Negotiation and Mediation - PO848

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2017-18 2018-19
Brussels
(version 4)
Autumn
View Timetable
7 20 (10) DR J Diaz
Canterbury
(version 4)
Spring
View Timetable
7 20 (10) DR N Ansorg

Pre-requisites

None

Restrictions

None

2017-18

Overview

The course provides an overview and framework for considering the evolving field of international conflict resolution with an emphasis on negotiation and mediation. The module will focus primarily on the practical as well as on the theoretical aspects of negotiation and mediation, or more broadly third party intervention in conflicts. Its aims are to give the students an overview of the main problems involved in negotiation and mediation (broadly defined), but also to give them a chance to work individually and in groups on case studies and material related to the resolution of conflicts. The course is designed to introduce the students to theories of negotiation and bargaining, discuss the applicability of various tools and techniques in problem solving real cases of international conflict, and allow them to make use of such techniques in role playing and simulations.

This course is not taught in the conventional manner with lectures and seminars but, due to the nature of the material taught, involves block teaching and work over weekends. Students should consult the timetable and syllabus for further details.

Details

This module appears in:


Availability

Autumn Term

Method of assessment

Assessment will be based upon two essays, one of which (2000 words) is an integral part of a multilateral negotiation simulation exercise in which students participate. In the essay, each student will be asked to discuss challenges and lessons learned from the simulation, using examples from the day. The essay/simulation exercise makes up 20% of the overall mark.

The second piece of assessment, a 4000-5000 word essay, making up 80% of the overall mark, allows students to analyse a current conflict from a perspective of their choosing and to make use of the different skills learned throughout the course. Essential for this final project is that students demonstrate their capacity to use the course knowledge in practical situations. Students are asked to take one conflict in the world in which mediation or negotiations are taking place or could be a positive contribution. Students are to do a full negotiation or mediation analysis. Topics must be approved by the module convenor.

Preliminary reading

Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse, and Beth A Simmons, eds. 2002. Handbook of International Relations. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE
Hugh Miall, Oliver Ramsbotham, Tom Woodhouse (2005). Contemporary Conflict Resolution: The Prevention, Management and Transformation of Deadly Conflicts, Cambridge: Polity.
Thomas Schelling. (1960). The Strategy of Conflict. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.
Azar, Edward E. The Management of Protracted Social Conflict: Theory and Cases. Bookfield, VT: Gower Pub. Co., 1990. Thomas Princen (1992) Intermediaries in International Conflict. Princeton University Press.
I. William Zartman and J. Lewis Rasmussen, eds. (1997). Peacemaking in International Conflict: Methods and Techniques, U.S. Institute of Peace Press

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes
On successful completion of the module, students will be able to
SLO1: Understand key historical and theoretical issues in the field of conflict resolution
SLO2: Have some familiarity with the main theoretical schools that study mediation and negotiation
SLO3: Understand the main concepts and techniques used in bilateral and multilateral negotiation as well as in mediation, the most common form of conflict management and resolution
SLO4: Experience the practice of negotiation and mediation through a series of practical exercises conducted throughout the module
SLO5: Gain familiarity with the applied methodological and epistemological methods in the field of conflict resolution
SLO6: Critically analyse historical and current cases of conflict management and transformation

By helping students to progress towards these subject-specific outcomes, the module contributes to achieving the following Programme Learning Outcomes (PLO):
A.1. Key historical and theoretical issues in international conflict and the study of war and peace, together with familiarity with appropriate bibliographical sources (SSLO 1, 2, 5)
A.2. How to apply general theoretical and conceptual frameworks to the analysis of specific conflicts (SSLO 1, 5)
A.4. The different kinds of actors on the international scene, their respective interests and influence in conflict situations (SSLO 2, 3, 4)
A.5. Key theoretical problems of war and peace (SSLO 1, 2)
A.6. Current political challenges to international peace and security and possible strategies to address them (SSLO 3, 4, 5, 6)
A.8. How to design and conduct a research project demonstrating awareness of epistemological and methodological principles (SSLO 5, 6)
A.9. How to carry out an independent research project and write in a scholarly manner demonstrating familiarity with academic conventions (SSLO 1-6)

B.1. General research skills, especially bibliographic and computing skills (SSLO 2, 5)
B.2. Gather, organize and deploy evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and some primary sources (SSLO 4, 5)
B.3. Identify, investigate, analyse, formulate and advocate solutions to problems (SSLO 3, 6)
B.4. Develop reasoned arguments, synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement (SSLO 1, 2, 3, 6)
B.5. Reflect on, and manage, their own learning and seek to make use of constructive feedback from peers and staff to enhance their performance and personal skills (SSLO 4)
B. 6. Manage their own learning self-critically (SSLO 4)

