International Business

International Business - BSc (Hons)

UCAS code N126

2017

Business is global; to be successful you need to understand international cultures and markets and adapt your business to their needs. As an International Business student at Kent, you develop the essential business skills to lead any business anywhere.

Overview

The International Business programme is taught in Kent Business School (KBS) in a brand-new building, providing modern study facilities. KBS is a top 20 UK business school for academic teaching, student satisfaction and graduate employment prospects. We provide a friendly, student-focused environment, which helps you to make the most of your studies.

You benefit from our global links and the international make-up of our staff and students. You are taught by lecturers with experience in a range of management disciplines, as well as by leading experts currently in business.

As a student at Kent Business School, you also have the opportunity to gain the Chartered Management Institute’s (CMI) Level 5 Professional Diploma in Management and Leadership alongside your degree.

Our degree programme

In your first year, you are introduced to all aspects of business including accounting, financial reporting, business modelling and the global business environment.

In your second and final years, you cover international business strategy, business ethics, operations management, innovation, strategy analysis and interactive decision modelling. You can also focus on areas you are particularly interested in, such as new product marketing, international entrepreneurship and enterprise.

Year in industry

You have the option to take this programme with a year in industry. For more details, see International Business with a Year in Industry.

You don’t have to make a decision before you enrol at Kent but certain conditions apply.

Year abroad

If you would like to spend a year studying or working abroad, see International Business with a Year Abroad.

You don’t have to make a decision before you enrol at Kent but certain conditions apply.

Extra activities

You can also get involved with the student-run Kent Business and Kent Enterprise societies, which in previous years have organised regular events with guest speakers from industry and supported budding entrepreneurs with their ventures.

Alongside your lectures and seminars, Kent Business School gives you many opportunities to interact directly with the business community. Special events and schemes have previously included:

  • workshops and seminars
  • business challenges
  • enterprise initiatives, including the Business Start-Up Journey
  • networking events.

Professional network

Kent Business School has long-established links with business schools in China, Hong Kong, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Finland. We also have excellent links with local, national and international businesses.

Independent rankings

In the National Student Survey 2016, Business Studies at Kent was ranked 15th for overall satisfaction. Business Studies at Kent was ranked 17th in The Times Good University Guide 2017.

Of Business Studies students who graduated from Kent in 2015, 93% were in work or further study within six months (DLHE). Business Studies at Kent was ranked 16th for graduate prospects in The Times Good University Guide 2017.

Course structure

The course structure provides a sample of the modules available for this programme. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.  Most programmes require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take ‘wild’ modules from other programmes offered by the University.

Based on ongoing sector research, new or updated modules for 2016/17 will include, subject to final approval:

CB756 - Digital Information Systems: A Management Perspective

The following modules are offered to our current students. This listing is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation:

Stage 1

Modules may include Credits

This module is designed for students who have not studied Microeconomics for Business before or who have not previously completed a comprehensive introductory course in economics. However, the content is such that it is also appropriate for students with A-level Economics or equivalent, as it focuses on the analysis, tools and knowledge of microeconomics for business. The module applies economics to business issues and each topic is introduced assuming no previous knowledge of the subject. The lectures and related seminar programme explain the economic principles underlying the analysis of each topic and relate the theory to the real world and business examples. In particular, many examples are taken from the real world to show how economic analysis and models can be used to understand the different parts of business and how policy has been used to intervene in the working of the economy. Workshops are included in the module to apply economic analysis and techniques to business situations. The module is carefully designed to tell you what topics are covered under each major subject area, to give readings for these subjects, and to provide a list of different types of questions to test and extend your understanding of the material.

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The module introduces students to theories of management, beginning with classical management systems through to contemporary management concepts. It will illustrate the continuities and transformations in management thinking throughout the 20th and 21st century. The main topics of study include:

• Scientific Management

• The Human Relations School

• Bureaucracy

• Post Bureaucratic Organizations

• The Contingency Approach

• Culture Management

• Leadership

• Decision-Making

• Managing Ethically

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15

The module will cover various aspects of the changing global environment. An indicative list of topics is given below, however the main aim of the module is to examine contemporary issues within the global business environment that are likely to impact upon business operations and strategy:

• Globalisation: Definition, Evolution, Implications for countries, firms and people,

• The Triad: European Union, United States, Japan - Investment, Trade, Relations

• International Capital and Financial Markets: New York, London, Frankfurt, Tokyo

• World Institutions: World Trade Organisation, International Monetary Fund, United Nations

• International Economic Environment: Exchange Rates and patterns of trade

• Environment: Global Warming – Kyoto Agreement

• Business and Corporate Culture: Japan & Germany VS UK & US

• Innovation & Technology

• Mergers and Acquisitions

• Firm and Stakeholders - Ethical Issues

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An indicative set of topics to be covered within the module are outlined below.

