Global Governance and International Organisation - PO935

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2017-18 2018-19
Brussels
(version 2)
Spring
View Timetable
7 20 (10)

Pre-requisites

None

Restrictions

None

2017-18

Overview

The aim of this course is to achieve an analytical understanding of global governance and international organizations. More specifically, the course aims to deepen the students':

- contextual understanding of the history of international organizations;
- understanding of theories explaining actor behavior and policy outcomes in the context of international organizations and global governance;
- analytical and practical understanding of various global governance fora and policies;
- understanding of philosophical and normative accounts of global governance;
- understanding of strategies, norms and interests that drive the states and non-governmental actors in various global governance fora and policy areas (e.g. the United Nations, the WTO, the G7/G8/G20, global security governance, global economic governance, global development cooperation, etc.)

Details

This module appears in:


Availability

Spring Term

Method of assessment

Formative assessment of the contributions to the seminar will be given throughout the module in the form of oral feedback. Summative assessment of the module will be based on the following:
1. Essay: one essay of approximately 3000 words from a list as specified by the Lecturer (50% of the final mark).
2. Exam: a 2 hour closed book examination covering the entire course. Students will have a choice of questions (50% of the final mark).

Preliminary reading

Weiss, Thomas and R. Wilkinson (eds.). International Organization and Global Governance, Routledge, London 2014
Mazower, Mark. Governing the World: The History of an Idea, Penguin 2012
Rosenau, James N. and Czempiel, Ernst-Otto (eds.) Governance without Government: Order and Change in World Politics. Cambridge, 1992
Mattli, Walter and Woods, Ngaire (eds.), The Politics of Global Regulation. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009
Habermas, Jürgen, The Divided West, Cambridge University Press, 2006
Levi-Faur, David (ed.). Oxford Handbook of Governance, Oxford University Press, 2012

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes
On successful completion of the module, students will be able to
SLO1: appreciate the different levels of analysis – international, domestic, regional, transnational – at which global policy is formulated; understand the different mechanisms of interest creation, articulation, and implementation at those different levels; and understand the relationship and interplay between them in the formulation of global policy
SLO2: summarise and critically assess the dominant theories of policy making, from the local to the global.
SLO3: understand and evaluate the relative merits of different approaches to global policy making in multilateral diplomacy, including the opportunities and limitations of each approach.
SLO4: understand and analyse the emergence and development of global institutions and especially the United Nations system
SLO5: assess the role of different actors in the policy process – civil society, governmental, inter-governmental organisations -, in particular the actors involved in the UN system;
SLO6: apply theoretical perspectives to case studies in global governance
SLO7: identify the practical and ethical problems and limits of international law, state sovereignty, and international justice with regard to key state and non-state practices in a global context

These specific learning outcomes contribute to achieving the learning outcomes of the MA in International Relations by demonstrating:

1. Advanced knowledge and understanding of:
1.1 historical and theoretical issues at the forefront of the discipline of international relations, together with familiarity with appropriate bibliographical sources; (SLO 2,4,6)
1.2 the epistemological and methodological principles in their application to the study of international relations; (SLO 1,3,6)
1.3 key ontological, theoretical, and methodological problems of international relations; (SLO 1,3,5,6,7)
1.4 current challenges to international order, cooperation, identity, social formations, and global issues, and possible strategies to address them; (SLO 1,4,5,7)
1.5 the changing role of the state in the context of globalisation and regional integration and the implications for international peace and security; (SLO 1,3,5,7)
1.6 how to carry out an independent research project and write in a scholarly manner demonstrating familiarity with academic conventions deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly. (SLO 1,2,6)

2. Intellectual skills:
1.1 general research skills, especially bibliographic and computing skills; (SLO 2,4,5,6)
1.2 gather, organize and deploy evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and some primary sources; (SLO 2,4,5)
1.3 identify, investigate, analyse, formulate and advocate solutions to problems; (SLO 7)
1.4 develop reasoned arguments, synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement, (SLO 2,3)
1.5 reflect on, and manage, their own learning and seek to make use of constructive feedback from peers and staff to enhance their performance and personal skills, manage their own learning self-critically (SLO 7)

