Students preparing for their graduation ceremony at Canterbury Cathedral

Marketing with a Year in Industry - BSc (Hons)

UCAS code N501

2017

Marketing is a fascinating area to study and an integral function of most organisations. Our Marketing degree involves research, strategic planning, brand and consumer analysis, and digital communication. If you are open to new ideas, persuasive, imaginative and a good communicator, you will enjoy our Marketing degree.

Overview

Accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing, our degree benefits from our strong links with industry and the research expertise of our staff.

Kent Business School (KBS) is a top 20 UK business school for academic teaching, student satisfaction and graduate employment prospects. You are taught by specialist lecturers, as well as by leading experts currently in business.

As a student at Kent Business School, you also have the opportunity to gain the Chartered Management Institute’s (CMI) Level 5 Professional Diploma in Management and Leadership alongside your degree.

Our degree programme

In your first year, you study accounting, management, financial reports and statistics for business, and are given a detailed introduction to marketing in a global context.

In your second and final years, you can choose from a range of modules related to marketing, which cover strategy, research, digital marketing, international marketing, branding and enterprise. Alongside your specialist marketing modules, you can choose modules from a selection that covers all aspects of business management.

Year in industry

You spend a year working between your second and final year – we have a Placement Officer who can give advice and guidance. In previous years, students have spent their year in industry with:

  • Chase Anderson
  • Cummins Power Generation
  • Deloitte
  • Enterprise Rent-A-Car
  • General Electric
  • IBM
  • KPMG
  • Microsoft
  • Lloyds Banking Group
  • Unilever.

Students have also worked in corporations in Athens, Dubai, Ghana, Hong Kong, Mauritius and Shanghai.

Spending a year in industry gives you invaluable workplace experience, which greatly enhances your employment prospects and also helps you in your final year at university, allowing you to put your academic learning into a real-world context. 

You have the option to take this programme as a three-year degree, without the year in industry. For details, see Marketing.

Extra activities

There are a number of student-run Kent Business and Kent Enterprise societies for you to join. These organise regular events with guest speakers from industry and support budding entrepreneurs with their ventures.

Alongside your lectures and seminars, you can also interact directly with the business community. Special events and schemes offered in previous years within Kent Business School include:

  • workshops and seminars
  • business challenges
  • enterprise initiatives, including the Business Start-Up Journey
  • networking events.

Professional network

Kent Business School has long-established links with business schools in China, Hong Kong, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Finland. We also have excellent links with local, national and international businesses.

Independent rankings

Marketing at Kent was ranked 12th in The Complete University Guide 2017. In the National Student Survey 2016, Marketing at Kent was 13th for overall satisfaction.

Marketing students who graduated from Kent in 2015 were the most successful in the UK at finding work or further study opportunities (DLHE).

Course structure

The course structure provides a sample of the modules available for this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University in order that you may explore other subject areas of interest to you or that may further enhance your employability.

Based on sector research, the following innovative new modules are now offered:

CB756 - Digital Information Systems: A Management Perspective
CB734 - Introduction to Social Marketing

The following modules are offered to our current students. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation:

Stage 1

Modules may include Credits

Topics the module will cover include:

• Orientation to studying at university, time management and learning styles.

• Research and cognitive development (writing essays and reports in higher education, research and referencing, plagiarism, how to make a reasoned argument, literature searches and introduction to critical and analytical thinking).

• The theories underlying personal skill development needed to achieve success at university and in the workplace (i.e. effective communication; working in groups, teamwork, problem solving, creative thinking, conflict management and negotiation).

• Personal Development Planning for Employability (including career search, CV writing, and making sense of employer skills requirements).

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15

The module introduces students to theories of management, beginning with classical management systems through to contemporary management concepts. It will illustrate the continuities and transformations in management thinking throughout the 20th and 21st century. The main topics of study include:

• Scientific Management

• The Human Relations School

• Bureaucracy

• Post Bureaucratic Organizations

• The Contingency Approach

• Culture Management

• Leadership

• Decision-Making

• Managing Ethically

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15

So much of the world of business is based on quantitative information—sales, stock control, investments, loans, production levels, staffing numbers, share prices, interest rates, quality control, etc. etc. In almost any organisation where you work you must expect to deal with numbers. This module introduces you to the way you can make use of quantitative information through statistical analysis.