• Basic Spreadsheet Functionalities: Introduction to common spreadsheet features: workbooks, worksheets, menus, cells, rows, columns, data types, relative and absolute cell addressing, copying, basic formulae, naming cells, formatting, charts and graphs, printing.

• Data Management Facilities: sorting, filtering, data forms, pivot tables.

• What-If Analysis: scenario manager, goal seek, data tables.

• Basic Financial Analysis: Introduction to basic financial analysis and how to carry this out using spreadsheets: compound interest, discounting, NPV, IRR, loans and mortgages.

• Advanced Spreadsheet Functionalities: automating tasks and solving simple optimisation business problems.

• The Art of Modelling: effective methods for designing, building and testing business models.

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The module will begin with an introduction to the link between business and accounting in order to show the value to the students of their having some knowledge of accounting. The module is designed to teach students how to prepare, read and interpret financial information with a view to their being future business managers rather than accountants.

The module will continue with a brief demonstration of double-entry bookkeeping. Students will not be examined on this, it is merely to put bookkeeping and accounting in context. Following on from this, students will be shown how to prepare financial statements from a trial balance and make adjustments to the figures given by acting on information given in a short scenario.

The regulatory framework of financial reporting will be considered as will the annual reports and accounts of a variety of organisations. The module will finish will an analysis of financial statements with students shown how to interpret data and make sensible recommendations

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A synopsis of the curriculum

The module introduces to students the importance of marketing in competitive and dynamic environments.

The key topics of the module are:

• The marketing concept

• The marketing environment

• Market segmentation & targeting

• Brand development and management

• Management of the marketing mix

o Product; including new product development and the marketing of services

o Pricing

o Promotion; including digital media, advertising, sales promotion, publicity, PR, personal sales et al.

o Place

o Extended marketing mix; including people, physical evidence and process

• Ethical issues in marketing

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15

So much of the world of business is based on quantitative information—sales, stock control, investments, loans, production levels, staffing numbers, share prices, interest rates, quality control, etc. etc. In almost any organisation where you work you must expect to deal with numbers. This module introduces you to the way you can make use of quantitative information through statistical analysis.

Topics may include:

The nature and use of numerical information

• Summarising data

• Graphical representation of data: histograms, pie charts, cumulative frequency curves

• Measures of location and dispersion

• Probability, distributions and expected values

• Sampling and its uses

• The ?2 distribution, questionnaire analysis and contingency tables

• Correlation

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This module is for Post-A-level students and students who have mastered level A2 but not yet B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). On successfully completing the module students will have mastered level B1. The emphasis in this course is on furthering knowledge of the structure of the language as well as vocabulary and cultural insights while further developing the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

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This is an intensive module for absolute beginners, Post-GCSE students and students who have not yet mastered level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). On successfully completing the module students will have mastered level A2. The emphasis in this course is on acquiring a sound knowledge of the structure of the language as well as basic vocabulary and cultural insights while developing the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

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30

This module is for Post-A-level students and students who have mastered level A2 but not yet B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). On successfully completing the module students will have mastered level B1. The emphasis in this course is on furthering knowledge of the structure of the language as well as vocabulary and cultural insights while further developing the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

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30

This is an intensive module for absolute beginners, Post-GCSE students and students who have not yet mastered level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). On successfully completing the module students will have mastered level A2. The emphasis in this course is on acquiring a sound knowledge of the structure of the language as well as basic vocabulary and cultural insights while developing the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

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30

This is an intensive module for absolute beginners, Post-GCSE students and students who have not yet mastered level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). On successfully completing the module students will have mastered level A2. The emphasis in this course is on acquiring a sound knowledge of the structure of the language as well as basic vocabulary and cultural insights while developing the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

Read more
30

This module is for Post-A-level students and students who have mastered level A2 but not yet B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). On successfully completing the module students will have mastered level B1. The emphasis in this course is on furthering knowledge of the structure of the language as well as vocabulary and cultural insights while further developing the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

Read more
30

This module is for Post-A-level students and students who have mastered level A2 but not yet B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). On successfully completing the module students will have mastered level B1. The emphasis in this course is on furthering knowledge of the structure of the language, as well as vocabulary and cultural insights, while further developing the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

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30

This is an intensive module for absolute beginners, Post-GCSE students and students who have not yet mastered level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). On successfully completing the module students will have mastered level A2. The emphasis in this course is on acquiring a sound knowledge of the structure of the language as well as basic vocabulary and cultural insights while developing the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

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30

Topics the module will cover include:

• Orientation to studying at university, time management and learning styles.

