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Undergraduate Courses 2017

Italian and German - BA (Hons)

Canterbury

Overview

Italian and German enables you to learn the language and culture of both Italy and the German-speaking world.

Italy is a cornerstone in culture, art and history across Europe. By learning Italian, you give yourself a tool to explore this cultural richness and to open your eyes to its Roman heritage, the Renaissance, modern architecture, fashion and car design. Italian is spoken not only in its home country, but also by over 15 million people in Switzerland, North America and Australia.

German is one of Europe's most important languages for business and culture. Worldwide, it is the second-most widely used language on the internet (W3Techs 2014). Fluency in the German language, combined with knowledge of political and cultural developments in the German-speaking world, opens up career opportunities in many areas of Europe.

Studying at our Canterbury campus gives you a good opportunity to immerse yourself in both languages. There are many overseas students on campus, and our proximity to airports, the Channel ports and the Eurostar terminals at Ashford and Ebbsfleet make it quick and easy to get to mainland Europe.

Our facilities include multimedia laboratories, which offer a variety of interactive language learning programmes and dictionaries, and access to audio, video and computer-assisted language learning facilities.

Between Stages 2 and 3 of your degree, you spend a year studying or working abroad in a Italian or German-speaking country, usually six months in each country, where you can experience the cultures you have been studying first hand and improve your language skills.

Italian and German is therefore an ideal combination to enable you gain a broad cultural understanding and to embark on an international career.

Independent rankings

German at Kent was ranked 1st for research quality in The Complete University Guide 2017.

Italian at Kent was ranked 10th for teaching quality in The Times Good University Guide 2016 and 1st for research quality in The Complete University Guide 2017.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

IT312 - An Introduction to Italian Cinema: Neorealism and Its Legacy (15 credits)

This course will introduce the students to the work of some of the major Italian filmmakers who contributed to Neorealism's aesthetics and contents (Rossellini, De Sica, De Santis, Fellini) and those who have been inspired by them from the Fifties to the present. Through the study of the history of Italian cinema, students will become familiar with some of the most relevant issues of the history of Italian culture and society.



The course will focus particularly on some periods of the history of both Italian cinema and Italian society:

- The 1940s: Neorealism as a rejection of the fascist film industry ('Telefoni bianchi/White Telephones' and 'Calligrafi/Calligraphers') and as a way of representing Italian society in the years between the fall of fascism and the birth of the Italian Republic.

- The legacy of Neorealism in the Fifties: Fellini - the decline of Neorealism into the so-called Pink Neorealism during the years of 'Ricostruzione’ (Reconstruction) and the Cold War

- The legacy of Neorealism and its influence on Hollywood mainstream industry (with special focus on gangster films)

- The legacy of Neorealism on contemporary Italian cinema (e.g. Moretti, Sorrentino, Garrone).

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT315 - An Introduction to Italian Modernity (15 credits)

This module aims to introduce students to Italian Literature and Culture through the centuries (from the Unification to the late XX century). Its principal objective will be to set representative works of a number of key Italian writers and intellectuals, such as: D'Annunzio, Montale, Ungaretti, Pasolini, Levi, and the Futurists, in their socio-historical and cultural background.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT301 - Learning Italian - Beginners (30 credits)

• This is an intensive module in Italian for students who have no or very little knowledge of the language.

• This course will be of particular interest to anyone wishing to widen their knowledge of Romance languages and to those intending to spend time in Italy.

• Key basic grammatical structures will be taught through the means of purpose-designed Italian language course books.

• The students will use the exercise book to carry out grammar exercises at home, which will then be corrected in class.

• The students will practice their aural skills by listening to audiotapes and videos both in and outside the class.

• Each chapter of the coursework book is theme based (travelling, shopping, family, etc.).

• The students will learn how to write and speak in Italian by acquiring new vocabulary, key grammatical points and by carrying out role-plays / presentations. All these aspects relate to the themes in the coursework book.

