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Undergraduate Courses 2014
This is a 2014 entry programme. Would you like to view Cultural Studies and Social Anthropology for 2015 entry?

Cultural Studies and Social Anthropology BA (Hons)

Overview

It is often said that the world is changing more rapidly than at any other time in history, and the study of cultural transformation is key to achieving the ‘joined-up thinking’ society needs in the 21st century. Cultural Studies at Kent is a lively, innovative subject with distinctive perspectives on all forms of present day culture. We explore significant connections between popular culture, the arts and everyday life by crossing traditional social sciences/humanities boundaries.

Social Anthropology is a distinctive degree programme allowing for the holistic study of people's ideas, beliefs, practices and activities in a wide range of local, global, diasporic and transnational settings. Social anthropologists study how and why we do the things we do, for example, how we work, use technologies, and negotiate conflicts, relationships and change

Independent rankings

Cultural Studies programmes offer the best opportunity to combine modules right across the social science and humanities faculties.

Anthropology at Kent was ranked 1st in the UK for student satisfaction in the 2012 National Student Survey.

Course structure

The course structure below gives a flavour of the modules that will be available to you and provides details of the content of this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules, you may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Stage 1

Possible modules may include:

SE301 - Social Anthropology

Social Anthropology is a discipline which has traditionally specialised in the study of non-Western, pre-industrial societies. With increasing frequency, however, social and cultural anthropologists have turned towards the study of ‘home’, using insights gained from studying other cultures to illuminate aspects of their own society. This course draws on both these areas of social anthropology, looking at people from places as different as the rainforests of West Africa and the industrial heartlands of Britain and America, and introduces students to social anthropology through a selection of topics which have been chosen to illustrate the kind of issues that social anthropologists study and the kinds of arguments and theories they have developed.Module Topics Include: CULTURE, SYMBOLISM AND CLASSIFICATION (including language, myth, taboo). THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF INTIMATE LIFE (including marriage, divorce and exchange). RELIGION, RITUAL AND BELIEF (including initiation, and witchcraft). POWER, POLITICS AND IDENTITY (including ethnicity, nationalism, multiculturalism, globalisation).

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SE302 - Foundations of Biological Anthropology

This module is an introduction Biological Anthropology and human prehistory.It provides an exciting introduction to humans as the product of evolutionary processes. We will explore primates and primate behaviour, human growth and development, elementary genetics, the evolution of our species, origins of agriculture and cities, perceptions of race, and current research into human reproduction and sexuality.This module is required for all BSc in Anthropology and BA in Social Anthropology students. The module is also suitable for students in other disciplines who want to understand human evolution, and the history and biology of our species. A background in science is not assumed or required, neither are there any preferred A-levels or other qualifications.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SO334 - Modern Culture

This module introduces students to discussions and debates surrounding modern culture. It looks at why culture has always been such a contested sphere and has a decisive impact on society at large. Students will look at culture in the widest sense, ranging from ‘the arts’ to the banalities of everyday life in our consumer society; at how culture has expressed and organised the way people think and live from the days of 'protestantism' to those of post-punk. Books, magazines, radio, TV, movies, cartoons, fashion, graffiti, the cult of celebrity, youth subcultures and pop music will be used to understand class, history, sexuality, colonialism, revolution, conflict and globalisation.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO335 - Contemporary Culture

Contemporary culture is 'now-time' culture, but when did 'now’ begin - and, will it be over before the course starts? This module focuses on analysing contemporary culture and contemporary cultural forms and aims to demonstrate the range of possible interpretations that culture can be open to. It raises questions about how culture can be viewed from aesthetic, political, ethical and economic perspectives. What is culture really for? Is it product or a process? Who owns it? Is it for fun or is it deadly serious? In order to think through contemporary issues such as multiculturalism and otherness, and what they might imply about our changing perceptions of space, place, and belonging, we'll be taking a case study approach to a range of cultural products and objects, media and institutions, and post-modern practices of communication: including such things as maps and satnavs; internet pirates; social networking technologies like Facebook and Twitter; gossip magazines; conspiracy theories; plastic surgery and tattooing; 3D movie experiences; and interactive video games such as Wii. This module aims to understand the transformation of culture and everyday life we are living through and the way it changes who we are.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 2

Possible modules may include:

SE586 - Ethnographies 1

The focus of this module is the intensive investigation of the canonical form in which research in social anthropology has been disseminated, the ethnography. The curriculum for the module therefore consists exclusively of professional ethnographic monographs of varying length. These monographs have been selected to complement the themes of SE588 Advanced Social Anthropology I, as these are both core modules for the BA in Social Anthropology programme of study. Considerable time will be spent, particularly in the earlier seminars, on instruction about how to read and analyse an ethnography. This might include how to examine its implicit (as opposed to explicit) theoretical assumptions, how to place it within the historical development of the discipline, how to evaluate its empirical exemplification of particular theoretical problems, how to evaluate the relationship between description and analysis, how to evaluate its contribution to particular issues and topics within social anthropology, and the examination of its structure, presentation and ability to communicate an understanding of a social and cultural group through the written word. Students’ readings of the core ethnographies for the module will be complemented by their own pursuit of a brief ethnographic research project.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO506 - Popular Culture, Media and Society

This is a core module for Cultural Studies programmes, but is also open to and suitable for students on other programmes in the Humanities and in Social Studies. It may also be taken as a ‘wild’ option. The module introduces and applies ideas in critical, cultural and communications theory to debates and issues surrounding media and popular culture, focussing on such themes as cultural elitism, power and control, the formation of identities, the politics of representation and the cultural circuit of production and consumption and associated social phenomena . It investigates the relationship between the development of contemporary society and societal values and the changing technological basis of mediated culture. Specific media forms, contexts and topics dealt with vary from year to year but typically include, popular TV and film, the press, the internet, pop music, celebrity, drugs, hedonism and excess, consumer culture conspiracy theories, popular knowledges, censorship and the mediation of cultural memory. Key reading is supplied in the form of a ‘Course Reader’

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SE587 - Ethnographies 2

The curriculum for this module will consist of professional ethnographic monographs of varying length to be read at the rate of one (or selected substantial parts of one) monograph per week. The selection of the ethnographies will be determined by thematic conjunction with the analytical topics to be taught in the Advanced Social Anthropology 2 module, thereby divided into two congruent blocs. These are labelled ‘Power and Authority’ and ‘Belief and Practice’ [see Module specification for SE 589]. Students will be expected to come to class with notes from their reading and will be encouraged to discuss that reading and to relate it to wider anthropological issues raised or implied by the authors of the ethnographies and also dealt with historically and analytically in the co-requisite module Advanced Social Anthropology 1. Considerable time will be spent, particularly in the earlier classes, on instruction about how to ‘read’ an ethnography e.g. on how to examine its implicit (as opposed to explicit) theoretical assumptions, on how to place it within the historical development of the discipline, on how to evaluate its empirical exemplification of particular theoretical problems, on how to evaluate the relationship between ‘description’ and ‘analysis’, on how to evaluate it contribution to particular issues and topics within anthropology, and on the examination of its structure, presentation and ability to communicate an understanding of a social group through the written word.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE588 - Advanced Social Anthropology I

The aim of this module is to introduce students to advanced anthropological thinking on two major fields of enquiry that are generally considered to constitute part of the core of contemporary anthropology:
a) Kinship (dealing with the topics of Marriage, Family, Gender, Descent, ‘Relatedness’, the Developmental Cycle and Embodiment)
b) Economics (dealing with the topics of Consumption, Exchange, Money, Markets, Property, Modes of Production, Agricultural systems, Urbanisation, Globalisation.)
These topics will be dealt with both thematically and historically, providing an account of the development of anthropology, and demonstrating the foundational position that these topics have held and continue to hold in the definition of the discipline.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage


Stage 3

Possible modules may include:

SE554 - Visual Anthropology Theory

The aims of this module are to investigate how anthropology can contribute to - and gain insight from - the analysis of visual forms of representation; to examine anthropological representations with reference to contemporary media of expression employing photography, film, video, television and other electronic means of communication; to develop an anthropological understanding of contemporary audio-visual forms of cultural communication; and to consider theoretical debates from other social sciences and humanities (including literary criticism, film theory and cultural studies) pertinent to visual anthropology.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE555 - Project in Visual Anthropology

Building on conceptual issues introduced in Visual Anthropology Theory (SE554), students are given basic instruction in video or photographic methods which is linked through seminars and lectures to debates around and practical examples of video or still camera usage in ethnographic research and presentation.