C.1. Advanced understanding the nature and significance of conflict as a human condition (SSLO 1, 2)
C.2. Ability to critically apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of conflict to the analysis of political events, ideas, institutions and practices (SSLO 4, 6)
C.3. Ability to critically evaluate different interpretations of political issues and events (SSLO 6)
C.4. Ability to collect, analyse and present information about conflict and political events (SSLO 3, 6)
C.5. Awareness of the epistemological issues relevant to research in the social sciences, including the major theoretical and epistemological debates in the social sciences, as they bear on international conflict analysis (SSLO 1, 2)

The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme learning outcomes
Students who successfully complete this module
GLO1: will be able to work with theoretical knowledge at the forefront of their discipline
GLO2: will engage critically with the conflict resolution process, in particular negotiation and mediation, including the vocabulary, concepts, theories and methods of conflict resolution
GLO3: will have a comprehensive understanding of methods and methodologies in their discipline
GLO4: will develop reasoned arguments, supported by relevant information, and exercise critical thinking
GLO5: will have a level of conceptual understanding that will allow them to critically evaluate research, advanced scholarship and methodologies and argue alternative approaches
GLO6: will describe, evaluate and apply different approaches involved in collecting, analysing and presenting political information
GLO7: will be able to engage in academic and professional communication orally and in writing
GLO8: will have independent learning ability required for continuing professional study
GLO9: collaborate with others and contribute effectively to the achievement of common goals

By helping students to progress towards these subject-specific outcomes, the module contributes to achieving the following Programme Learning Outcomes (PLO):
A.1. Key historical and theoretical issues in international conflict and the study of war and peace, together with familiarity with appropriate bibliographical sources (GLO 1, 2)
A.2. How to apply general theoretical and conceptual frameworks to the analysis of specific conflicts (GLO 1, 3, 4)
A.4. The different kinds of actors on the international scene, their respective interests and influence in conflict situations (GLO 2)
A.5. Key theoretical problems of war and peace (GLO 1, 2)
A.6. Current political challenges to international peace and security and possible strategies to address them (GLO 2)
A.8. How to design and conduct a research project demonstrating awareness of epistemological and methodological principles (GLO 4, 5, 6)
A.9. How to carry out an independent research project and write in a scholarly manner demonstrating familiarity with academic conventions (GLO 6, 7, 8)

B.1. General research skills, especially bibliographic and computing skills (GLO 7, 8)
B.2. Gather, organize and deploy evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and some primary sources (GLO 4, 6)
B.3. Identify, investigate, analyse, formulate and advocate solutions to problems (GLO5)
B.4. Develop reasoned arguments, synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement (GLO 3, 5, 9)
B.5. Reflect on, and manage, their own learning and seek to make use of constructive feedback from peers and staff to enhance their performance and personal skills (GLO 9)
B. 6. Manage their own learning self-critically (GLO 8)

C.1. Advanced understanding the nature and significance of conflict as a human condition (GLO 2)
C.2. Ability to critically apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of conflict to the analysis of political events, ideas, institutions and practices (GLO 3, 4, 5)
C.3. Ability to critically evaluate different interpretations of political issues and events (GLO 4, 5)
C.4. Ability to collect, analyse and present information about conflict and political events (GLO 6, 7)
C.5. Awareness of the epistemological issues relevant to research in the social sciences, including the major theoretical and epistemological debates in the social sciences, as they bear on international conflict analysis (GLO 3, 4, 5)

D.1. Communication: communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing (including, where appropriate, the use of IT); organise information clearly and coherently; use communication and information technology for the retrieval and presentation of information, including, where appropriate, statistical or numerical information (GLO 7)
D.2. Information technology: produce written documents; undertake online research; communicate using e-mail; process information using databases (GLO 7)
D.3. Working with others: define and review the work of others; work co-operatively on group tasks; understand how groups function; collaborate with others and contribute effectively to the achievement of common goals (GLO 9)
D.4. Improving own learning: explore personal strengths and weaknesses; time management; review working environment (especially student-staff relationship); develop autonomy in learning; work independently, demonstrating initiative and self-organisation. Important research management skills include the setting of appropriate timescales for different stages of the research with clear starting and finishing dates (through a dissertation); presentation of a clear statement of the purposes and expected results of the research; and developing appropriate means of estimating and monitoring resources and use of time (GLO 2, 8)
D.5. Problem solving: identify and define problems; explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them (GLO 8)

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