Crime and Punishment in England, from 1750 to the Present Day - SOCI7060

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Module delivery information

Location Term Level1 Credits (ECTS)2 Current Convenor3 2022 to 2023
Medway
Spring Term 5 15 (7.5) Anne Logan checkmark-circle

Overview

The module is intended to increase awareness of continuity and change in patterns and perceptions of crime and the responses to it by the legal system and other agencies over the period from 1750 to the present day.

Students will study historical perspectives on the history of crime and punishment – Whig, Marxist, revisionist etc.

They will have a chance to undertake critical evaluation of the sources of crime history and learn about change and continuity in the criminal justice system over the period covered.

Details

Contact hours

Total contact hours: 22
Private study hours: 128
Total study hours: 150

Availability

Runs every Year

Method of assessment

Main assessment methods
Coursework - assignment 1 (1500 words) – 50%
Coursework - assignment 2 (1500 words) – 50%

Reassessment methods
100% coursework

Indicative reading

Emsley, Clive (2010) Crime and Society in England 1750-1900 (4th edition) Harlow: Longman
Godfrey and Lawrence (2014, second edition) Crime and Justice 1750-1900 London: Routledge
Gray, Drew D.(2016) Crime, Policing and Punishment in England, 1660-1914 London: Bloomsbury
Knepper, Paul (2016) Writing the History of Crime (Bloomsbury Academic

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes are as follows. On successfully completing the module students will be able to:
1.Demonstrate awareness of continuity and change in patterns and perceptions of crime and the responses to it by the legal system and other agencies over the period from 1750-1900 to the present day.
2.Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between the principles underlying criminal justice and the policies adopted by the state during the given period.
3.Demonstrate critical understanding of the origins and historical development of criminal justice policy and institutions.
4.Possess awareness of the role played by the voluntary sector, pressure groups and political influences in shaping official responses to crime.

The intended generic learning outcomes are as follows. On successfully completing the module students will be able to:
1.Demonstrate enhanced skills in communication and in critical evaluation.
2.Demonstrate enhanced research skills
3.Successfully apply critical judgement to problems and debates through written assignments and seminar work
4.Independently obtain a range of suitable library and web-based resources for second year study and use available evidence to construct an argument
5.Evaluate and analyse different forms of data, including statistics

Notes

  1. Credit level 5. Intermediate level module usually taken in Stage 2 of an undergraduate degree.
  2. ECTS credits are recognised throughout the EU and allow you to transfer credit easily from one university to another.
  3. The named convenor is the convenor for the current academic session.
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