19546-19551. 

von Cramon-Taubadel N. (2011). The relative efficacy of functional and developmental cranial modules for reconstructing global human population history. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 146 (1): 83-93. 

von Cramon-Taubadel N. & Pinhasi R. (2011). Craniometric data support a mosaic model of demic and cultural Neolithic diffusion to outlying regions of Europe. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 278 (1720): 2874-2880.

von Cramon-Taubadel N. & Weaver TD. (2009). Insights from a quantitative genetic approach to human morphological evolution. Evolutionary Anthropology 18: 237-240. 

von Cramon-Taubadel N. (2009). Congruence of individual cranial bone morphology and neutral molecular affinity patterns in modern humans. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 140:205-215. 

Pinhasi R. & von Cramon-Taubadel N. (2009). Craniometric data supports demic diffusion model for the spread of agriculture into Europe. PLoS ONE 4(8): e6747

von Cramon-Taubadel N. (2009). Revisiting the homoiology hypothesis: The impact of phenotypic plasticity on the reconstruction of human population history from craniometric data. Journal of Human Evolution 57:179-190.

von Cramon-Taubadel N. & Lycett SJ. (2008). Human cranial variation fits iterative founder effect model with African origin. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 136: 108-113.

Full Publication List

back to top

Teaching

I am currently teaching on the following modules:

SE302 - Foundations of Biological Anthropology (Convenor)

SE533 - Project in Anthropological Science

SE567 - Methodology in Anthropological Science

SE570 - Current Issues in Evolutionary Anthropology

SE581 - Biological Anthropology: The Human Animal

SE593 - Evolution of Human Diversity (Convenor)

back to top

Lia Betti (PhD Anthropology 2009-2012) “Out of Africa and what happened next: exploring the origins of human pelvic shape variability.”

Anita Wan (Masters by Research) “Drivers of the demand for the ornamental trade of Amazonian discus fish (genus Symphysodon) between international markets.”

back to top

Links to Media coverage of my research:

Changes in diet and its effect on human mandibular shape

von Cramon-Taubadel N. (2011).  Global human mandibular variation reflects differences in agricultural and hunter-gatherer subsistence strategies. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 108: 19546-19551

Links to printed media: Nature Science  BBC  NewScientist  Telegraph  DailyMail  ABC  NPR  FoxNews  Cosmos  DiscoverMagazine

 

Transition to agriculture in Europe involved both demic and cultural diffusion

von Cramon-Taubadel N. & Pinhasi R. (2011). Craniometric data support a mosaic model of demic and cultural Neolithic diffusion to outlying regions of Europe. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 278 (1720): 2874-2880

Links to printed media: ScienceNews MaxiSciences

 

The influence of climate change on the expansion of modern humans out of Africa

Eriksson A, Betti L, Friend AD, Lycett SJ, Singarayer JS, von Cramon-Taubadel N., Valdes PJ, Balloux F. & Manica A. (in press). Late Pleistocene climate change and the global expansion of anatomically modern humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA.

Links to printed media: NewScientist  Phys.org

back to top

School of Anthropology and Conservation - © University of Kent

School of Anthropology and Conservation, Marlowe Building, The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NR, T: +44 (0)1227 827056

Last Updated: 19/11/2013