Sport and Exercise Promotion - SPOR5670

Looking for a different module?

Module delivery information

Location Term Level1 Credits (ECTS)2 Current Convenor3 2021 to 2022
Canterbury
Combined Autumn and Spring Terms 5 30 (15) David Hooper checkmark-circle

Overview

The module starts by considering the multi-dimensional nature of health to broaden student's understanding of the many factors – individual or environmental - that could contribute to personal experience of health & what that means to different members of the population. Key aspects of sport and exercise promotion are considered, culminating in students completing a sport or exercise promotion event of their own. Whilst there is an emphasis on theoretical issues in the module, students are encouraged to apply these principles to the various aspects of sport and exercise promotion practice.

Introduction – What is health, sport and exercise?
Determinants of health, sport and exercise
Concepts and theories of health & health promotion
Health promoters & their roles
Sport development agencies and their roles
Guidelines for agencies involved in developmental work
Identifying population needs in relation to health & Sport needs
Motivation & behaviour change
The health and physical activity status of different population groups
Understanding and interpreting epidemiological research
Strategies for promoting sport and exercise participation amongst the population
Exercise guidelines for different population groups and the associated evidence, rationale, issues and implications
Sport and Exercise campaigns and the marketing of physical activity to different population groups, the influence of physical and social environments on engagement
Planning & evaluating a health, sport or exercise promotion activity

Details

Contact hours

Total contact hours: 42
Private study hours: 258
Total study hours: 300

Method of assessment

Evaluation – 50%-2000 words
Presentation – 30%-12 min Power Point Presentation
Event – 20%

Indicative reading

ACSM (2010) ACSM's Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription, 8th ed. Maryland: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
ACSM (2008) ACSM’s Health-Related Physical Fitness Assessment Manual, 2nd ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
ACSM (2010) ACSM’s Resource Manual for Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. 6th ed. Maryland: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Biddle, S.J.H. & Mutrie, N. (2006) Psychology of Physical Activity: Determinants, Well-Being and Interventions. 2nd ed. London: Routledge.
Heyward, V.H. (2006) Advanced Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription. 5th ed. Illinois: Human Kinetics.
Howley, E.T. & Franks, B.D. (2003) Health Fitness Instructor’s Handbook. 4th ed. Champaign, Illinois: Human Kinetics.

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes. On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

understand the principles underpinning sport and exercise promotion
describe and analyse data on the health and activity status of different population groups
describe the strategies and methods for promoting sport and exercise participation
evaluate the evidence and rationale supporting sport/exercise guidelines and interventions

The intended generic learning outcomes. On successfully completing the module students will be able to:

Communication and presentation skills - via the use of student lead practical sessions and presentations on a variety of subject specific material with both individual and group settings used.
Numeracy and Information Technology – evidenced via the preparation for presentations (including importing of graphics, word processing, internet searches)
Interactive group skills – evidenced through conducting student lead presentations and tasks as well as through undertaking group practical sessions.
Problem solving – achieved through the preparation and planning of the sport and exercise promotion event.
Ability to self-appraise and reflect on practice – evidenced within the evaluation section of the reflective nature of the coursework assignment.
Ability to plan and manage learning - through completing the extra self-directed study necessary to successfully complete the required assignments and tasks set during this module.

Notes

  1. Credit level 5. Intermediate level module usually taken in Stage 2 of an undergraduate degree.
  2. ECTS credits are recognised throughout the EU and allow you to transfer credit easily from one university to another.
  3. The named convenor is the convenor for the current academic session.
Back to top

University of Kent makes every effort to ensure that module information is accurate for the relevant academic session and to provide educational services as described. However, courses, services and other matters may be subject to change. Please read our full disclaimer.