Values, Ethics and Diversity - SO314

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2017-18 2018-19
Medway
(version 2)
Autumn
View Timetable
4 15 (7.5) DR E Skoura-Kirk

Pre-requisites

None

Restrictions

None

2017-18

Overview

The module will encourage students to develop their capacities to respect and promote each person as an individual, the independence and quality of life of individuals whilst protecting them from harm, and the dignity and privacy of individuals, families, carers, groups and communities. During the module students will also examine the importance of recognising and facilitating the use of language and form of communication of each person’s choice and value, and recognising and respecting the diversity, expertise and experience of individuals, families, carers, groups and communities. They will explore how to maintain the trust and confidence of individuals, families, carers, groups and communities by communicating in an open, accurate and understandable way, and discuss strategies to challenge discrimination, disadvantage and other forms of inequality and injustice.

The module will cover the nature, historical evolution and application of social work values, the concept of professionalism and the role of codes of practice and ethics, and the moral concepts of human rights, responsibility, freedom, authority and power inherent in the practice of social workers as moral and statutory agents. Students will be introduced to the complex relationships between justice, care and control in social welfare and the practical and ethical implications of these, including social workers’ roles as statutory agents and in upholding the law. They will consider aspects of philosophical ethics relevant to the understanding and resolution of value dilemmas and conflicts in both inter-personal and professional contexts. The importance of recognising key dimensions of social difference and sources of inequality – class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, age and disability – in delivering ethical social work practice will also be a key focus of the module.

Method of assessment

The assessment for this module comprises two elements:

• An essay of 2,500 words, constituting 70% of the module assessment. The essay will give students the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of the range of value, ethics and diversity issues involved in social work. The essay will also allow students to reflect on their own values, prejudices, ethical dilemmas, and conflicts testing LOs.

• A presentation. Students will give a presentation in small groups with a focus on key ethical issues in practice. The presentation will link practice issues with the theoretical material covered in the module, count for 30% of the final assessment, and test LOs.

Preliminary reading

Banks, S. (2012) Ethics and Values in Social Work 4th edn. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Bhatti-Sinclair, K. (2011) Anti-Racist Practice in Social Work. Basingstoke: Palgrave

Gaine, C. (ed) (2010) Equality and Diversity in Social Work Practice. Exeter: Learning Matters.

Gray, M. and Webb, S. A. (2010) Ethics and Value Perspectives in Social Work. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

O’ Sullivan, T. (2011) Decision Making in Social Work. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Thompson, N. (2011) Promoting Equality Working with Diversity and Difference (3rd ed). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

The assessment for this module comprises two elements:

• An essay of 2,500 words, constituting 70% of the module assessment. The essay will give students the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of the range of value, ethics and diversity issues involved in social work. The essay will also allow students to reflect on their own values, prejudices, ethical dilemmas, and conflicts testing LOs.

• A presentation. Students will give a presentation in small groups with a focus on key ethical issues in practice. The presentation will link practice issues with the theoretical material covered in the module, count for 30% of the final assessment, and test LOs.

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