Photographic Project
Students doing the photographic project should provide their own 35mm manual, semi-automatic or dedicated digital (not mobile phone) camera but will have access to black and white film stock as well as computer manipulation equipment and programmes (scanners and Adobe Photo Elements). They will as well have access to the department’s black and white photographic darkroom. Students, using this knowledge and equipment, will design and carry out an ethnographic project using photographs. This, together with a field diary, a short photographic essay, and accompanying dissertation, will make up the materials assessed for the module.

Video Project
Students doing the video project will have access to video cameras and video editing software. Students are assessed on the basis of a ten minute film, a reflexive essay, a blog, a field diary and participation.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO657 - Digital Culture

This module will approach the so-called “information age” from a cultural perspective, and concentrate on how the Internet in particular has challenged some of our more traditional notions of identity, relationships, community, space and culture. Lectures will show how some of the basic components of culture such as notions of identity, space, the body, community and subculture have been complicated by the rise of virtuality and cyberspace. We will also consider how cyberspace has become its own cultural context.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO676 - Cultures of Embodiment

Images of ‘trim, taut and terrific’ bodies surround us in contemporary consumer culture. They look down on us from billboards, are increasingly central to advertisers’ attempts to sell us clothes, cosmetics, cars, and other products, and pervade reality television programmes based on diet, exercise and ‘extreme’ makeovers. These trends have occurred at the same time that science, technology, genetic engineering and medicine have achieved unprecedented levels of control over the body: there are now few parts of the body which cannot be remoulded, supplemented or transplanted in one way or another. In this course we explore how culture represents and shapes bodies, and also examine how embodied subjects are themselves able to act on and influence the culture in which they live. We will seek to understand the relationship between the body and self-identity, embodiment and inequalities, and will explore various theories of the body. In doing this we range far and wide by looking at such issues as cyberbodies, religion, food, film, transgenderism, sport, music, work and sleep. Embodiment is the enduring theme of this course, though, and we will explore its many dimensions via a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives, and by asking and addressing a range of questions such as ‘How and why has the body become increasingly commodified?’, ‘Why has the body become increasingly central to so many people’s sense of self-identity?’, ‘If we live in a culture that has been able to intervene in the sizes, shapes and contents of the body like never before, have people have become less sure about what is ‘natural’ about the body, and about how we should care for and treat our bodily selves?’.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SE556 - Social Sciences in the Classroom

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE565 - Sex Evolution and Human Nature

Understand the theoretical concerns, methods, and findings of current empirical research in evolutionary anthropology.
Understand aspects of human behaviour in terms of our evolutionary past.
Recognize the implications of Darwin’s theories of natural and sexual selection for human behaviour.
Have an in depth knowledge of human sexual and reproductive behaviour.
Have the ability to critically evaluate new anthropological/evolutionary psychology approaches to the study of human behaviour.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE573 - Ethnicity and Nationalism

‘Ethnicity’ and ‘nationalism’ are matters of contemporary urgency (as we are daily reminded by the media), but while the meanings of these terms are taken for granted, what actually constitutes ethnicity and nationalism, and how they have been historically constituted, is neither clear nor self-evident. This module begins with a consideration of the major theories of nationalism and ethnicity, and then moves on to a series of case studies taken from various societies around the world. It then moves on to examine a number of other important concepts—indigeneity, ‘race’, hybridity, authenticity, ‘invention of tradition’, multiculturalism, globalization—that can help us appreciate the complexity and dynamics of ethnic identities. The general aim of the module is to enable and encourage students to think critically beyond established, homogenous and static ethnic categories.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE575 - Medicinal Plants: Home Remedy, Pharmaceutical, Illicit Drug

This module is an introduction to ethnopharmacology, a multidisciplinary field of study that employs chemistry, ecology, biology, pharmacology and anthropology to evaluate and understand the use of plants (and other substances) in non-western medical systems. While students will be introduced to all of the disciplines involved in ethnopharmacological research, this module will have a heavy anthropological focus. Lecture and reading materials will address questions related to the actions of natural products in the human body, the ecological and evolutionary basis of medicinal plants use, the epistemology of non-western medical systems, the efficacy of medicinal plants and the ethics of developing pharmaceuticals based on traditional medicines.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE584 - The Anthropology of Business

This module addresses the important role that anthropology plays in the examination of our own organizational lives as embedded in various forms of capitalism. The module will allow students to gain anthropological perspectives on business formation, structures, practices and ideologies. Businesses - be they individuals, families, corporations, nation-states or multi-lateral corporations - have identities that are invariably distinct from one another and which are forged upon and promote particular social relationships. Ethnographic case-studies, with a strong emphasis on the stock market in the last third of the course will provide the basis for discussing how these social relationships that enact power, are embedded in broader cultural processes extending from the local to the global. the module is designed to be accessible to both anthropology and business students.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE585 - From the Raw to the Cooked: The Anthropology of Eating

Students will learn about the evolution and significance of food production, especially in relation to globalisation, identity and health. The module will cover different modes of food production, the domestication of animals and the cultivation of staple crops in the course of social development. it will look at different theories about the importance of food production for the rise of urban cultures and organised religion, and the relationship of food production systems to trade, colonial expansion and the process of globalisation. Moving from production and distribution to eating itself, the module will cover notions of food identity at collective and individual levels, by looking at the process of food preparation and consumption and abstinence in different cultural settings. We will also look at various forms of disordered eating, the dynamic relationship between cultures and eating and contemporarary debates over fast food, genetic engineering, and personal identity against the background of rising food prices, regional food shortage and the management of famine in different countries.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE534 - Special Project in Social Anthropology

This module offers students the opportunity to design, execute and write up an extended piece of research of their own devising. Students may pursue a module of reading under supervision on a particular topic or undertake a limited fieldwork project. Students registering for the special project will normally be expected to be achieving 2.1 grades or above and to have shown strong evidence of the sort of self-discipline necessary for successfully carrying out extended independent work.
All projects must be supervised by a member of staff. Students who wish to do a project should collect the information sheet from the School Undergraduate Office (room 13a Marlowe Building) and return to the office – signed by the proposed supervisor – both the slip at the bottom and a one page typed sheet outlining the proposed project and including a preliminary reading list of at least five books. This must be done during Stage 2 not later than one week before Registration Day; students who do not provide a signed slip and proposal by this date may not be allowed to register for the project.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SE542 - Human Ecology

This is an introduction to environmental anthropology, and a critical exploration of theories concerning the relationship between culture, social organisation and ecology. The topics covered will include problems in defining nature and environment, environmental determinism and cultural ecology, biological models and the concept of system, ethnoecology, the description of subsistence, the concept of cultural adaptation, the ecology of hunting and gathering peoples, low intensity agriculture, intensification, environment, culture and development, and the anthropology of the environmental movement.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE549 - The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Medicine

