Introduction to Hinduism & Buddhism - RSST3310

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Module delivery information

Location Term Level1 Credits (ECTS)2 Current Convenor3 2022 to 2023
Canterbury
Spring Term 4 15 (7.5) Leslie De Vries checkmark-circle

Overview

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, through a consideration of their key concepts, ideas, texts and practices (such as bhakti, moksha, yoga, dharma). The first half of the module will examine some of the most interesting features of the Vedic and post-Vedic tradition: the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita and the polytheism of the Mahabharata. The second half will examine the contrasting philosophical positions of the Theravada and Mahayana Buddhist traditions using materials from the Pali canon and several Sanskrit Sutras. Particular attention will be given to the variety of interpretations of the Buddhist 'No-self' doctrine and concept of enlightenment as well as the meaning and function of the Buddha’s career.

Details

Contact hours

Total Contact Hours: 20
Private Study Hours: 130
Total Study Hours: 150

Method of assessment

Main assessment methods
Essay 1 (2,000 words) – 50%
Essay 2 (2,000 words) – 50%

Reassessment methods
Reassessment Instrument: 100% Coursework

Indicative reading

The University is committed to ensuring that core reading materials are in accessible electronic format in line with the Kent Inclusive Practices. The most up to date reading list for each module can be found on the university's reading list pages: https://kent.rl.talis.com/index.html

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes. On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1 Demonstrate an appreciation of the richness and diversity present within specific Asian traditions and civilisation, encompassing topics such as the historical development of specific doctrines and groups, the relationship between belief, practice, and society, and the interpretation of particular religious texts and contexts;
2 Describe and articulate a key concept, idea, theme or practice relevant to Hindu traditions such as bhakti, moksha, yoga, dharma etc., demonstrating an accurate and detailed understanding of the idea in its doctrinal context, and an awareness of its place within the broader development of the tradition;
3 Describe and articulate a key concept, idea, theme or practice relevant to Buddhist traditions such as duhkha, anatman, bodhisattva etc., demonstrating an accurate and detailed understanding of the idea in its doctrinal context, and an awareness of its place within the broader development of the tradition.

The intended generic learning outcomes. On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

1 Demonstrate improved communication skills, both written and oral, as well as their ability to organise information in a clear and coherent fashion;
2 Demonstrate improved learning and performance by applying a variety of methodological and historiographical perspectives.

Notes

  1. Credit level 4. Certificate level module usually taken in the first stage of an undergraduate degree.
  2. ECTS credits are recognised throughout the EU and allow you to transfer credit easily from one university to another.
  3. The named convenor is the convenor for the current academic session.
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