Conservation and Communities - DI520

Location Term Level Credits (ECTS) Current Convenor 2017-18 2018-19
Canterbury Spring
View Timetable
6 15 (7.5) DR CJAM Gardner

Pre-requisites

None

Restrictions

None

2017-18

Overview

The driving causes of biodiversity loss are not just ecological, but also political, economic and cultural, and conservationists need to acquire the knowledge and skills to address broader social contexts. This module aims to introduce students to cutting-edge debates about the place of local people in biodiversity conservation, and provide them with an overview of the essential role that the social sciences play in the analysis of environmental issues. Objectives of the module are to provide students with a broad conceptual understanding of the social context of conservation, and particularly of the importance of politics and economics; knowledge of the history of conservation approaches towards local communities; familiarity with key issues in the implementation of community conservation; and a critical approach to analysis of the current conservation-preservation debate.

Details

This module appears in:


Contact hours

11 Lectures x 1 hr; 11 Seminars x 1 hr
Increased confidence in presentations, group work, critical evaluation and seminar participation.

Availability

This module contributes:
Wildlife Conservation

Method of assessment

50% Coursework; 50% 2-hour Written Examination

Preliminary reading

Russell, D. & Harsbarger, C. "Groundwork for Community Based Conservation"
Moulder, M.B. & Coppolillo, P. "Conservation: Linking Ecology, Economics and Culture" (2005)

See the library reading list for this module (Canterbury)

See the library reading list for this module (Medway)

Learning outcomes

Knowledge of the history of western conservation approaches towards local communities
A broad conceptual understanding of the social context of conservation, including economic, cultural and political factors
Familiarity with different forms of community conservation and key issues and techniques in its implementation
The ability to analyse case studies and come up with practical recommendations for management measures related to the relationship between communities and conservation
A critical approach to analysis of the current conservation-preservation debate
The ability to carry out library research, critically evaluate published journal papers, and cite them correctly
The ability to produce a concise and well-structured piece of written work on a set topic.

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