The module addresses the causes, effects, treatments and meanings of health and illness. Health and illness are of major concern to most of us, irrespective of our cultural, social and biological contexts. In this module we will begin with an overview of the major theoretical paradigms and methods in medical anthropology. We will then focus on how and why different diseases have affected various human populations throughout history and the ways perceptions of what constitutes health and illness vary greatly, cross-culturally as well as within one particular cultural domain. This will be followed by an overview of ethnomedical systems as a response to illness and disease. Anthropological studies in the sphere of medicine originally tended to concentrate on other people’s perceptions of illness, but have increasingly come to focus on the difficulties encountered when trying to define what constitutes health in general. Anthropology has also turned its attention to a critical examination of biomedicine: originally thought of as providing a ‘value free, objective and true’ assessment of various diseases (epidemiology), biomedicine is now itself the subject of intense anthropological scrutiny and is seen as the expression of a culturally specific system of values. The module will finish with the consideration of practical applications of medical anthropology.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE550 - The Anthropology of Gender

This module explores the central historical and contemporary debates in the anthropology of gender, including: the search for universal principles underlying gender inequality (such as nature/culture and domestic/public), relationships between gender, sex, and sexuality, how gender articulates with other indices of difference such as race, class and nation, gendered perspectives on power, the interaction of agency and structure in the production of femininities and masculinities, gender and technology, gender and the state, and gendered modernities. A key concern of the module will be to understand, discuss and debate how the primarily qualitative methods of ethnographic research can inform and further these debates. The module will first review the historiography of theoretical developments in the anthropology of gender and feminist anthropology, then move on to consider key classic and contemporary ethnographies to explore how they contribute to our ability to analyse and understand gender.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE551 - Anthropology and Language

An introduction to linguistic anthropology and a critical exploration of the relationship between language, culture, and social organisation. Topics covered will include language and thought in the history of anthropology, the rudiments of linguistic description, language as a social phenomenon, oratory and ritual speech, the significance of the written word and literacy, speech variation, the links between language, social structure and culture, linguistic aspects of symbolism, the relationship between words and categories, colour classification and universalist versus relativist theories.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE552 - Culture and Cognition

An introduction to cognitive anthropology and a critical exploration of theories concerning the relationship between cognitive processes, culture and social organisation. The topics covered will include the forming of categories, relations between categories, the symbolic construction of nature, the classification of natural kinds, the convergence of cognitive and symbolic approaches, the evolution of hominid cognitive processes, the development of second order representations, social cognition and classification, spatial orientation, time reckoning and the cultural construction of knowledge.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE593 - Evolution of Human Diversity

This module deals specifically with the evolution of biological diversity within the human species. The nature and extent of the biological diversity observed amongst human populations has been at the heart of anthropological enquiry for centuries. This module will provide an in-depth introduction into human phenotypic and genetic diversity across the globe.

Biological anthropologists today use a variety of analytical models and techniques drawn from population genetics,quantitative genetics, and evolutionary ecology to analyse human biological diversity. Students will be introduced to these so that the complexities of evolutionary and ecological theories are readily understood.

Students will learn the extent to which humans have adapted to various environmental conditions, as well as understanding the effects of recent demographic changes and population expansions.

This facilitates a direct comparison with other non-evolutionary ecological patterns, while placing human diversity in broad comparative perspective. This also serves as a platform for critically evaluating claims of human ecological or evolutionary uniqueness.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE594 - Anthropology and Development

This module is primarily intended to offer a critical analysis of the concept of development, particularly as it is used to talk about economic and social change in the developing world, the module shows how anthropological knowledge and understanding can illuminate 'development issues' such as rural poverty, environmental degradation, international aid and humanitarian assistance, climate change and the globalization of trade. Topics discussed include the role of anthropology in development practice, by examining some of the methods being used to either study or participate in current development projects, whether at local, national or international levels of intervention.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE595 - Social Computing

In this module you will learn how people are using social computing resources, how anthropologists and others understand these activities, how to access and deploy these resources yourself, and how to leverage your participation to better understand social and cultural processes that are underway in social computing contexts.

In Social Computing we describe and analyse how people use and adapt new technologies to form and navigate cultural and social contexts, create and spread knowledge and undertake action emerging from computer-enhanced capabilities. Capabilities include the internet (including so call Web 2.0), clouds, augmented reality, robotics and virtual devices, wearable computers and sensors and artificial intelligence.

We begin by looking at the major theoretical paradigms and methods that have guided research on these in anthropology and related disciplines. In the remainder of the module we examine case studies of social computing based on different capabilities, using a took-kit that supports the creation and analysis of social computing capabilities and developing group and individual contributions to an on-going collective module project that will contribute to the Social Computing context.

Topics considered include the creative commons of open source, Web 2.0 and resource clouds, social networks, organisational change, reputation, social, lgel and ethical issues, mobile and ubiquitous computing and argmented reality. Topics discussed in class will provide ideas and models for student research projects.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SE752 - Anthropology of Creativity

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO505 - Sociology of Crime and Deviance

The aim of this module is to provide students with a critical understanding of the nature and extent of crime and deviance in contemporary society, and the main ways in which they can be explained and controlled. Focusing upon contemporary sociological theories of crime against a background of the classical ideas within the field, this unit will provide undergraduates with an opportunity to engage with the most up-to-date debates.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SO659 - Risk and Society

The course is concerned with the relatively new ideas of living in a ‘risk society’ which theoretically capture the heightened sensitivity within Western societies to the numerous ‘risks’ which shape our lives. The course will explore basic concepts of risk, hazard and probability and how risk is managed and communicated. Topics will include risk and globalization, and risk and the media. Developments will be examined through key examples such as ‘mad cow’ disease and genetically modified ‘frankenfoods’. The course will suggest that heightened perception of risk is here to stay, and is leading to a reorganisation of society in important areas.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO668 - The Sociology of Work

Work and economic life is one of the central themes of sociology. Work allows us to think about class, gender, race and issues of identity. Work defines how people live their lives and is a major constituting factor in identity formation. In recent years work has changed enormously with the rise of globalisation, of deindustrialisation and the ending of old certainties which used to underpin working lives. This module examines how sociology and sociologists have looked at the issue of work in the past as well as in contemporary societies. It charts the theoretical background to the assumptions sociologists make about work as well as the methods they use to investigate work and employment. The module will focus on issues industrialisation, deindustrialisation, notions of career and identity and places and spaces of work. A major part of this module is the discussion of innovative ways of looking at work including through visual methods and approaches, and in addition it will draw on material from the arts and humanities.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO525 - Environmental Politics

Environmental issues have become central matters of public concern and political contention. In this module we shall consider explanations for the rise and social distribution of environmental concern as well as the forms of organisation that have been adopted to address environmental questions, including the emergence of global environmental issues and the responses to them. The development of environmental protest, environmental movements and Green parties are central concerns, but we shall also consider the ‘greening’ of established political parties and political agenda. Is it realistic to expect the development of a global environmental movement adequate to the task of tackling global environmental problems. The approach is broadly comparative and examples will be taken from Europe (east and west), North America, Australasia and south-east Asia.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO533 - Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice

The aims of this module are:

1. to understand the historical development of feminist criminology and its contemporary relevance 2. To explore the relationship between gender and offending and
3. Examine the role of gender in criminal justice.