Topics may include:

The nature and use of numerical information

• Summarising data

• Graphical representation of data: histograms, pie charts, cumulative frequency curves

• Measures of location and dispersion

• Probability, distributions and expected values

• Sampling and its uses

• The ?2 distribution, questionnaire analysis and contingency tables

• Correlation

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15

The module will cover various aspects of the changing global environment. An indicative list of topics is given below, however the main aim of the module is to examine contemporary issues within the global business environment that are likely to impact upon business operations and strategy:

• Globalisation: Definition, Evolution, Implications for countries, firms and people,

• The Triad: European Union, United States, Japan - Investment, Trade, Relations

• International Capital and Financial Markets: New York, London, Frankfurt, Tokyo

• World Institutions: World Trade Organisation, International Monetary Fund, United Nations

• International Economic Environment: Exchange Rates and patterns of trade

• Environment: Global Warming – Kyoto Agreement

• Business and Corporate Culture: Japan & Germany VS UK & US

• Innovation & Technology

• Mergers and Acquisitions

• Firm and Stakeholders - Ethical Issues

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15

An indicative set of topics to be covered within the module are outlined below.

• Basic Spreadsheet Functionalities: Introduction to common spreadsheet features: workbooks, worksheets, menus, cells, rows, columns, data types, relative and absolute cell addressing, copying, basic formulae, naming cells, formatting, charts and graphs, printing.

• Data Management Facilities: sorting, filtering, data forms, pivot tables.

• What-If Analysis: scenario manager, goal seek, data tables.

• Basic Financial Analysis: Introduction to basic financial analysis and how to carry this out using spreadsheets: compound interest, discounting, NPV, IRR, loans and mortgages.

• Advanced Spreadsheet Functionalities: automating tasks and solving simple optimisation business problems.

• The Art of Modelling: effective methods for designing, building and testing business models.

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15

The module will begin with an introduction to the link between business and accounting in order to show the value to the students of their having some knowledge of accounting. The module is designed to teach students how to prepare, read and interpret financial information with a view to their being future business managers rather than accountants.

The module will continue with a brief demonstration of double-entry bookkeeping. Students will not be examined on this, it is merely to put bookkeeping and accounting in context. Following on from this, students will be shown how to prepare financial statements from a trial balance and make adjustments to the figures given by acting on information given in a short scenario.

The regulatory framework of financial reporting will be considered as will the annual reports and accounts of a variety of organisations. The module will finish will an analysis of financial statements with students shown how to interpret data and make sensible recommendations

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A synopsis of the curriculum

The module introduces to students the importance of marketing in competitive and dynamic environments.

The key topics of the module are:

• The marketing concept

• The marketing environment

• Market segmentation & targeting

• Brand development and management

• Management of the marketing mix

o Product; including new product development and the marketing of services

o Pricing

o Promotion; including digital media, advertising, sales promotion, publicity, PR, personal sales et al.

o Place

o Extended marketing mix; including people, physical evidence and process

• Ethical issues in marketing

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15

This module is designed for students who have not studied Microeconomics for Business before or who have not previously completed a comprehensive introductory course in economics. However, the content is such that it is also appropriate for students with A-level Economics or equivalent, as it focuses on the analysis, tools and knowledge of microeconomics for business. The module applies economics to business issues and each topic is introduced assuming no previous knowledge of the subject. The lectures and related seminar programme explain the economic principles underlying the analysis of each topic and relate the theory to the real world and business examples. In particular, many examples are taken from the real world to show how economic analysis and models can be used to understand the different parts of business and how policy has been used to intervene in the working of the economy. Workshops are included in the module to apply economic analysis and techniques to business situations. The module is carefully designed to tell you what topics are covered under each major subject area, to give readings for these subjects, and to provide a list of different types of questions to test and extend your understanding of the material.

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15

Stage 2

Modules may include Credits

Business ethics and sustainability are central to contemporary management and thus this module will explore the following topics:

• History, definitions and timeline of society's view on business ethics and sustainability

• Cross-disciplinary approaches to ethics and sustainability

• Role of globalisation, policy and culture

• Ethics and ethical dilemmas

• Change Management, Values, Governance and Leadership

• Sustainable Business Models

• Social Innovation

• Partnerships and collaboration

• Responsible Supply Chain Management

• Environmental Assessment Frameworks and Sustainable Management in practice

• Sustainable Supply Chain Management

• Innovation and creativity

• The role and responses of Corporations, SMEs, Public and not-for-profit organisations

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15

This module aims to provide students with understanding and experience of the theory and practice of marketing research. During the module students design and implement a marketing research plan, design a questionnaire, collect and analyse data, prepare an oral presentation and write a marketing research report.