• A range of materials will be provided to the student and will for the basis for discussions, translations and applied exercises.

• Some cultural background of Italy will be provided (e.g. geography, art, music, culinary etc.)

• The students will also be expected to carry out simple translations from Italian to English / English to Italian. The texts provided will be extracted from the web or the coursework book itself. These translations will also relate to the themes covered in each chapter of the coursework book.

• By the end of the course the student will have covered key grammatical areas including: the present tense, the future, the gerund, and basic pronouns.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT308 - Learning Italian 3 (Post A Level) (30 credits)

The module is intended for students with an ‘A’ Level Italian (although Intermediate/GCSE/AS Level will be considered), and is aimed at consolidating students’ knowledge of written and spoken Italian, at strengthening their grammatical awareness of Italian and at practicing translation skills both from and into Italian. Students will develop skills to plan work, study independently and use relevant sources, as well as acquire a sophisticated knowledge of Italian through weekly exercises of translation, grammar and conversation. The module comprises three elements: one hour per week devoted to advanced Italian grammar, one devoted to translation from English into Italian and guided comprehension, and one hour of conversation practice with a native speaker Italian.



This module is subject to change, pending faculty approval.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE301 - Learning German 3 (Post A Level) (30 credits)

This module comprises: translation from German to English, grammar exercises, conversation classes, and the culture and politics of the German-speaking countries ('Landeskunde').

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE329 - Intensive Beginners German (30 credits)

This is a core module for students who study German to degree level but did not study it in secondary school. This module is very intensive as it brings students to the same level as those who have studied to A-Level. It may be taken as a wild module, with the understanding of the time commitment required. Students who cannot commit to the intensive nature of the module should take GE304 instead.



Students are taught all skills from levels A1, A2 and B1 of the CEFR. The students are taught basic and complex grammatical principles, use spoken German in everyday situations, do short compositions, and are introduced to German culture. Students are highly motivated and expected to progress rapidly from beginners' level to core competence in the areas outlined above, so that they may progress to the next level GE516 Learning German 3 (for stage 2 students) with confidence.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE311 - Varieties of German Writing (15 credits)

This introduction to the modern period in German literature covers a variety of representative authors and works including lyric poetry, drama, the novella and short story. Texts are selected for their relevance, not only to the development of varieties of German writing, but also to the social and political development of the German-speaking territories during these seminal years. Literary movements discussed include the Sturm und Drang, Romanticism, Naturalism, Expressionism and political engagement in the interwar period. Political and social currents include the repression of free speech during the Vormärz, German Nationalism in the late nineteenth century, the Unification of Germany, the First World War and the rise of National Socialism.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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GE312 - Images of Germany, 1945-1990 (15 credits)

German cultural production since 1945 had been largely dominated by ideologies and politics, by the forced forty-year division into two republics in opposite camps in the Cold War, and by the legacy of National Socialism, which factors all contributed to the eruption of student unrest in the 1960s. The material studied on the module covers the problems of returning soldiers in 1945 and the hardships endured by the civilian population; the trauma of the Holocaust; the pioneering idealism in the foundational phase in the German Democratic Republic and a satirical take on that; the pain caused to ordinary individuals by the erection of the Berlin Wall; the significance of the Vietnam War to the Left in the 1960s and the turn to violence in the pursuit of political goals in the following decade; and concludes with a collection of post-unification short stories with little political import.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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GE326 - Introduction to German Literature (in translation) (15 credits)

This module is designed to introduce students with little or no knowledge of the German language to German-language literature and its development from the 1760s to 1933). All texts will be taught in English translation, and throughout the module students will be encouraged to consider the implications of literary translation and of studying translated texts. A variety of genres will be covered, including poetry, drama and narrative prose. Works will be analysed not only within their literary-historical but also their social and political context.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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GE328 - Post-1989 German Cinema (15 credits)

The fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989 led to fundamental cultural and political re-alignments in German-speaking countries, unleashing a wave of cultural comment and creative activity. The 1990s and early twenty-first century saw a revitalisation of the film scene in both Germany and Austria, evident not only in highly acclaimed niche productions but also in a series of international box-office hits. This module will explore the themes and styles of ‘post-Wende’ German-language cinema, focusing on representations of the GDR past and the phenomenon of ‘Ostalgie’; multiculturalism and migration; the transformation of Berlin and Vienna post-1989; and the documentary turn in German and Austrian film since 2000.