Topics covered in the module include: prostitution, masculinities and crime, women and drug dealing, women in the criminal justice system, criminal justice responses to gendered violence, women in gangs and feminist methods and theory in criminology.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO534 - Violence and Society

This module will examine the ways in which violence is receiving increasing attention within the social sciences, and will introduce the major theoretical and research themes involved in the analysis of violence. It will examine data on the prevalence, nature and effects of violent crime, and will consider issues of violence, aggression and masculinity. This will be done with particular reference to examples, such as racist crime, homophobic crime and domestic violence. The module will approach violence from interpersonal and societal perspectives and will include consideration of collective violence and genocide. It will further examine solutions to solutions to violence and conflict resolution, the effects of intervention strategies and non-juridical responses to violence.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO535 - Youth and Crime

This module provides students with a sociological and criminological understanding of contemporary issues relating to young people, crime and deviance. More specifically, the module provides a critical understanding of young people’s involvement in crime and deviance and the various responses to youth crime, especially how young people are dealt with by the youth justice system. We begin by examining current trends in youth offending and explore media responses and then go on to look at ‘the youth problem’ from an historical context. We will then go on to focus in depth on several substantive topics, including gangs and violent crime; drugs, alcohol and nightlife; young people, urban space and antisocial behaviour; and the youth justice system in England and Wales. Throughout the module, attention is given to the importance of understanding the connections of youth crime with race, class and gender and at the same time, engages with key theoretical ideas and debates that inform our understandings of youth crime. This unit provides an opportunity to engage with the most up-to-date debates in an area of great interest in contemporary society.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO537 - Race and Racism

What is meant by ‘racism’? Charges of racism are seemingly everywhere – in the workplace, in the streets, in everyday interactions. But what exactly is racism? Is it beliefs about racial inferiority or superiority? Is it found in actions and consequences whether people intended to be racist or not? We will first review difference theories of racism, and critically assess how changing conceptualisations of racism arise in specific, socio-political contexts. We will also consider whether a colour-blind future is desirable and/or possible.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO539 - Environmental Policy and Practice

This module aims to give you an understanding of the ways in which governments have attempted to address environmental issues such as climate change, conservation, and pollution control. It discusses the role of government and other interest groups in formulating environmental policy, outlining and applying key principles used to do so.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO594 - Terrorism and Modern Society

Following the events of September 11 2001 public concerns surrounding the related threats associated with terrorism have inevitably deepened. This course provides a general introduction to terrorism and poses a series of questions that rarely feature in mainstream criminological and sociological discourse. Central elements of the course include an examination of the historical roots of terrorism; an analysis of threat posed by the various terrorist factions associated with the ‘global Salafi jihad’; the contextualization of terrorism within the context of late modernity; and an analysis of terrorism at the macro, meso, and micro levels

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO605 - Crime , Media and Culture

The module provides students with an understanding of the contested cultural meanings underpinning crime. Too often criminology is satisfied taking definitions of criminality at face value, when really it means very different things to different people and in different contexts. The module examines how media representations propagate particular perceptions of crime, criminality and justice. It goes on to consider the manner in which those who 'offend' experience and interpret their own behaviour, which may be focused on the attainment of excitement or indeed on attaining their own conception of justice. The module explores these contradictions in a world where crime, control and the media saturate everyday life. In doing so it considers a diverse range of concepts; youth culture, hedonism, hate crime, risk taking, moral panics, the image, emotionality and consumerism. We examine the nature of a late-modern society where criminality inspires great fear and resentment, whilst at the same time it provides imagery which is harnessed to produce entertainment and sell a range of consumer goods. Students will become familiar with cutting edge research and theory in the fields of Cultural Criminology, Visual Criminology, and Media and Crime, placing issues such as music, photography, street gangs, extreme sports, newspapers and nights on the town in new and exciting contexts.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP518 - The Book and the Film: Adaptation and Interpretation

This module seeks to explore how novels and plays are adapted and interpreted for the screen. We shall be looking at how certain texts lend themselves to multiple reshaping such as Laclos’ 'Dangerous Liasions' and Henry James’ 'The Turn of the Screw', both of which have been adapted for the screen more than once. We shall also analyse lesser known works that have gone on to become feature films, such as Arthur Schnitzler’s short work ‘Dream Story’, filmed as 'Eyes Wide Shut'. Adaptations directed by widely recognised filmmakers such as De Sica, Max Ophuls, Kubrick and Pier Paolo Pasolini will also be examined with a view to eliciting and understanding their particular approach to, and filmic vision of, written texts.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP527 - Medieval Literature and Culture

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP530 - Marriage, Adultery and Divorce in 19th Century Fiction

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP609 - Modernism and the European Avant-Garde

The module will begin with the study of some of the major avant-garde movements (including Expressionism, Futurism, Imagism, Vorticism, Dada, and Surrealism) that sprang up in the first two decades of the twentieth century. Students will read a range of short manifestos and literary works by Tristan Tzara, Filippo Marinetti, T. E. Hulme, Wyndham Lewis, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, André Breton, and others. Once both the diversity and the international nature of modernism have been considered, students will go on to look in depth at a series of major modernist writers from different national backgrounds, and to identify what these writers share, what distinguishes them from one another, and, in some cases, what sets them in violent opposition. The aim here will be to give students a sense of the plurality of modernisms and the conflicts that were internal to the movement. Although the focus will be on some of the most significant individual works of modernist literature (for instance, Proust’s Swann’s Way, Kafka’s The Trial, Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Eliot’s The Waste Land), shorter texts, both literary and critical/theoretical, will also constitute the recommended reading in preparation for seminars. Seminal essays by major commentators on the modernist movement such as Walter Benjamin, Georg Lukács, and Theodor Adorno will constitute part of the primary reading. The aim throughout will be to strike a balance between close reading and the consideration of the more general theoretical and political issues at stake in the modernist ‘revolution of the word’. Students will also be encouraged to explore the ways in which modernism finds expression in the visual arts, particularly in Expressionism, Cubism, and Abstraction.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP611 - Postmodernism

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP624 - The Shoah in Literature, Film and Culture

In the immediate aftermath of the cataclysmic events of the Shoah the philosopher and sociologist Theodor W. Adorno interrogated the meaning of ‘culture’ after the failure of culture. In contemporary discourse, the Shoah – or the Holocaust, as the National Socialist extermination plans are more commonly, yet controversially, labelled – has long since turned into a marketable icon of suffering. Indeed, the encroachment on the victims’ memory of what has contentiously been called the ‘Holocaust industry’ or, with a gruesome pun, ‘Shoah business’, is frequently perceived as threatening to pervert remembrance of this singular event in history. Ever since Adorno’s often quoted and frequently misunderstood ‘dictum’ that it is barbaric to write poetry ‘after Auschwitz’ (1949), a discussion about the value and the significance of the representation of the Shoah in cultural production has been engaged in. Many of the concerns focused on in this debate remain controversial, among them the questions of the memory of the Shoah and its medial representations, and of the potentially therapeutic value of confronting the trauma of genocide in cultural production.

In this module, students will enter into these debates by enquiring into the ability of narrative, in literature, film and other forms of memorialisation, to represent the ‘unrepresentable’, by exploring the use of these narratives as ‘history’, and by investigating the so-called ‘Americanisation’ of the Shoah. In addition, they will enquire into the historical and cultural contexts of the Shoah.

In the first term particular emphasis will therefore be placed on the cultural and historical context of the ‘Jewish question’, including nationalism, race theory and anti-Semitism. Source material to be discussed in seminars will include theoretical, (pseudo-) scientific writings, literary and legal texts and films which document the paradigm change from religious anti-Judaism to a primarily racially motivated anti-Semitism. This will be followed by discussions of the literature of testimony by survivors of the Shoah, of poetic responses to the Shoah and of ‘fabricated’ memory. The first term will be concluded by a discussion of early media coverage of the liberation of the concentration camp of Buchenwald and by Allied efforts of representing the Shoah as a means of implementing their policy of re-education in post-war Germany.