The main topics of study are as follows:

• Introduction to marketing research: Defining and designing marketing research projects

• Understanding data: Secondary data and databases

• Primary data collection techniques.

• Questionnaire design

• Measurement and measurement scales and error.

• Sampling and sample design and error

• Entering and coding data with SPSS

• Data analysis techniques

• Communicating the results of marketing research.

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15

This module aims to develop a critical understanding of the role of digital marketing in modern organisations. The module considers what digital marketing strategy means looking at a range of examples across business sectors. Core areas are looked at including the technologies which make digital marketing possible, the relationship between digital marketing strategies and the wider organisation, the key issues in the development and implementation of digital marketing strategies and the threats, security and other, posed by digital marketing.

The following topics may be covered:

Enabling technologies for e-commerce: The Digital Marketing Environment, Digital Marketing Strategy; The Internet and the World Wide Web; Mobile platforms; Dot com and multi-channel; Social Media and Web 2.0; Database and data warehouses; Web site design and management; Marketplaces; B2B Digital Marketing; Business Models and Innovation.

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15

This module introduces students to core concepts and theories about decision-making, behaviour and consumption, including individual and organisational perspectives. It is based around understanding how purchase and consumption decision is made and the influential factors affect decision-making process and subsequent behaviours. This module will include:

Introduction to Buying behaviour – Buyer, User, and Consumer

Decision Making Theories

Needs, Wants, Motivation and Involvement

Learning Theories and Perception

Attitude Theories and Consumption

Affect, Perceived Risk and Buying Behaviour

Social Influence

Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning

Organizational Buying Behaviour

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15

Creativity, Innovation and Organisation aims to provide a critical understanding of the challenges of managing creativity and innovation within contemporary organisations. The experience of work and employment, management practices are affected by rapid technological change, intensifying global competition and changing demographic profiles and values of the work force. Contemporary organisations are pressurised to tackle these developments through creativity, innovation and new organisational forms.

This module examines the nature, antecedents, processes and consequences of creativity and innovation and their complex links with organisation, while also exploring major social and technological changes relating these to organisational creativity and innovation. Students will be introduced to the main concepts and theories on creativity, innovation and organisation through readings and discussions of the main themes and debates in the field. Case studies will be used to illustrate how these concepts are connected together and how they could impact upon management decision making within contemporary organisations. Students will be encouraged:

• To explore some of the most notable historical and contemporary shifts in media and technology and discover how new organisational forms and methods have been devised to exploit them

• To develop awareness for the cross-fertilisation between disciplines in analyzing the dynamics of creativity, innovation and organisation and their complex relationships.

Key topics of the module include:

• Conceptual foundations of creativity, innovation and organisation

• Personality and individual creativity

• Organisational creativity and innovation

• Cognition, knowledge and creativity

• Models and processes of innovation

• Organisational culture and systems for supporting creativity and innovation

• Leadership and entrepreneurship

• Creative organisations across fields/ industries

• Socio-technological change and new forms of organisation.

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15

The module introduces to students the importance of marketing in competitive and dynamic environments.

• Introduction to strategic marketing – corporate vs. marketing strategies

• Identify and assess marketing ethics dilemmas

• Auditing the external and the internal environments

• Marketing information

• Identifying consumer and business segments

• Formulating marketing goals and specific objectives

• Developing a marketing plan for a commercial or a social organization

• Define adequate control and performance indicators to control the marketing plan

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15

The module provides a broad, basic understanding of strategy and strategic management, on which further strategic analysis and exploration of strategic issues can be built. It introduces students to the key vocabulary, concepts and frameworks of strategic management and establishes criteria for assessing whether or not a strategy can be successful. It introduces students to frameworks for analysing the external and internal environments and to different theories of how these relate and of their impact on strategy formulation and implementation.

Students will learn how to identify strategic issues, develop strategic options to address them and decide which option(s) to recommend. Through theoretical readings and case studies, students will develop an appreciation of strategy in different contexts and from different perspectives and of the complexity of strategic decision-making. Students will enhance their ability to read business articles from a strategic perspective and to present strategic arguments in a structured manner

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15

This module introduces students to core theories about brand, branding and brand management as well as contemporary issues related to branding and brand management. It is based around understanding what brand, branding, and brand management are and illustrating effective brand management practices through a systematic and strategic branding process. This module will include:

• Introduction to Brand and Branding

• Brand positioning and values

• Brand loyalty and brand equity

• Plan and build brand equity

• Brand performance

• New products and brand extensions

• Manage brand over time

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15

Year in industry

You spend a year in industry, supported by a dedicated placement team and a programme designed to ensure that you gain experience in the functional areas and industries of your choice.