The films selected for study can also be made available with English subtitles.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

GE507 - Learning German 4 (30 credits)

The module develops proficiency in writing, speaking and comprehending German. It concentrates on translation into German and English and the development of analytical skills in the production of written and spoken German. Translation exercises confront students with a variety of texts in different styles and registers, and encourage accuracy and critical reflection as well as acquisition and consolidation of grammatical structures. The language skills component combines vocabulary development with discursive writing on topics of relevance to the contemporary German-speaking world. Oral classes with a native speaker develop oral competence through discussion, enabling students to speak confidently and effectively at the intermediate level.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE516 - Advanced Intermediate German (30 credits)

This module comprises: translation from German to English, grammar exercises, conversation classes, and the culture and politics of the German-speaking countries ('Landeskunde').

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE573 - The German Novelle (15 credits)

Students will learn to analyse literary texts and respond critically to a challenging body of work, with a particular emphasis on commentaries and close reading. Both their linguistic and their analytical skills will be developed through sustained exposure to a representative cross-section of one of the key genres in German literature, the Novella. The module will trace the emergence of the short prose narrative around 1800 and examine its adaptation during the nineteenth century, when realism asserted itself and became the subject of critical controversy. It will look at the major writers of the period to see what scope the development of realism offered them for artistic variation and psychological depth. Their works will be studied as reflections of the societies and regions to which they belonged and as indications of the profound political and economic changes occurring during the period.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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GE580 - German Extended Essay (15 credits)

Each extended essay will require a different programme of study, depending on the topic (chosen by the student in close consultation with the supervisor). Typically, the work will be divided into three periods: (1) gathering information and identifying the essay’s exact focus, (2) writing up individual chapters and discussing these with a supervisor, and (3) putting the extended essay into its final form and observing the conventions necessary for this type of work.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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GE584 - Order and Madness: Classical German Literature (15 credits)

This module examines a selection of essential texts drawn from the period from 1775 to the first years of the nineteenth century, in which German literature achieved European stature. It looks at innovation and newly emerging confidence in the treatment of the major literary forms (prose fiction, drama, lyric poetry). But it also studies the currents of violence, passion and madness which these forms were used to convey in an era defined by the iconoclasm of the Sturm und Drang movement and by revolutionary upheaval in France. We will look at the original angry young men of German literature (Werther, Die Räuber), dramas of love and betrayal (Faust), as well as prose fiction which retains its power to shock and puzzle even today (Kleist). The texts studied treat desire, problematic relationships of power and gender, and the crisis of individuals caught up in the painful birth of European modernity.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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GE587 - Life After Modernism? An Introduction to Postmodernist Literature in Ge (15 credits)

'Postmodernism', by definition, resists and obscures the idea of modernism and implies a complete knowledge of the modern which has been surpassed by a new age (Appignanesi, Garrat 1995, 4). With the advent of the digital age, our concepts and perception of literature and art, theory and economic history have changed dramatically and a new understanding of what reality is pervades all aspects of life. German literature after 1965 mirrors this development in multiple ways and authors have incorporated a multitude of postmodern aesthetic strategies in their writing processes and works, notably changing the character of German-language literature from a literature of crisis and "Vergangenheitsbewältigung" (coming to terms with the past) to a literature that, especially after 1990, addresses problems of self-representation, the hypermodernist 'loss of reality' and power-relations in the global context of the western world.