The second term will be focused on more recent forms of representation and memorialisation of the Shoah, concentrating especially on formal and medial variety and innovation as well as shifts of perspective.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP627 - Science Fiction: History and Innovation

This module examines the development of science fiction from the second half of the nineteenth century to its current global status in both serious and popular culture. It explores how science fiction has developed via the interaction of different genres, different media and different national cultures. The module begins with the work of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells since their fiction is at the root of international variants of science fiction. Special attention will be paid to the comparative analysis of science fiction from the Americas, Western and Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union. Consideration will also be given to the relationship of literature to film, especially surrounding topics such as aliens and alienation, genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, dystopia and apocalypse.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP629 - Second Thoughts: Women Novelists from Bronte to Jelinek

This module investigates representations of gender and identity in a selection of texts by women writers from different temporal, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds. In particular, it seeks to explore the way in which representations of “self” and “other”, love and desire, madness and motherhood reflect the respective socio-cultural contexts and the situation of women therein. Corporeal aesthetics, patterns of behaviour labelled as feminine or masculine, representations of transgressive conduct, and relations of power will be investigated, drawing on classic feminist theory and historiography (Wollstonecraft, Beauvoir, Irigaray, Butler, Moi, Badinter), psychoanalytical thought (Freud), narratology (Genette), genre-theory (Bakhtin) subject-theory (Sartre, Levinas, Derrida) and studies in visual culture (Barthes, Sontag, Mulvey).

Students will be asked to engage with the significance of images and representations of women and men proliferated through literature. These representations provide or question role models and perpetuate or problematise stereotypical versions of female/male goals and aspirations. Furthermore, emphasis will be placed on close readings of the selected literary works, on cultural differences and variations, and on how conceptions of sex and gender are changing in the course of time.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP636 - European Realism

This module is concerned with the development of literary realism in nineteenth century Europe. A representative selection of writers is studied, including Balzac, Flaubert, Eliot, Tolstoy and Zola. We will explore realism not only as a set of techniques but also as an ideology: a particular way of viewing and re-presenting the world in literary form. As such, we will also explore contradictions in terms of the realist method, especially in its negotiation of gender, sexuality and desire. Although the focus is primarily textual, we will consider cultural and historical factors such as literary production, class and economic conditions, science and technology, religion and philosophy, and the social positions of men and women.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP642 - The Epic: From Homer to Walcott

This module is designed to introduce students to the foundational epics of Western literature. It will explore the development of the genre from the Greeks to Virgil, Dante, and two of the most significant modern epics of the twentieth-century: Joyce’s Ulysses and Walcott’s Omeros. The module will encourage students to reflect on how the epic has survived as a literary form and the various ways in which writers across the centuries have engaged with and transformed this ambitious literary genre. The module will also examine the historical, religious, and cultural contexts out of which the epics originated, including Homer’s gods and society; Virgil’s creation of a national epic for the civitas of Rome; Dante’s Christian epic of salvation and damnation; Joyce’s experimental and controversial epic of the human body; and Walcott’s postcolonial epic set on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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CP644 - Creatures of the Night: Vampires in Literature and Film

This module introduces students to a range of nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first-century literary and cinematic representations of vampires from different cultural backgrounds. It explores the reasons for the abiding allure of the figure of the vampire both in popular culture and in literary fiction. The module examines the ways in which vampires function as polyvalent symbols of specifically modern preoccupations, for the emergence and popularity of vampire tales is intricately bound up with the advent and wider cultural ramifications of modernity. What do vampires represent in each of the works discussed, and what hidden desires and anxieties do they allow authors and filmmakers to express? The vampire is an allegorically highly potent figure which is suspended between life and death and between animal and human existence. The figure of the vampire is frequently used to address more contentious matters, in particular questions relating to sexuality, gender roles, class, cultural and racial others, and addiction.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP646 - Prize Winners

The award of literary prizes is a highly potent tool of cultural policy that frequently determines the wider national and international impact of a literary work. As such it is of crucial relevance to the study of comparative literature in a number of ways: the award of literary prizes reflects the beginnings of the successful or, as the case may be, the (ultimately) abortive formation of literary canons; moreover, it affords insights into processes of cultural production and marketing and reveals in which ways political and economic agendas are tied up with these processes; it also offers a perspective on transnational and transcultural aspects of the production and reception of literature and indicates shifting notions of the social function of literature and the writer; literature is thus understood as a cultural product in ever changing contexts which is frequently subject to external forces of which literary prizes become indicators or even ‘enforcers’. This module will investigate with the methods of literary and cultural studies the development of a number of major literary awards which have achieved global significance, among them the Nobel Prize for Literature, the Man Booker Prize, the Pulitzer Prize (for Fiction), the Prix Goncourt, and the Friedenspreis des Deutschen Buchhandels. (This list may be modified according to precedent to accommodate the topical relevance of individual award winners in the future.) Seminars will develop a historical perspective by scrutinising and analysing award winners of the past and their most recent counterparts in their different production and marketing contexts as well as in changing reception contexts: seminars will include the close reading of individual works as well as their critical reception, and the analysis of marketing strategies in various media (e.g. reports in culture magazines, reviews, displays in book shops, translations, etc.); final winners will be interpreted in the context of the respective long and short lists from which they emerged; historical developments will be taken into account, for instance by investigating ‘forgotten’ prize winners in comparison with those who, largely through the agency of academic intervention, ‘made it’ into the canon; the module thus also offers an insight into the history of the discipline of literary studies.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP647 - Prize Winners

The award of literary prizes is a highly potent tool of cultural policy that frequently determines the wider national and international impact of a literary work. As such it is of crucial relevance to the study of comparative literature in a number of ways: the award of literary prizes reflects the beginnings of the successful or, as the case may be, the (ultimately) abortive formation of literary canons; moreover, it affords insights into processes of cultural production and marketing and reveals in which ways political and economic agendas are tied up with these processes; it also offers a perspective on transnational and transcultural aspects of the production and reception of literature and indicates shifting notions of the social function of literature and the writer; literature is thus understood as a cultural product in ever changing contexts which is frequently subject to external forces of which literary prizes become indicators or even ‘enforcers’. This module will investigate with the methods of literary and cultural studies the development of a number of major literary awards which have achieved global significance, among them the Nobel Prize for Literature, the Man Booker Prize, the Pulitzer Prize (for Fiction), the Prix Goncourt, and the Friedenspreis des Deutschen Buchhandels. (This list may be modified according to precedent to accommodate the topical relevance of individual award winners in the future.) Seminars will develop a historical perspective by scrutinising and analysing award winners of the past and their most recent counterparts in their different production and marketing contexts as well as in changing reception contexts: seminars will include the close reading of individual works as well as their critical reception, and the analysis of marketing strategies in various media (e.g. reports in culture magazines, reviews, displays in book shops, translations, etc.); final winners will be interpreted in the context of the respective long and short lists from which they emerged; historical developments will be taken into account, for instance by investigating ‘forgotten’ prize winners in comparison with those who, largely through the agency of academic intervention, ‘made it’ into the canon; the module thus also offers an insight into the history of the discipline of literary studies.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP650 - Decadence in Fin-de-Siecle Europe

The module explores the development of decadence in late nineteenth-century Europe as an artistic response, a philosophic expression and a social critique. Taking the work of Charles Baudelaire and the failed revolutions of 1848 as its starting-points, the module examines decadence as both a symptom of political and artistic frustration and as a psychological investigation of what Max Weber would later term ‘the disenchantment of the world’. Key themes will include the role of the artist, nature versus artifice, fantasy and desire, sexuality, social morality versus personal freedom, and death. The module will not only explore decadence in terms of different literary genres (fiction, drama, poetry) but also in the visual arts of the period.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP652 - Postcolonial Images of Africa and South Asia