The placement allows you to experience, first hand, many of the issues addressed in the taught programme and to use the tools, techniques and applications in a real business setting. It will become a vital component of your CV and will give you a distinct advantage over other business graduates.

Modules may include Credits

Synopsis of the curriculum

  • The placement provides you with a structured opportunity to combine work experience with academic study.

  • It allows you to develop and reflect on managerial and/or professional practice in real and often complex situations, and to integrate this with the study of the relevant subject(s) of your main degree programme.

  • Where relevant, you develop, reinforce and apply professional and/or technical expertise in an employment context.
  • The placement report requires you to integrate theory and practice, and to show how you have developed as an independent learner able to reflect effectively on what you are doing.

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    Synopsis of the curriculum

  • The placement experience provides you with a structured opportunity to combine work experience with academic study.

  • It allows you to develop and reflect on managerial and/or professional practice in real and often complex situations, and to integrate this with the study of the relevant subject(s) of your main degree programme.

  • Where relevant, you develop, reinforce and apply professional and/or technical expertise in an employment context. The placement portfolio requires you to document your experiences in relation to both your university studies as well as to a wide range of employability skills.

  • In addition, the portfolio allows demonstration of professional development through the collection and presentation of relevant evidence.

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    Stage 3

    Modules may include Credits

    The aim of the module is to provide students with an opportunity for an in depth independent study of an aspect of marketing management chosen by the student in agreement with the convenor and supervisor. It also aims to develop student's research, writing and communication skills.

    The topics covered will include:

    • Developing marketing plans and strategies

    • Literature search and data collection

    • Use and analysis of consumer research and market information

    • Preparing and structuring the Marketing Report

    • Referencing, Citations and Developing writing skills

    • Presentation skills

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    30

    This module will extend students' knowledge and understanding of strategic management and strategic issues. It will introduce a range of contemporary issues associated with the formulation and implementation of corporate and business strategies with an emphasis on identifying and implementing strategic change within the organisation, building dynamic capabilities and developing coherent strategies. Issues might include strategies for a recession, global strategies, knowledge-based strategies, firms and industries, strategies where profit is of secondary (or no) importance. The module will also extend students’ theoretical knowledge by presenting contemporary debates and issues in strategic thinking. The module will use a project in which students identify and suggest possible strategic solutions to a strategic issue in a real organisation to develop students’ ability to link theory and practice in real-life situations.

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    15

    This module introduces students to core theories about innovation and new product marketing. It is based around understanding what a new product is and illustrating effective new product marketing practices through a systematic new product marketing process. It will include:

    New Products Marketing and Innovation

    New Product Strategies

    Models on New Product Development

    Market research and its influence on New Product Development

    Managing the new product development process from idea generation to commercialisation

    The marketing/R&D interface

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    15

    The module looks at how digital marketing applications can be used by modern organisations. The module considers the fundamental technologies that support digital marketing along with the regulatory and societal challenges that must be taken into account, for example, privacy and data protection. The methods available to attract customers through digital marketing are covered making a distinction between paid methods, such as sponsored search, and non-paid methods, such as an organisation's own social media assets. Issues around loyalty are considered especially in the context of falling search costs which enable customers to switch providers.

    The unique nature of digital products, for example music downloads or video streaming, are outlined with the marketing challenges and opportunities this presents. The module stresses the importance of implementation, using applied examples, and the uncertainty involved.

    The digital marketing environment; Enabling technologies for digital marketing; Website design, implementation and analysis; Social media; Social commerce; Customers in the Internet age: knowing, reaching & retaining the customer; Network effects and versioning; Loyalty, Customer Relationship Management and Data Mining; E-Marketing campaigns; Brands in the Internet age; Data protection, privacy and legal issues; Digital marketing and globalisation

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    15

    The module will provide students with the tools of marketing communications. Specifically students taking this module will be able to evaluate strengths and weakness of marketing communications channels. Over the course of a term the module will provide students with an understanding of the principles, methods and strategies of marketing communications. The main tools of marketing communications will be discussed as well as their suitability and effectiveness:

    Topics may cover:

    • The communications process

    • Advertising

    • Strategy and media planning

    • Image, brand management and packaging

    • Direct marketing

    • Digital and interactive media

    • Sales promotion, merchandising and point of sale

    • Public relations and corporate identity

    • Exhibitions, trade shows, product placement and sponsorship

    • Personal selling

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    15

    This module will provide students with the tools to promote voluntary behaviour change. Specifically students taking this module will be able to identify health, environmental, social-economic related issues where behavioural changes can significantly impact present and future social outcomes. Over the course of the term the module will provide students with a toolbox to assess and affect behavioural change based around marketing principles and the "social marketing approach" This will cover basic issues in the design, implementation and evaluation of social marketing initiatives. Sessions in this module will cover:

    • What is social marketing? Definitions and frameworks.

    • What is the scope of social marketing? Topics and Themes.

    • Who does social marketing? Topology of organizations involved I social marketing and how it affects programs.

    • External barrier and drivers of social change.

    • Who are we trying to change?

    • What ethical issues emerge when we foster Identifying and characterizing the subjects of social marketing campaigns

    • Designing and implementing social marketing programmes.

    • Evaluating social marketing programs.

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    15

    This module will introduce students to the key concepts, theories and issues involved in international marketing. In doing so it will enable students to understand how to identify and evaluate opportunities in international markets and assess the different market entry modes available to companies. In addition students will consider the need to adapt marketing mix elements for different international markets.

    The main topics of study are as follows:

    • Introduction to international marketing: Definitions, theories, approaches and motives.

    • International Marketing Research

    • Assessing international markets: The political and economic environment

    • Assessing international markets: The Sociocultural environment

    • Theories and frameworks for International market evaluation and selection

    • Market entry modes: export, intermediate and hierarchical

    • International marketing plans and strategy: Segmentation, targeting and positioning

    • Designing the global marketing mix: Product, pricing, communication and distribution decisions

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    15

    Teaching and assessment

    We use a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, case-study analysis, group projects and presentations, and computer-based situations. You have approximately 12 hours of class time per week, and regular access to an academic adviser for advice on any matter concerning your studies or your performance on the course.

    Assessment is by a mixture of coursework and end-of-module examinations, with the examinations normally counting for up to 70% of the marks for each module.

    Programme aims

    The programme aims to:

    • develop understanding and knowledge of a broad range of organisations, their management and marketing strategies, and the changing international environment in which they operate
    • educate to marketing specialist level through a multidisciplinary approach to understanding regional and international markets and customers
    • develop the ability to critically apply marketing and management theories in a range of different contexts
    • provide an academic preparation for further study/research or a career in marketing and/or management
    • meet the requirements for accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) on successful completion of the programme
    • provide flexibility and a multidisciplinary approach to marketing and management issues through critical insights from the social sciences
    • maintain high standards of academic rigour, currency and innovation
    • provide a sound academic base from which students may continue to benefit from lifelong learning skills and personal development
    • build on the University’s close ties with institutions in Europe and more widely
    • support sustainable national and regional economic success
    • provide a structured opportunity to combine developmental work experience with academic study (through the year in industry).

    Learning outcomes

    Knowledge and understanding

    You gain knowledge and understanding of:

    • organisations, their environments and the management of people, operations, finance, marketing and organisational strategy
    • markets, customers and brands
    • the concepts, processes and institutions in the production of goods and/or services
    • the relevant traditional and contemporary approaches (such as new media) to communicating with customers and other stakeholders in a global environment, to fulfil organisational objectives
    • a range of marketing and business research methods/techniques (qualitative and quantitative) to make informed decisions and appropriate marketing strategies to meet stakeholder interests
    • relevant forms of IT and their application to and effects on markets and marketing in a global environment to fulfil organisational objectives
    • contemporary and pervasive issues, which change over time
    • aspects of the compulsory modules applied in a practical business/management context.

    Intellectual skills

    You gain the ability to:

    • search, select, organise, develop and synthesise complex material
    • critically evaluate arguments and evidence
    • analyse and draw reasoned conclusions to structured and unstructured problems
    • plan, work and study independently
    • apply core numeracy and IT skills to problems
    • apply these skills within a practical business/management context.

    Subject-specific skills

    You gain the ability to:

    • identify, formulate and solve business problems using qualitative and quantitative tools
    • create, evaluate and assess options in a range of business situations, applying concepts and knowledge
    • conduct research into marketing/management issues for project work, using a variety of sources and methodologies
    • identify, find, record, organise and manipulate knowledge relevant to the subject
    • apply these skills within a practical business/management context.