This module introduces a number texts representative of postmodern literature in German, and provides methods for the analysis of these heterogeneous texts and new forms of authorial self-representation, based on key theoretical texts like Roland Barthes’ "Death of the Author", “Text and Pleasure” or Michel Foucault’s “What is an Author” to outline principle changes of literary production and authorship after 1965.

Narrative techniques like pastiche, intertextuality, the deconstruction of textual coherence and ironic representations of ideological concepts by means of combining contradictory genres will be analysed and put into the socio-political context of German-speaking countries.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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GE589 - Wien-Berlin: Tales of Two Cities (15 credits)

This module focuses on the recent history of Vienna and Berlin, the cultural capitals of the German-speaking world. Many of the key events and movements that influenced Europe over the past century are intimately linked to these two cities, from the collapse of the Habsburg Empire, the development of extremist left- and right-wing parties in the interwar period to the division and re-uniting of Europe as embodied by the Berlin Wall. Changes and continuities in the political, social and physical topography of Vienna and Berlin will be traced by studying representations of both cities in a range of texts and films from the early twentieth to the early twenty-first century. Alongside feature films and prose genres such as short stories and reportage, the module will also consider theoretical texts on the city and the contribution of urban life to modern German-language culture. Central themes are the interplay of individual and collective, urban anonymity and liberation versus alienation and uniformity, multiculturalism and migration.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT563 - Learning Italian 4 (Advanced) (30 credits)

IT563 is an intermediate level module. Its aims are to strengthen and widen the linguistic knowledge in the Stage 1 IT308 module, to consolidate students’ vocabulary and improve their knowledge of written and spoken Italian through immersion in a variety of texts, and to practise translation skills both from and into Italian. IT563, like IT308, is an intensive course which requires serious commitment.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT508 - Learning Italian 2 (Intermediate) (30 credits)

This module has been planned as the natural follow-on for those who have recently, successfully taken a beginners Italian course such as IT301, and who should have covered the basics of grammar, acquired a stock of high frequency vocabulary and reached a degree of proficiency beyond GCSE and approaching A-level. (A2-B1 in terms of the Common European Framework of Reference {CEFR}).



At the same time the course is designed to prepare students for their third year studies and exams in Italy. IT508, like IT301, is an intensive course which requires serious commitment.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT542 - Italian Extended Essay (15 credits)

This will depend on the subject matter and the advice of the supervisor. The subject will be broadly within the field of Italian Studies.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT552 - Italian Short Story (15 credits)

This module focuses on a number of Italian contemporary short stories. More specifically, it discusses the literary treatment of love, and the love story, in the short stories of some of the most important Italian writers of the second half of the 20th century and early 21st century. Works by worldwide renowned authors such as Italo Calvino, Natalia Ginzburg, Cesare Pavese and Leonardo Sciascia, accomplished "postmodernist" writers belonging to a younger generation such as Antonio Tabucchi and Pier Vittorio Tondelli, as well as less celebrated authors such as Gianni Celati, Erri De Luca and Fabrizia Ramondino will be taken into consideration. While not underestimating the profound economic, social and political changes that Italy underwent during the last sixty years, particular emphasis will be given to the similar way in which all these writers seem to fictionally conceive of the love relationship as a missed encounter. In spite of the manifold forms of love being described in these texts (between husband and wife; wife and lover; young boy and ideal father; sister and brother; mother and daughter; two young men, etc.), all the short stories chronologically analysed in this module seem to rely on Calvino's provoking suggestion according to which the missed encounter is the "fundamental element" of love relationships.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT556 - Catching the Tide: Cultural Renewal in 20th Century Italy (15 credits)

Despite her incomparable heritage, Italy experienced for many centuries a sense of cultural provincialism, with the world's intellectual curiosity switching to Paris, London, New York and other centres of innovation. This module focuses on the clear connections between rapid socio-economic and socio-political change and the thrust for cultural modernity that made 20th century Italy once more a key contributor to the literary and visual arts in Europe and beyond. A wide variety of Italian "texts" of the first seventy years of the 20th century will be taken into consideration, including novels, plays, short stories and films.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT576 - The Make-Up: Representations of Gender in Contemporary Italy (15 credits)