This is a module about the intersection of colonial power relations, anti-colonialism, postcolonialism, feminism, and identity politics in literature from 1940 to 2010 which interrogates the influence of imperialism on a sense of self. It considers the writing of a number of women and men from Algeria, Morocco, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, India and Sri Lanka in a range of genres from the Francophone and Anglophone traditions (short story, essay, novel, autobiography). In light of the complex relationship between coloniser and colonised, we consider the political activism of many of these writers, as well as the ways in which their politics are articulated in their writing, whether fiction or non-fiction. We also examine to what extent this literature is representative of other postcolonial concerns such as nationhood and national consciousness, hybridity and assimilation, and exile and alienation within the larger context of cultural theory. Particularly significant is our interrogation of the violence inscribed in both the colonial system and the colonised’s fight for independence as seen from the psychoanalytical perspectives of Frantz Fanon in 'Black Skin, White Masks' (1952), 'A Dying Colonialism' (1959), 'The Wretched of the Earth' (1961). Studying the primary and secondary texts in English, we bring awareness to the reading scene of the translation process as an important development in the transnational study of comparative literature in our global world. In so doing, we acknowledge the significance of indigenous languages and dialects as signifers of subjecthood in conflict with the coloniser’s language. By exploring a variety of anti-colonial resistance and liberation discourses in relation to the development of current postcolonial thinking, the module also offers and insight into the history of the discipline of Colonial and Postcolonial studies.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP653 - Comparative Literature and English & Linguistics in the Classroom

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP656 - Shakespeare's Afterlives

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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CP658 - Nordic Literature and Film

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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FR593 - Paris: Myth and Reality in the 19th century

Among the capital cities of Europe, Paris has a particularly rich and interesting history. In the revolution of 1789 and subsequent political upheavals in the course of the nineteenth century (1830, 1848, 1870-71), the city played a key role in deciding the fate of the nation. In the same period, it grew dramatically in size and emerged as a modern metropolis. Widely divergent views were expressed as to the wholesomeness of city living; opinion differed equally violently among writers as to the benefits to be derived from the explosive growth of the city. The module will examine conditions of life in the real Paris of the 19th Century and in particular the radical and highly controversial changes to the face of the city brought about during the Second Empire under the direction of Baron Haussmann. The main focus of the module, however, will be the images of the city as mediated in contemporary fiction (Balzac and Zola amongst others), poetry (Baudelaire) and painting (Manet’s vision of city life).

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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FR594 - Paris: Myth and Reality in the 20th century

Among the capital cities of Europe, Paris has a particularly rich and exciting history. It played, for example, a key role during the revolution of 1789 and subsequent political upheavals in the course of the 19th century. This module follows on from FR593 – ‘Paris: Myth and Reality I’ (which is NOT a prerequisite for FR594). It explores the different and evolving representations of Paris of the 20th century in the context of modernity and postmodernity. We will examine the changing cityscape as it is represented in poetry, fiction and film. How do our authors and filmmakers choose to represent the city? Which aspects of urban life do they focus on, and why? These are among the questions we will explore.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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HA573 - Print Collecting and Curating

The module Print Collecting and Curating will provide a practice-based approach to art history to complement the academic approach of other modules in the History and Philosophy of Art programme. By focussing on prints it will aim to provide students with an “apprenticeship” in two practical areas of art history, namely collecting and curating. The module will involve students in the full cycle of these two interrelated processes: from identifying and acquiring a print, to cataloguing and curating it, to making sense of it to a wider public by placing it in the context of a themed exhibition. The module will begin by familiarising students with the contents of the HPA departmental print collection. The core of this collection will have been established in advance of the module running for the first time by HPA staff, but in subsequent years the collection will reflect the work done on it by successive cohorts of students. This initial process of familiarisation will be accompanied by lectures on the history and techniques of printmaking, and by trips to the British Museum print room and Canterbury Cathedral library. It will culminate in the first assessment task: each student will submit an “exhibition bid” proposing an idea for an exhibition based on the existing collection and suggesting new acquisitions (and possibly loans) to realise the idea. The concepts for exhibitions could derive from the subject matter or techniques of prints in the collection, or they could involve focussing on a particular artist or period (e.g. prints after Van Dyck). The best conceived bid will then be adopted by the group who will work collectively to put on the exhibition. At this stage students will visit dealers and auction houses and carry out object-based research in order to secure new acquisitions. A study diary will be kept by each student to record this process and will be submitted at the end of the module as part of the overall assessment. As prints are acquired they will be catalogued to a professional standard format and these entries will form the basis of a catalogue to accompany the exhibition that will be the culmination of the module. Putting on the exhibition will require practical team-work to frame and hang the prints, to write and produce labels and illustrative material, to publicise and staff the exhibition (comparable to the collective work involved in staging a dramatic performance). The ability to work to a timetable and within a budget will be important factors at this stage of the module. A percentage of each student’s overall assessment will reflect the success of this collective endeavour.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA587 - Against Realism: Varieties of Photograhic Pictorialism

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA591 - Dialogues: Art History in a Global Context

Through a selective engagement with particular moments and features of the history of art, visual culture and aesthetic theories this module raises questions about the relationship between western and non-western cultural traditions. The course revolves around a series of discussions about 'encounters' between western and non-western traditions, as well as the appropriations from and differences between their traditions of representational and non-representational art. In examining the influences, appropriations and cross-fertilizations of western and non-western art and culture the course will also place these issues in a broader political and social history of the rise of nationalism, continental trade relations, advents of war, tourism, colonialism and imperialism. It will look at the nature of 'dialogue' from a critical and art historical perspective, and thus also consider the terms and even the failures of dialogue between the west and non-western traditions; the exclusions, altercations, violations and marginalization of other cultures and their traditions.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA595 - Visual Arts Writing

• This module will be for final year students who are interested in gaining employment within the art and heritage press and/or marketing sectors. It will complement the vocational and work-based emphasis of the existing HPA Internship module (HA579). It will comprise a series of taught seminars supplemented by visiting speakers from the art/trade press, and from across the marketing and heritage sectors [6-8 speakers per module delivery].

• NB: This is not an NCTJ validated course and makes no pretence at providing the full competencies of such. What it will provide will be an introduction to a range of press and related activities within the visual arts and heritage sectors. It will be of relevance for those students considering the possibility of working within these areas and for those who wish to explore some of the practicalities of researching and submitting copy and undertaking related promotional and marketing activities.

• The module will start by considering examples from the range of trade, specialist and institutionally affiliated publications which service the art and heritage markets. It will consider their target readerships, commissioning practices and particular subject and industry angles. Publications such as The Antiques Trade Gazette, The Art Newspaper, Tate Magazine and Art Monthly will be among those evaluated.

• Seminars will introduce some of the basic principles of trade writing: standing up and presenting copy proposals for commissioning; adapting copy to differing house-styles; preparing for and undertaking interviews for writing briefs and useful sources of information for generating ideas for prospective writing projects. Seminars will also consider the arts-related promotional work typically undertaken by press and marketing departments within auction houses, public art galleries and within government-funded organisations such as the British Council, and those local and regional authorities with heritage related responsibilities and sections (Canterbury City Council, Medway Unitary Authority etc).

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA649 - Exposed: The Aesthetics of the Body, Sexuality and Erotic Art

Many pictures, still and moving, in Western society and globally, in high art and demotic culture, incorporate sexual imagery and themes. This module will explore different aesthetic perspectives and theoretical approaches to such images, including those typically classified as pornography and erotica around which much of the existing philosophical literature focuses.
Here are some of the central questions which this module will investigate:

- What is erotic art?
- In which respect and to what extent is it different from pornography?
- What, if anything, is wrong with pornography?
- What is the relation between erotic experience and aesthetic experience and are they at all compatible?
- What are the differences and similarities between voyeurism and aesthetic interest?
- What is the role of transgression in art?
- Are obscenity and art mutually exclusive?

To answer these questions certain fundamental issues in the philosophy of art will need to be addressed. We will therefore engage with current research on the definition of art, the nature of aesthetic value, aesthetic experience, aesthetic properties, the relation between art and morality, the psychology of picture perception, and the role of imagination in art.