    Transferable skills

    You gain the ability to:

    • identify and use information from various sources to assess ideas
    • communicate well, orally and in writing, using a range of media
    • be an effective self manager of time, planning and delivering outputs
    • work in groups and apply other interpersonal skills
    • make good use of numeracy and IT skills
    • apply these skills within a practical business/management context.

    Careers

    Graduate destinations

    Our Marketing graduates work in public and private sector management and consultancy, both overseas and in the UK. Some find work in management consultancy companies and media agencies, while others start their own businesses.

    Recent graduates have gone on to take up positions in a wide range of organisations, including:

    • Deloitte
    • KPMG
    • PwC
    • Lloyds Bank
    • Sainsbury’s
    • Tesco
    • Transport for London
    • Yahoo! UK
    • Thames Valley Police
    • Heineken.

    Help finding a job

    Kent Business School has an excellent international reputation and good links with businesses globally. This network is very useful to students when looking for work in industry.

    The University also has a friendly Careers and Employability Service, which can give you advice on how to:

    • apply for jobs
    • write a good CV
    • perform well in interviews.

    Career-enhancing skills

    Marketing gives you a solid grounding in core business management concepts, theories and skills, with a particular focus on global business.

    To help you appeal to employers, you also learn key transferable skills that are essential for all graduates. These include the ability to:

    • think critically
    • communicate your ideas and opinions
    • manage your time effectively
    • work independently or as part of a team
    • find imaginative solutions to business challenges.

    You can also gain skills by signing up for one of our Kent Extra activities, such as adding much-sought-after analytical skills to your degree via Kent’s Q-Step Centre or learning a language.

    Professional recognition

    Kent Business School has also joined forces with the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) to give students the opportunity to gain professional qualifications through the CIM Graduate Gateway. CIM qualifications are highly sought after by employers.

    Independent rankings

    According to Which? University (2017), the average starting salary for graduates of this degree is ‘high’ at £22,000.

    Marketing students who graduated from Kent in 2015 were the most successful in the UK at finding work or further study opportunities (DLHE).

    Entry requirements

    Home/EU students

    The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications. Students offering alternative qualifications should contact us for further advice. 

    It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

    New GCSE grades

    If you’ve taken exams under the new GCSE grading system, please see our conversion table to convert your GCSE grades.

    International students

    The University welcomes applications from international students. Our international recruitment team can guide you on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about entry requirements for your country.

    If you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes.

    Meet our staff in your country

    For more advise about applying to Kent, you can meet our staff at a range of international events. 

    English Language Requirements

    Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

    Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of 'pre-sessional' courses in English for Academic Purposes. You attend these courses before starting your degree programme. 

    General entry requirements

    Please also see our general entry requirements.

    Fees

    The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

    UK/EU Overseas
    Full-time £9250 £13810

    UK/EU fee paying students

    The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

    In accordance with changes announced by the UK Government, we are increasing our 2017/18 regulated full-time tuition fees for new and returning UK/EU fee paying undergraduates from £9,000 to £9,250. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise from £4,500 to £4,625. This was subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. This fee will ensure the continued provision of high-quality education.

    For students continuing on this programme, fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* 

    The University will assess your fee status as part of the application process. If you are uncertain about your fee status you may wish to seek advice from UKCISA before applying.

    Fees for Year Abroad/Industry

    As a guide only, UK/EU/International students on an approved year abroad for the full 2017/18 academic year pay an annual fee of £1,350 to Kent for that year. Students studying abroad for less than one academic year will pay full fees according to their fee status. 

    Please note that for 2017/18 entrants the University will increase the standard year in industry fee for home/EU/international students to £1,350.

    General additional costs

    Find out more about accommodation and living costs, plus general additional costs that you may pay when studying at Kent.

    Funding

    University funding

    Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. See our funding page for more details. 

    Government funding

    You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

    The Government has confirmed that EU students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year will still have access to student funding support for the duration of their course.

    Scholarships

    General scholarships

    Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

    The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

    At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. The scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications (including BTEC and IB) as specified on our scholarships pages.

    The scholarship is also extended to those who achieve AAB at A level (or specified equivalents) where one of the subjects is either Mathematics or a Modern Foreign Language. Please review the eligibility criteria.

    The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

    If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.