This module introduces students to key concepts in the analysis of social, cultural and artistic representation of gender within the context of contemporary Italy (from Fascism to the present). It does so by considering a selection of relevant works from a variety of media, such as, for instance, neorealist and fantastic literature of the post-war years; feminist writings of the 1970s (e.g. Dacia Maraini's novel Donna in Guerra, 1975); contemporary cinema (e.g. Ferzan Ozpetek’s Le fate ignoranti, 2001; Donatella Maiorca’s Viola di mare, 2009). The module takes as its focus the gendered basis of social and political control as evident in constructions of subjectivity and sexuality exercised – for instance – through the media, while also analysing works that present themselves as a reaction to such control.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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Year abroad

The Year Abroad programme offers all students the opportunity to study abroad at one of our partner universities. It is also possible to work abroad, in a country where your chosen language is spoken, with many students opting to teach English.

The University of Kent has Erasmus agreements with several universities in Italy and in German-speaking countries. See Study Abroad A - Z countries and courses for the up to date list.

Possible modules may include:

LA514 - Year Abroad Module (120 credits)

Students either study at a relevant foreign university or work (either as teaching assistants or in some other approved capacity).

Credits: 120 credits (60 ECTS credits).

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Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

GE503 - Learning German 5 (30 credits)

The module develops advanced proficiency in writing, speaking and comprehending German. It concentrates on translation into German and English and the development of analytical skills in the production of written and spoken German. Translation exercises confront students with a variety of advanced texts in different styles and registers, and encourage accuracy and critical reflection as well as acquisition and consolidation of grammatical structures. The language skills component combines discursive writing on advanced topics with the development of proper oral competence through discussion. Conversation classes with a native speaker develop presentational ability, and enable students to speak fluently and idiomatically at the advanced level.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT506 - Learning Italian 5 (30 credits)

This module is designed primarily for final year students of Italian who have studied or worked in Italy. Familiarity with the language, as spoken and written at professional level –for example in journalism or literature - is expected, together with a well-stocked vocabulary, a reasonable command of idiom in common use and a sense of linguistic appropriateness to context.



Students engage in the following activities throughout the year:

• translation from Italian into English, using a range of registers and topics

• translation from English into Italian, using journalistic and literary texts

• study grammatical and lexical subtleties of the Italian language

• group discussion on specific topics

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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GE506 - German Dissertation (30 credits)

Each dissertation will require a different programme of study. Typically, the year will be divided into three periods: (1) gathering information,(2) writing up individual chapters and discussing these with a supervisor, and (3) putting the dissertation into its final form and observing the conventions necessary for this type of work.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

Read more

GE585 - Order and Madness: Classical German Literature (15 credits)

This module examines a selection of essential texts drawn from the period from 1775 to the first years of the nineteenth century, in which German literature achieved European stature. It looks at innovation and newly emerging confidence in the treatment of the major literary forms (prose fiction, drama, lyric poetry). But it also studies the currents of violence, passion and madness which these forms were used to convey in an era defined by the iconoclasm of the Sturm und Drang movement and by revolutionary upheaval in France. We will look at the original angry young men of German literature (Werther, Die Räuber), dramas of love and betrayal (Faust), as well as prose fiction which retains its power to shock and puzzle even today (Kleist). The texts studied treat desire, problematic relationships of power and gender, and the crisis of individuals caught up in the painful birth of European modernity.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

Read more

GE574 - The German Novelle (15 credits)

Students will learn to analyse literary texts and respond critically to a challenging body of work, with a particular emphasis on commentaries and close reading. Both their linguistic and their analytical skills will be developed through sustained exposure to a representative cross-section of one of the key genres in German literature, the Novella. The module will trace the emergence of the short prose narrative around 1800 and examine its adaptation during the nineteenth century, when realism asserted itself and became the subject of critical controversy. It will look at the major writers of the period to see what scope the development of realism offered them for artistic variation and psychological depth. Their works will be studied as reflections of the societies and regions to which they belonged and as indications of the profound political and economic changes occurring during the period.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