• Research and cognitive development (writing essays and reports in higher education, research and referencing, plagiarism, how to make a reasoned argument, literature searches and introduction to critical and analytical thinking).

• The theories underlying personal skill development needed to achieve success at university and in the workplace (i.e. effective communication; working in groups, teamwork, problem solving, creative thinking, conflict management and negotiation).

• Personal Development Planning for Employability (including career search, CV writing, and making sense of employer skills requirements).

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Stage 2

Modules may include Credits

A synopsis of the curriculum

Students will be expected to develop the ability to use appropriate techniques of analysis and enquiry within Operations Management and to learn how to evaluate alternatives and make recommendations. Topics include:

• Strategic role of operations and operations strategy

• Design of processes and the implications for layout and flow

• Design and management of supply networks

• Resource planning and management

• Lean systems

• Quality planning and managing improvement

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The module will include:

? The consequence of the entry of formerly closed economies onto the world trading stage

? The motives and impact of systemic changes (privatization, liberalization of trade policies, etc.) on the environment of business in emerging markets

? Trends in emerging markets, especially relating to internal country specific policy reforms

? Distinguishing features of emerging market economies and associated risks in doing business

? Comparative analysis of the similarities and differences between emerging and developing market economies

? Strategic alliances and international business networks in emerging economies

? The challenges of developing flexible and adaptable corporate strategies in emerging markets

? Collaborative arrangements and control strategies in modes of entry and network creation

? Country-specific challenges in enhancing the value proposition from entering and dealing with the select emerging market countries

Explore the shifting dynamic: Emerging challengers from emerging markets -a case of the 'new' multinational.

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The module provides a broad, basic understanding of strategy and strategic management, on which further strategic analysis and exploration of strategic issues can be built. It introduces students to the key vocabulary, concepts and frameworks of strategic management and establishes criteria for assessing whether or not a strategy can be successful. It introduces students to frameworks for analysing the external and internal environments and to different theories of how these relate and of their impact on strategy formulation and implementation.

Students will learn how to identify strategic issues, develop strategic options to address them and decide which option(s) to recommend. Through theoretical readings and case studies, students will develop an appreciation of strategy in different contexts and from different perspectives and of the complexity of strategic decision-making. Students will enhance their ability to read business articles from a strategic perspective and to present strategic arguments in a structured manner

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Business ethics and sustainability are central to contemporary management and thus this module will explore the following topics:

• History, definitions and timeline of society's view on business ethics and sustainability

• Cross-disciplinary approaches to ethics and sustainability

• Role of globalisation, policy and culture

• Ethics and ethical dilemmas

• Change Management, Values, Governance and Leadership

• Sustainable Business Models

• Social Innovation

• Partnerships and collaboration

• Responsible Supply Chain Management

• Environmental Assessment Frameworks and Sustainable Management in practice

• Sustainable Supply Chain Management

• Innovation and creativity

• The role and responses of Corporations, SMEs, Public and not-for-profit organisations

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This module provides a critical introduction to the main theories and debates in International Business and uses these theoretical lenses to explain core phenomena in international business.

• Explaining international economic transactions (trade theories, national competitiveness)

• Explaining the existence of MNEs (internalisation theory, eclectic theory, monopolistic advantages)

• Explaining the coevolution of environment and MNEs (institutional theory, resource dependence theory, evolutionary theory, investment development path, product life cycle theory)

• Explaining the growth and decline of MNEs (stages model, network theory, market entry/expansion modes, transaction cost theory)

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This module offers a critical analysis of how multinationals select their target markets and modes of entry and how they manage their various functions in an international context, balancing the needs for global integration and local responsiveness respectively.

• Managing the internationalisation process

• Country selection

• Choosing and designing entry modes

• Managing collaborative arrangements

• International marketing

• International human resource management

• International supply chain management

• International finance

• Research and development in an international perspective

• Managing multinationals using electronic commerce

• Managing multinationals responsively

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• Nature of research - what is it and who cares?

• Research approaches, Philosophy of thinking and claims; and key methodologies of research.

• Research and consultancy project designs and methodologies (case study, survey, etc): interplay between research questions; analytical and empirical approaches; the relationship between design and method; negotiating access and sampling strategies implications for design choices contextualised for students studying management, technology and enterprise;

• Data collection and analysis: sources of information; questionnaires, interviews, literature reviews, policy documents, observations, measurement, statistical techniques; qualitative data analysis; sources of bias and error; reporting research, etc, contextualised for business and management problem solving;

• Formulating research & consultancy aim(s) and objectives;

• Nature of consultancy and consultancy approaches/interventions;

• Role of management consultancy;

• Research proposal and tender writing, research ethics and project planning.