3. Subject-specific skills:
3.1 applying concepts, theories and methods used in the study of international relations, the analysis of political events, ideas, institutions and practices; (SLO 6)
3.2 evaluating different interpretations of political issues and events; (SLO 2,3)
3.3 describing, evaluating and applying different approaches to collecting, analysing and presenting political information; (SLO 3)
3.4 developing a good understanding of the main epistemological issues relative to research in the social sciences, including some major theoretical and epistemological debates in the social sciences, such as explanation of and understanding the differences between positivist, realist and other accounts of social science and the practical implications of the major alternative philosophical positions in the social sciences for research; (SLO 2,6)

4. Transferable skills:
4.1 Communication: communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing (including, where appropriate, the use of IT); organise information clearly and coherently; use communication and information technology for the retrieval and presentation of information, including, where appropriate, statistical or numerical information; (SLO 2,3,4,5)

The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes
Students who successfully complete this module
GLO1: will be able to work with theoretical knowledge and apply theory to practical issues
GLO2: will be aware of the ethical dimensions of the scholarly work done in their discipline in general as well as in their own work
GLO3: will be able to undertake analysis of complex, incomplete or contradictory areas of knowledge and make carefully constructed arguments
GLO4: will have a level of conceptual understanding that will allow them to evaluate research, policies, and practices critically
GLO5: will be reflective and self-critical in their work
GLO6: will be able to use the internet, bibliographic search engines, online resources, and effectively conduct research
GLO7: will be able to engage in academic and professional communication with others
GLO8: will have independent learning ability required for further study or professional work

By helping students to progress towards these generic learning outcomes, the module contributes to achieving the general aims of the MA in international Relations, which aim to:

1. Advanced knowledge and understanding of:
1.1 historical and theoretical issues at the forefront of the discipline of international relations, together with familiarity with appropriate bibliographical sources; (GLO 1,6)
1.2 the epistemological and methodological principles in their application to the study of international relations; (GLO 3)
1.3 key ontological, theoretical, and methodological problems of international relations; (GLO 1,3,4)
1.4 current challenges to international order, cooperation, identity, social formations, and global issues, and possible strategies to address them; (GLO 3)
1.5 the changing role of the state in the context of globalisation and regional integration and the implications for international peace and security; (GLO 3,4)
1.6 how to carry out an independent research project and write in a scholarly manner demonstrating familiarity with academic conventions deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly. (GLO 3,7,8)

2. Intellectual skills:
2.1 general research skills, especially bibliographic and computing skills; (GLO 3,6,8)
2.2 gather, organize and deploy evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and some primary sources; (GLO 7)
2.3 identify, investigate, analyse, formulate and advocate solutions to problems; (GLO 3,5)
2.4 develop reasoned arguments, synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement, (GLO 3,5,7)
2.5 reflect on, and manage, their own learning and seek to make use of constructive feedback from peers and staff to enhance their performance and personal skills, manage their own learning self-critically (GLO 5)

3. Subject-specific skills:
3.1 applying concepts, theories and methods used in the study of international relations, the analysis of political events, ideas, institutions and practices; (GLO 1)
3.2 evaluating different interpretations of political issues and events; (GLO 3)
3.3 describing, evaluating and applying different approaches to collecting, analysing and presenting political information; (GLO 1,3,4)
3.4 developing a good understanding of the main epistemological issues relative to research in the social sciences, including some major theoretical and epistemological debates in the social sciences, such as explanation of and understanding the differences between positivist, realist and other accounts of social science and the practical implications of the major alternative philosophical positions in the social sciences for research; (GLO 1,2,4)

4. Transferable skills:
4.1 Communication: communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing (including, where appropriate, the use of IT); organise information clearly and coherently; use communication and information technology for the retrieval and presentation of information, including, where appropriate, statistical or numerical information; (GLO 7)
4.2 Information technology: produce written documents; undertake online research; communicate using e-mail; process information using databases; (GLO 6,7)
4.3 Working with others: define and review the work of others; work co-operatively on group tasks; understand how groups function; collaborate with others and contribute effectively to the achievement of common goals; (GLO 5,7)
4.4 Improving own learning: explore personal strengths and weaknesses; time management; review working environment (especially student-staff relationship); develop autonomy in learning; work independently, demonstrating initiative and self-organisation. Important research management skills include the setting of appropriate timescales for different stages of the research with clear starting and finishing dates (through a dissertation); presentation of a clear statement of the purposes and expected results of the research; and developing appropriate means of estimating and monitoring resources and use of time. (GLO 5,8)
4.5 Problem solving: identify and define problems; explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them. (GLO 3,8)

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