Read more

GE590 - Wien-Berlin. Tales of Two Cities (15 credits)

This module focuses on the recent history of Vienna and Berlin, the cultural capitals of the German-speaking world. Many of the key events and movements that influenced Europe over the past century are intimately linked to these two cities, from the collapse of the Habsburg Empire, the development of extremist left- and right-wing parties in the interwar period to the division and re-uniting of Europe as embodied by the Berlin Wall. Changes and continuities in the political, social and physical topography of Vienna and Berlin will be traced by studying representations of both cities in a range of texts and films from the early twentieth to the early twenty-first century. Alongside feature films and prose genres such as short stories and reportage, the module will also consider theoretical texts on the city and the contribution of urban life to modern German-language culture. Central themes are the interplay of individual and collective, urban anonymity and liberation versus alienation and uniformity, multiculturalism and migration.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

Read more

GE594 - Applied Language Skills-Writing in German in the Public & Professional (15 credits)

This module introduces students to the forms and varieties of modern written German through engagement with a wide variety of print and digital media. It explores the similarities and differences between different dimensions of German as it is used today, for example in the media, in teaching and in business. Students taking this module will examine the rhetorical patterns underlying all of these forms of communication, and will thereby improve their own language skills. Emphasis is placed on using a variety of resources (news media, websites, blogs) to build up a thorough awareness of the modern German language in context, and on encouraging students to work together in using up-to-date resources in producing German texts. In particular, the module aims to prepare students for their graduate life and for the uses of written German that will be expected of them on work placements, in their graduate jobs and in the German public sphere.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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GE588 - Life After Modernism? An Introduction to Postmodernist Literature in Ge (15 credits)

'Postmodernism', by definition, resists and obscures the idea of modernism and implies a complete knowledge of the modern which has been surpassed by a new age (Appignanesi, Garrat 1995, 4). With the advent of the digital age, our concepts and perception of literature and art, theory and economic history have changed dramatically and a new understanding of what reality is pervades all aspects of life. German literature after 1965 mirrors this development in multiple ways and authors have incorporated a multitude of postmodern aesthetic strategies in their writing processes and works, notably changing the character of German-language literature from a literature of crisis and "Vergangenheitsbewältigung" (coming to terms with the past) to a literature that, especially after 1990, addresses problems of self-representation, the hypermodernist 'loss of reality' and power-relations in the global context of the western world.

This module introduces a number texts representative of postmodern literature in German, and provides methods for the analysis of these heterogeneous texts and new forms of authorial self-representation, based on key theoretical texts like Roland Barthes' "Death of the Author", "Text and Pleasure" or Michel Foucault’s “What is an Author” to outline principle changes of literary production and authorship after 1965.

Narrative techniques like pastiche, intertextuality, the deconstruction of textual coherence and ironic representations of ideological concepts by means of combining contradictory genres will be analysed and put into the socio-political context of German-speaking countries.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SCL502 - Languages in the Classroom (30 credits)

The student will spend one half-day per week for ten weeks in a school. Students will work in a school, with a nominated teacher, for ten half days during the Spring Term and will have the opportunity to promote their subject in a variety of ways. The Course Convenor will place students in appropriate schools, either primary or secondary. They will observe sessions taught by their designated teacher and possibly other teachers. They will act to some extent in the role of a teaching assistant, by helping individual pupils who are having difficulties or by working with small groups. They may take 'hotspots': brief sessions with the whole class where they explain a language topic or talk about aspects of University life. They must keep a weekly journal reflecting on their activities at their designated school. The university sessions and weekly school work will complement each other. Therefore, attendance to university sessions is crucial as it will also give the students the opportunity to discuss aspects related to their weekly placement and receive guidance.