However, more is involved than just an abstract philosophical problem. The sexual and the erotic have often caused controversy in the history of art, and especially in the contemporary world of art (construed in the broadest sense) there are many works that consciously explore the boundaries between erotic art and pornography. Any investigation of our central theme would not be complete without a careful examination of such works. Thus, the module will draw on a variety of sources and disciplines (art history, film studies, literary theory, sociology and cultural theory) to study the sexually charged work of traditional, modern and contemporary artists, such as: Titian, Boucher, Courbet, Hokusai, Schiele, John Currin, Robert Mapplethorpe, Thomas Ruff, Nan Goldin, Larry Clark, Nagisa Oshima, Michael Winterbottom, Virginie Despentes, Nicholson Baker, Catherine Millet, Alan Moore.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA653 - Exposed: The Aesthetics of The Body, Sexuality and Erotic Art

Many pictures, still and moving, in Western society and globally, in high art and demotic culture, incorporate sexual imagery and themes. This module will explore different aesthetic perspectives and theoretical approaches to such images, including those typically classified as pornography and erotica around which much of the existing philosophical literature focuses.
Here are some of the central questions which this module will investigate:

- What is erotic art?
- In which respect and to what extent is it different from pornography?
- What, if anything, is wrong with pornography?
- What is the relation between erotic experience and aesthetic experience and are they at all compatible?
- What are the differences and similarities between voyeurism and aesthetic interest?
- What is the role of transgression in art?
- Are obscenity and art mutually exclusive?

To answer these questions certain fundamental issues in the philosophy of art will need to be addressed. We will therefore engage with current research on the definition of art, the nature of aesthetic value, aesthetic experience, aesthetic properties, the relation between art and morality, the psychology of picture perception, and the role of imagination in art.

However, more is involved than just an abstract philosophical problem. The sexual and the erotic have often caused controversy in the history of art, and especially in the contemporary world of art (construed in the broadest sense) there are many works that consciously explore the boundaries between erotic art and pornography. Any investigation of our central theme would not be complete without a careful examination of such works. Thus, the module will draw on a variety of sources and disciplines (art history, film studies, literary theory, sociology and cultural theory) to study the sexually charged work of traditional, modern and contemporary artists, such as: Titian, Boucher, Courbet, Hokusai, Schiele, John Currin, Robert Mapplethorpe, Thomas Ruff, Nan Goldin, Larry Clark, Nagisa Oshima, Michael Winterbottom, Virginie Despentes, Nicholson Baker, Catherine Millet, Alan Moore.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA660 - Dialogues; Art History in a Global Context

Through a selective engagement with particular moments and features of the history of art, visual culture and aesthetic theories this module raises questions about the relationship between western and non-western cultural traditions. The course revolves around a series of discussions about 'encounters' between western and non-western traditions, as well as the appropriations from and differences between their traditions of representational and non-representational art. In examining the influences, appropriations and cross-fertilizations of western and non-western art and culture the course will also place these issues in a broader political and social history of the rise of nationalism, continental trade relations, advents of war, tourism, colonialism and imperialism.

It will look at the nature of 'dialogue' from a critical and art historical perspective, and thus also consider the terms and even the failures of dialogue between the west and non-western traditions; the exclusions, altercations, violations and marginalization of other cultures and their traditions.

The course is built into three broad and interrelated themes or segments.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA669 - Study of a Single Artist

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA670 - Study of a Single Artist

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA681 - Pixelated World: The Digital Revolution

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA682 - Pixelated World: The Digital Revolution

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA683 - Against Realism: Varieties of Photographic Pictorialism

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA684 - Genius: Perspectives on Artistic Creation

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA685 - Genius: Perspectives on Artistic Creation

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA686 - Thinking about the Arts

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA687 - Thinking about the Arts

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA688 - Painting in Central Italy 1440 - 1520

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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HA689 - Painting in Central Italy 1440 - 1520

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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PL526 - Aesthetics

The aim of this module is to provide students with an overview of contemporary work in philosophical aesthetics and an understanding of the central issues that this work addresses. The module will cover the following topics: The Definition of Art; Aesthetic Qualities; The Ontology of Art; Aesthetic Experience; Art, Emotion and Expression; Truth and Representation; Art, Society and Morality; The Evaluation of Art; Criticism and Interpretation.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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PL610 - Aesthetics

The aim of this module is to provide students with an overview of contemporary work in philosophical aesthetics and an understanding of the central issues that this work addresses. The module will cover the following topics: The Definition of Art; Aesthetic Qualities; The Ontology of Art; Aesthetic Experience; Art, Emotion and Expression; Truth and Representation; Art, Society and Morality; The Evaluation of Art; Criticism and Interpretation.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SA503 - A Future for the Welfare State? Social Change, Challenge and Crisis

Welfare states face many challenges in the contemporary world. This course takes a comparative approach by systematically analysing key fields to show how a variety of countries have identified and tackled problems of social policy. It starts with a consideration of theoretical frameworks but most of the course is directed at consideration of welfare issues in different countries and to specific topics: globalisation, migration, population ageing, disability, the cuts and so on. In this way, the student is provided with a systematic overview of some of the main areas in which international and national social policy agendas co evolve. It is intended for students of social policy, social work, and social sciences.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SA519 - The Social Politics of Food

The module provides an introduction to social and political issues raised by food and its provision, exploring how sociologists, social anthropologists and policy analysts have addressed this area. The module examines the role of food within the household and beyond, exploring the ways in which food and food practices make manifest social categorisations such as gender, age, ethnicity and religion. Using the examples of vegetarianism and religion, it examines the way food is entwined with symbolic and moral categorisations. The module as also addresses the political and policy issues raised by food, exploring government involvement in the area of ingestion, drawing parallels between food, alcohol and tobacco. In doing so it addresses the political issues raised by the large corporate interests of the food industry, and the role of the market in shaping provision. It addresses questions of public health, dietary adequacy and the future of the welfare state through sessions on schools meals and food banks.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO683 - Cultural Studies Research Dissertation

The module aims to enable students to conceive and execute a major research project in the field of cultural studies. Students attend a Summer term group meeting with the module convenor to explore and discuss ideas for research and the submission of a draft title and plan, which is to be completed during the long vacation prior to the module beginning. In the Autumn term they will receive feedback on this plan and proposal from their supervisor and/or the module convenor. They will then be required to attend a series of meetings with their assigned supervisor throughout the Autumn term and at the end of that term submit a Literature Review for assessment. In the spring term, research and writing of the dissertation continue under the guidance of the supervisor and at the end of the term, the completed assignment is submitted.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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SO684 - Globalization and Development

This module aims to develop a critical understanding of one of the most important intellectual and political issues of our times, namely, ‘globalization’ and its relationship to development in third world societies. Examples of the central issues to be examined are: what is ‘globalization’ and what forms does it take? What are the most important global institutions today, and how do they affect poverty, inequality, the growth of middle classes, consumption,politics and identities in ‘developing’ societies in Asia, Africa and Latin America? What effects do global economic treaties under the WTO, IMF etc have upon rural poverty, migration, trade, and urban growth? Why are third worldcities expanding at such a rapid rate, and what consequences does this have? Finally, how can we use the ‘antiglobalization’ movements to critically evaluate contending theories and practices of globalization?

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO689 - Drugs, Culture and Control

This module will be divided into three parts: the first will offer an analysis of current and potential methods of drug control; the second will explore cultural contexts of illicit drug use within modern society; the third will consider and evaluate practical issues facing drug policy makers of today. Each will be considered in a global context. Particular emphasis will be placed on theoretical arguments underpinning the major debates in this field and up-to-date research will be drawn upon throughout.

