Pharmacy

Pharmacy - MPharm

UCAS code B230

2018

Medway School of Pharmacy is a unique partnership between the University of Kent and the University of Greenwich. The School has achieved full accreditation from the General Pharmaceutical Council and is recognised as an established school of pharmacy.

Overview

The School’s mission is to produce, through innovative teaching and research delivered in a supportive and caring environment, high-quality professional graduates committed to lifelong learning.

The MPharm degree is a four-year programme based on three interlinked themes: practitioner and patient; medicines design and manufacture; and the patient, disease and drug action. Extensive use is made of tutorials, workshops and practical laboratory classes.

Throughout the programme, external placements are arranged at hospitals and community pharmacies

Graduates are required to undertake a pre-registration year in practice and pass a registration exam before they can register as a pharmacist in Great Britain.

Applying

When you are applying for Pharmacy - MPharm, please apply to the Medway School of Pharmacy, UCAS institution code name MEDSP, institution code M62.

Fees

For fees and other costs, please refer to the Medway School of Pharmacy website.

Independent rankings

In the National Student Survey 2016, 90% of Pharmacy and Pharmacology students at Kent were satisfied with the overall quality of their course.

For graduate prospects, Pharmacy at Kent was ranked 6th in The Times Good University Guide 2017.

Pharmacology and Pharmacy students who graduated from Kent in 2015 were the most successful in the UK at finding work or further study opportunities (DLHE).

Course structure

See the Medway School of Pharmacy website for further details about the structure of this course. 

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by lectures, seminars, workshops and practical laboratory classes, which take up approximately two thirds of the programme. Placements form a key part of the teaching programme.

A variety of assessment methods are used including practical dispensing examinations, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), presentations (individual and group), written reports, interim assessments and end-of-year written examinations.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • encourage personal and professional responsibility
  • educate students in aspects of the chemical and biological sciences that relate to medicines and health, providing both subject-specific knowledge and laboratory/clinical-based skills
  • provide students with an understanding of the design, development and use of safe and effective medicines
  • train students in the application of pharmaceutical knowledge for the benefit of patients by integrating information and critical evaluation
  • provide students with evidence-based, decision-making skills
  • allow students to develop independent learning skills that can form the basis for lifelong learning and continuing professional development
  • provide a thorough understanding of the law and ethics relating to pharmacy
  • allow students to develop a high level of interpersonal skills which are analytical, critically aware, evaluative, interpretive, empathic and reflective
  • produce graduates who can provide the optimal clinical use of medicines and promote public health.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding in the following three areas.

Substances used in medicines including:

  • sources and purification of substances, including radio-labelled pharmaceuticals
  • physico-chemical aspects of medicines and biological systems, including thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and an assessment of chemical and physical stability
  • analytical methods including principles, design, development, validation, application and good laboratory practice
  • the properties of medicinal substances and their relationship to molecular structure
  • the design of medicinal agents and approaches to their discovery
  • biotechnology products and excipients; pharmaceutical application of the technologies of genomics and proteomics.

Design and manufacture of medicines:

  • the properties of materials used for the delivery of biologically-active molecules
  • the principles of medicine formulation and systems for medicine delivery in the body
  • quality assurance and good pharmaceutical manufacturing practice
  • packaging and labelling requirements: purpose, design and evaluation
  • pharmacopoeial and regulatory requirements
  • stability of medicines; evaluation and control of biological, chemical and physical degradation
  • microbial contamination and its control
  • sterilisation processes and aseptic procedures
  • dressings, diagnostic systems, medical appliances and devices.

The actions and uses of medicines and other agents:

  • normal and abnormal bodily function: physiology; biochemistry; genetics; microbiology; nutrition; immunology; infective processes; pathology and pathophysiology
  • the actions of medicines within living systems: molecular; cellular; biological and physical aspects
  • absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of medicines, including routes of administration, concepts and mathematical modelling
  • aetiology and epidemiology of major diseases
  • the therapeutic uses of medicines in man, including adverse reactions to and interactions of medicines, and their significance in treatment
  • the recognition of disease states and the management of symptoms
  • the clinical evaluation of new medicines
  • drug and substance misuse
  • medicine delivery devices, wound management products and other medical devices (including diagnostic agents and devices)
  • complementary therapies.