Some travel may be required by students taking this module. In this instance, it should be noted that the University is unable to cover the cost of any such journey.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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IT577 - Italian Regional Cinema (15 credits)

This course complicates the notion that there is a unifying concept of an Italian national cinema.

Specifically, it will examine particular instances of filmic production operating outside of the national and cinematic capital of Rome, examining both the factors determining and constraining the emergence of such filmmaking practices, and the ways in which the films they produce may differ from those produced in the capital and associated with an Italian national cinema.

To achieve this, the module will focus on a number of case studies, such as:

• The cinema of Naples, analysed in relation to the question of Neapolitan identity and cultural difference.

• The cinema of Turin, as a product of deliberate regional funding and cultural heritage strategies.

• The cinema of Sicily, seen in relation to the problematising of cultural stereotypes.

• How certain 'national' film productions have dealt with the problematic notion of Italian national/regional identity.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT572 - Modern Italian Poetry: Nature, Eroticism and Poetics (15 credits)

The course examines the work of four key Italian authors that in different ways prefigured or defined the 'modern shift' of Italian poetry: Giacomo Leopardi, Giovanni Pascoli, Gabriele D’Annunzio, and Eugenio Montale. In reading each of these authors, the module focuses on the following main issues: the relationship between subjectivity and otherness; the representation of nature, landscape, and space; different forms of eroticism; the notion of poetry itself and, finally the ways in which all these elements are interconnected not only within the analysed texts but also within the broader tapestry of the modern Italian poetic discourse. Texts to be studied include: Leopardi’s Canti; Pascoli’s Myricae and Canti di Castelvecchio; D’Annunzio’s Alcyone, Intermezzo di Rime and Poema Paradisiaco; Montale’s Ossi di Seppia

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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IT503 - Italian Dissertation (30 credits)

This module may only be taken provided that other Italian non-language units are being followed throughout the final year. The subject of the Essay will be agreed between the student and a supervisor appointed by the Section; it will normally arise from work done either in other Stage 2 and 3 modules or during the year abroad, but other topics are not necessarily excluded. It will be based on the student’s own research under the guidance of a supervisor.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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Teaching & Assessment

German

Teaching is by a combination of lectures and seminars. You have regular teaching and conversation sessions with German native speakers.

Assessment at Stage 1 is by 100% coursework (essays, class participation) in the first half of the year, and a 50:50 combination of coursework and examination in the second half of the year. At Stage 2/3, depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays or dissertation), to a combination of examination and coursework, in a ratio that will normally be 50:50, 70:30.

Italian

Teaching is by lectures and seminars. We have extensive technical facilities, including three satellite TV channels, video and DVDs and computer-assisted language learning.

Depending on the modules you select, assessment throughout all stages of the course varies from 100% coursework, to a combination of examination and coursework, in the ratio 50:50, 60:40, 70:30 or 80:20.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • provide a sound grounding in the German language in all its aspects, through extensive reading in German and through the use of German as spoken and written medium
  • immerse you in German-speaking culture by enabling you to spend one year in a German-speaking country or, usually, six months if you combine German with another language; In most cases you was an exchange student at one of our partner German universities or as a language assistant in a German or Austrian school or in one of several commercial companies with whom we have links 
  • develop a critical awareness of the factors that have influenced the contemporary society and culture of German-speaking Europe
  • increase your awareness of the development of the German language over the last few centuries
  • train you to translate from German into English and English into German
  • assist you in developing sound methodological approaches to the analysis of cultural, historical, social and linguistic phenomena
  • provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship
  • provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication, research and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector
  • develop general critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied in a wide range of situations
  • train you in the use of the internet as a resource and to assist you in mastering relevant aspects of information technology.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • German language
  • German literature from the 18th to the 21st century
  • German linguistics
  • German fiction (novel, novella and short story)
  • German cinema
  • German theatre
  • German youth culture
  • the role of German within Europe
  • German history.