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO709 - Modern Chinese Societies

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO710 - War, Atrocity and Genocide

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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SO712 - Urban Sociology

Credits: 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits).

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TH570 - I:Religion and Film

This course will explore the growing field of religion and film. Students will become conversant in the language of cinema, and specific focus will be on the range of models by which film and religion may be employed as possible dialogue partners. Students will be provided with the tools necessary for exploring critical links between religion, theology and the medium of film. The course will begin with an examination of the methodological, conceptual and disciplinary issues that arise before exploring in critical depth the historical relationship between religion and film, with specific reference to the reception (ranging from prohibition to utilisation) of film by the Christian Churches. There will be a focus on particular categories of film and categories and models of theological understanding, allowing students to develop the critical skills helpful for film interpretation and for exploring possible theological approaches to film criticism.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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TH574 - H:Religion and Film

This course will explore the growing field of religion and film. Students will become conversant in the language of cinema, and specific focus will be on the range of models by which film and religion may be employed as possible dialogue partners. Students will be provided with the tools necessary for exploring critical links between religion, theology and the medium of film. The course will begin with an examination of the methodological, conceptual and disciplinary issues that arise before exploring in critical depth the historical relationship between religion and film, with specific reference to the reception (ranging from prohibition to utilisation) of film by the Christian Churches. There will be a focus on particular categories of film and categories and models of theological understanding, allowing students to develop the critical skills helpful for film interpretation and for exploring possible theological approaches to film criticism.

Credits: 30 credits (15 ECTS credits).

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You have the opportunity to select wild modules in this stage

Teaching & Assessment

Cultural Studies

Modules are usually taught by a combination of lectures and seminars, and you can always consult the lecturers for individual advice outside of formal teaching. Additionally, a wide range of study skills sessions are available to all students throughout each year of study.

Coursework is continuously assessed at Stage 1, and this is combined with the results of exams, in most modules. At Stage 2/3, modules are assessed by a combination of essays (50%) and exams (50%). All single honours students and some joint honours students also have the opportunity to do a final-year dissertation on a chosen subject, which counts as one module (and does not involve an exam).

Social Anthropology

Most modules are  taught by a combination of lectures and seminars and also involve individual study using library resources and, where relevant, laboratories and computer-based learning packages. If you are taking modules involving computing or learning a language, you have additional workshop time.

Assessment ranges from 80:20 exam/coursework to 100% coursework. At Stages 2 and 3, most core modules are split 50% end-of-year examination and 50% coursework. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks and, where appropriate, the marks for your year abroad count towards your final degree result.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • provide students with a broad range of knowledge in the major sub-divisions of anthropology, showing how it is closely linked to other academic disciplines
  • acquaint students with theoretical and methodological issues relevant to understanding the discipline
  • demonstrate to students the relevance of anthropological knowledge to an understanding of a variety of local, national and international issues
  • facilitate the educational experience of students through the provision of appropriate pedagogical opportunities for learning
  • develop students’ transferable skills and prepare graduates for employment and/or further study in their chosen careers
  • ensure that the research of the School staff informs the design of modules, and their content and delivery in ways which are conducive to achieving the national benchmarks of the discipline in a manner which is efficient and reliable, and enjoyable to students.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • social anthropology as the comparative study of human societies
  • specific themes in social anthropology, for example, religion, politics, kinship, nationalism and ethnicity
  • human diversity and an appreciation of its scope
  • several ethnographic regions of the world including Central Asia, the Mediterranean, Amazonia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific
  • the history of the development of anthropology as a discipline
  • the variety of theoretical approaches contained within the discipline
  • the process of historical and social change
  • the application of anthropology to understanding issues of social and economic development throughout the world
  • the relevance of anthropology to understanding everyday processes of social life anywhere in the world.

Intellectual skills

You develop the following intellectual skills:

  • general learning and study skills
  • the ability to think critically and analytically
  • the ability to express ideas in writing and orally
  • communication 
  • group work
  • computing
  • the ability to review and summarise information
  • data retrieval ability.

Subject-specific skills

You gain the following subject-specific skills:

  • understanding how people are shaped by their social, cultural and physical environments while nonetheless possessing a capacity for individual agency which can allow them to transcend environmental constraints
  • the recognition of the pertinence of an anthropological perspective to understanding major national and international events
  • the ability to interpret texts and performance by locating them within appropriate cultural and historical contexts
  • competence in using anthropological theories and perspectives in the presentation of information and argument
  • the ability to identify and analyse the significance of the social and cultural contexts of language use
  • the ability to devise questions for research and study which are anthropologically informed
  • the ability to perceive the way in which cultural assumptions may affect the opinions of others and oneself.
  • an openness to trying to make rational sense of cultural and social phenomena which may appear at first sight incomprehensible.

Transferable skills

You gain the following transferable skills:

  • communication: organising and summarising information; responding critically to written information; making a structured argument in written and oral form
  • Problem-solving: identifying problems; formulating ways of problem-solving; evaluating alternative solutions
  • Improving own learning: management of time available; awareness of strengths and weaknesses; development of personal learning strategies; ability to conduct independent research
  • Information technology: accessing information on the internet; producing documents; using databases; using technology for oral presentations and online portfolio development
  • Group work: participation in joint learning and communication; sharing ideas and skills; understanding group dynamics.

Careers

Cultural Studies

Cultural Studies provides a useful background for a wide range of careers. The skills you acquire, such as improved communication skills, the ability to work as part of a team and independently, the ability to analyse complex ideas and the confidence to offer your own innovative solutions, are all considered essential attributes by graduate employers. The programmes are especially good preparation for professional or postgraduate training in the media and cultural industries.

Our graduates take up careers in advertising and design, journalism, broadcasting, teaching, arts administration, publishing, public relations, research, information services, leisure industry management, tourism and heritage, personnel, local government, and the organisation of social and community projects.

Social Anthropology

Studying social anthropology gives you an exciting range of career opportunities. We work with you to help direct your module choices to the career paths you are considering. Through your studies you learn how to work independently, to analyse complex data and to present your work with clarity and flair.

Our recent graduates have gone into areas such as overseas development and aid work, further research in social anthropology, social sciences research, media research or production (TV and radio), journalism, advertising, social work, education, international consultancy and work with community groups.

For more information on the services Kent provides you to improve your career prospects visit www.kent.ac.uk/employability.

Funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to support eligible undergraduate students during their studies. Our 2014 financial support package includes a £6,500 cash bursary. Find out more about the support package, eligibility and terms and conditions on our fees and funding pages.

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created a new scholarship, The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence, which will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications as specified on our funding pages.

Enquire or order a prospectus

Download a prospectus (PDF - 2MB) or order one below.

Contacts

Related schools

Enquiries

T: +44 (0)1227 827272

Resources

Download a subject leaflet (pdf)

Our subject leaflets provide more detail about individual subjects areas. See:

Read our student profiles

Open days

Our general open days will give you a flavour of what it is like to be an undergraduate, postgraduate or part-time student at Kent. They include a programme of talks for undergraduate students, with subject lectures and demonstrations, plus self-guided walking tours of the campus and accommodation.

Our next open days are:

  • Saturday 21 June 2014 – Medway
  • Saturday 12 July 2014 – Canterbury

Please check which of our locations offers the courses you are interested in before choosing which event to attend.

Related courses

UNISTATS / KIS

Key Information Sets

The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.

Fees

Every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in publicity materials is fair and accurate at the time of going to press. However, the courses, services and other matter covered by web pages and prospectuses are subject to change from time to time and no guarantee can be given that changes will not be made following publication and/or after candidates have been admitted to the University. Please see www.kent.ac.uk/applicants/information/policies/disclaimer for further information. Please note that modules shown are based on the current curriculum but are subject to change.