Legal framework, ethics and health care provision:

  • the pharmacist's role in health care
  • managing medicines: dispensing; clinical pharmacy (including good clinical practice); responding to symptoms; prescribing; provision of medicine and patient information; reporting of adverse reactions to medicines; medicine utilisation review
  • measuring outcomes in support of evidence-based practice and achieving maximum clinical effectiveness
  • health screening and promotion, including diagnostic testing
  • the social and behavioural sciences relevant to pharmacy
  • health policy and economics, including particularly pharmacoeconomics and pharmacoepidemiology
  • the law relating to pharmacy and medicines
  • ethics of health care and its impact on relationships with patients and other healthcare professionals
  • the pharmacists' contribution to public health, which can be termed pharmaceutical public health
  • health services research methodology
  • the political, legislative and economic frameworks relevant to pharmacy
  • the analysis and management of risk.

Intellectual skills

You gain intellectual skills in the following areas:

  • the demonstration of knowledge and critical understanding of essential facts, concepts, principles and theories
  • the ability to apply the knowledge and understanding required to meet the needs of patients and other healthcare professionals
  • the ability to recognise and analyse problems and plan strategies for their solution
  • the critical evaluation, interpretation and synthesis of pharmaceutical information and data
  • the production of pharmacy-specific scientific documentation
  • the presentation of pharmaceutical science material and arguments clearly and correctly, in writing and orally, to both specialist and lay audiences
  • calculation of medicine doses and dosage regimens
  • the interpretation of patient and clinical data, including patient records held within practice settings
  • the ability to contribute to the development of health care through reflective practice, enquiry and innovation
  • the interpretation of prescriptions and other orders for medicines.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in the following areas:

  • the safe handling of chemical and pharmaceutical materials, taking into account their physical and chemical properties, including any specific hazards associated with their use
  • the ability to undertake risk assessments concerning pharmaceutical procedures and practices
  • the skills required for the conduct of standard pharmaceutical laboratory procedures
  • the planning, design and execution of self-directed and original research investigations, from the problem-recognition stage through to the evaluation of results and findings; the ability to select appropriate techniques and procedures
  • the operation of standard pharmaceutical instrumentation
  • the ability to evaluate and interpret data from laboratory and clinical observations, in terms of their significance and the underlying theory
  • preparation and presentation of medicines, by manufacture and extemporaneous dispensing, including sterile products
  •  skills in the analysis of medicines
  •  the ability to advise patients and others on the safe and effective use of medicines.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in the following areas:

  • interpersonal skills including written and oral communication skills, teamworking, and the ability to interact effectively with patients, the public and healthcare professionals
  • problem-solving, relating to qualitative and quantitative information, extending to situations where evaluations have to be made on the basis of limited information
  • numeracy and computation, including such aspects as error analysis, order-of-magnitude estimations, correct use of units and modes of data presentation
  • acquisition, transformation, interpretation and critical evaluation of data
  • information retrieval in relation to primary and secondary information sources, including online searches
  • information technology skills, including word processing, spreadsheet use, database use, archiving data and information, and internet communication
  • time-management and organisation; the ability to plan and implement efficient and effective modes of working
  • independent study skills as preparation for continuing professional development
  • an ethical attitude and approach
  • analysis and critical appraisal of published literature
  • application of general, biological and medical statistics
  • the ability to operate within a quality management framework
  • recognition of the need to work within personal limitations.

Careers

There are opportunities in all branches of the profession, including hospital, community, primary care, industry, armed services, prison services and academia. Flexible working is widely available.

Professional recognition

The programme has full accreditation from the General Pharmaceutical Council.

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications. Typical requirements are listed below. Students offering alternative qualifications should contact us for further advice. 

It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

New GCSE grades

If you’ve taken exams under the new GCSE grading system, please see our conversion table to convert your GCSE grades.

Qualification Typical offer/minimum requirement
A level

ABB including A level Chemistry grade B, and one of Biology, Mathematics or Physics 

GCSE

Mathematics and English at grade B or above.

Access to HE Diploma

The University will not necessarily make conditional offers to all Access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. 

If we make you an offer, you will need to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma)

The University will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF; OCR) on a case-by-case basis. Please contact us for further advice on your individual circumstances.

International Baccalaureate

32 points overall or 15 points at HL including Chemistry 5 at HL and one other science-based subject 5 at HL.

International students

The University welcomes applications from international students. Our international recruitment team can guide you on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about entry requirements for your country.

If you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes.

Meet our staff in your country

For more advice about applying to Kent, you can meet our staff at a range of international events.

English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of 'pre-sessional' courses in English for Academic Purposes. You attend these courses before starting your degree programme. 

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Funding

See the Medway School of Pharmacy website for details of funding opportunities. 

The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. 

Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.