Intellectual skills

You gain intellectual skills in how to:

  • apply the skills needed for academic study and enquiry
  • evaluate information critically
  • synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of the subject
  • utilise problem-solving skills
  • develop and maximise communication skills for the coherent expression and transfer of knowledge
  • analyse, evaluate and interpret a variety of evidence in a critical manner
  • study and reach conclusions independently
  • formulate original opinions in a self-critical manner on the basis of sound factual knowledge and from a balanced perspective.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in how to:

  • communicate effectively in German
  • develop reading speed in German
  • demonstrate detailed knowledge and effective understanding of the various structures and registers of the German language
  • translate accurately and efficiently from and into German
  • analyse critically a variety of texts of linguistic, historical and literary significance
  • work independently in a German speaking environment
  • develop skills in these three related areas: reception (listening and reading); production (speaking and writing); and mediation between at least two languages (translation and interpreting).

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in:

  • effective communication with a wide range of individuals using a variety of means
  • evaluating your own academic performance
  • accurate and effective note-taking and summarising skills
  • library and bibliographical research skills
  • use of the internet and other forms of information technology
  • techniques for using German language source materials
  • personal and professional learning and development
  • time management and prioritising
  • performing under pressure
  • a capacity for teamwork
  • leadership skills
  • working creatively and flexibly
  • a range of information technology skills.

Careers

Modern Languages at Kent offer work-related modules and work placements including the Languages in the Classroom module, designed for budding language teachers, which combines traditional learning methods with practical teaching experience.

In addition, we are able to offer two paid work placements at Fondazione CRT for students of Italian studies. The placements involve either teaching at the University of Turin or Fondazione CRT on projects including translation, research and correspondence with international organisations. 

Students of German have successfully completed work placements at a variety of different companies, including international giants such as Siemens and Bosch.  Not only do such well-known names look great on a CV, but the fact that you were using your language skills every day also makes this work experience even more impressive for employers in the UK, Europe and further afield. Other recent examples of internships include: the Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen in Mainz, a translation agency in Berlin, an oil company in Munich, and the German Bundestag (parliament).

There are numerous employment prospects open to languages graduates, and popular choices include teaching; translation and interpreting, working in international organisations and going into the Armed Forces.  Further study options include a PGCE, TEFL, a PhD or Master's in various aspects of German or Italian language and culture, or another subject altogether.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

BBB including B in German or Italian

Access to HE Diploma

The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall or 15 at HL, including German or Italian HL A1/A2/B at 4/5/5 or SL A1/A2/B at 5/6/6

International students

The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about our country-specific requirements.

Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways.

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our funding opportunities for 2017 entry have not been finalised. However, details of our proposed funding opportunities for 2016 entry can be found on our funding page.  

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. Details of the scholarship for 2017 entry have not yet been finalised. However, for 2016 entry, the scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our scholarships pages. Please review the eligibility criteria on that page. 

Enquire or order a prospectus

Resources

Read our student profiles

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Fees

The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £9250 £13810

As a guide only, UK/EU/International students on an approved year abroad for the full 2017/18 academic year pay an annual fee of £1,350 to Kent for that year. Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. Please note that for 2017/18 entrants the University will increase the standard year in industry fee for home/EU/international students to £1,350.

The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

The University of Kent intends to increase its regulated full-time tuition fees for all Home and EU undergraduates starting in September 2017 from £9,000 to £9,250. This is subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise by 2.8%.

For students continuing on this programme fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* If you are uncertain about your fee status please contact information@kent.ac.uk

Key Information Sets


The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

The University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in its publicity materials is fair and accurate and to provide educational services as described. However, the courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Full details of our terms and conditions can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/termsandconditions.

*Where fees are regulated (such as by the Department of Business Innovation and Skills or Research Council UK) they will be increased up to the allowable level.

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The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, T: +44 (0)1227 764000