• The management consulting process;

• Strategy problem solving skills;

• Client engagement;

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Information Systems (IS) are at the heart of every business and pervade almost every aspect of our lives (work, rest and play). Information Systems are treated in this module within the context of the social sciences, offering students a management and organisational perspective on the role of IS in business and how they are managed. This one term module is not technically orientated but designed to show how information systems are conceived, designed, implemented and managed in contemporary organisations.

The aim of this module is to provide students with the methods and approaches used by managers to exploit new digital opportunities and position their organisations to realise enhanced business value. By the end of this module, students will be equipped with the necessary tools to deal with current business issues including digital transformation through information systems and emerging business models via technological innovations.

The first part of the modules looks at the transformations in contemporary organisations and the strategic and operational decisions in managing digital IS in organisations. In particular, we shall see how some organisations have centred themselves on their information systems and highlight critical issues in the debates regarding the use of information technologies in organisations. The second part of the module provides a view of state-of-the-art enterprise systems applications, cloud computing, big data, cyber-defence and social networking/media and Web 2.0 (including mobile) tools and discusses how they are integrated into business life and used to improve organisational performance. The third part focuses on green IS/IT / green business practices and sustainability and core legislative frameworks (DPA, Computer Misuse Act, Intellectual Property).

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Project Management aims to provide an understanding of the key concepts and practices within the context of the organisational setting and the wider business and technological environment.

This module aims to develop a critical understanding of project management to enable students to recognise the importance of the discipline in a variety of organisational and functional contexts. Students should develop a critical understanding of the concepts employed in project management at strategic, systems and operational levels, and an appreciation of the knowledge and skills required for successful project management in organisations.

The key topics of the module are:

1. Project life cycles and alternative development paths

2. Project planning and control techniques, including CPM and PERT

3. Learning and innovation in projects

4. Resource planning

5. Team management and motivation

6. Contracts and incentives

7. Evaluation and returns

8. Stakeholder management

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International and Comparative Human Resource Management aims to provide an analysis of the HRM systems in seven countries: USA, Germany, Sweden, France, Italy, China and India. Students will be introduced to the main concepts and theories through readings and discussions of the main authors in the field.

Within a broad historical context, an international comparative approach will be adopted to consider the development of the relationship between national governments, employers and trade unions. This will include an investigation of the development and decline of employment relations systems and the emergence of human resource management.

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This module facilitates the development of an entrepreneurial mind-set, and equips students with necessary cutting-edge knowledge and skills vital for generating value in a knowledge based economy. The curriculum will include the following areas of study:

• Broader application of entrepreneurship – The definition of "entrepreneurship" has been evolving from a narrow use to denote start-up formation to a broader application in a wide array of settings, leading to the recognition of it as a general framework. The module provides students with a broader understanding of entrepreneurship by covering the unique characteristics and similarities of different types of entrepreneurship including, corporate, start-up, academic, public and citizen, entrepreneurship. This enables students to understand how to act entrepreneurially in different contexts.

• Co-creation as a new form of generating value in an innovation ecosystem – Emerging co-creation initiatives such as living labs, joint research labs, accelerators and social innovation labs highlight how different types of entrepreneurs should work together closely to solve complex challenges by generating business, social and academic benefits. The module discusses the processes, heterogeneous organisational forms, advantages and challenges (with a special emphasis on intellectual property management) of co-creation initiatives, providing students with necessary knowledge and skills to engage in value co-creation with networks of diverse entrepreneurs.

• Managing innovation entrepreneurially – In a knowledge based economy, it is of paramount importance to balance between internal and external R&D activities. The module discusses how relational and internal capabilities of businesses facilitate a wide array of knowledge based interactions such as knowledge exploration, exploitation, transfer and co-production etc. in order to solve challenges that cannot be dealt with in-house.

• Entrepreneurial opportunity – A key for success in entrepreneurship is the identification of opportunities, which is debated as to whether they are recognised, discovered or created. The module discusses the importance of entrepreneurial opportunity by shedding light on this debate.

• Entrepreneurial Motivation – Entrepreneurs could be motivated by 'pull' or ‘push’ factors. The module help students to understand how, when and under what circumstances ‘pull and ‘push’ factors drive entrepreneurship.

• Entrepreneurial Marketing – Complex challenges that we have faced today mean that marketing is not unidirectional flowing from producer to customer, but something co-created with customers. The module discusses how entrepreneurs could co-create a marketing strategy with customers.

• Entrepreneurial Finance – Finance fuels entrepreneurship. The module explores different sources of entrepreneurial finance including traditional and emerging sources by highlighting advantages and disadvantages of each source and its suitability depending on the age and profitability of a venture.

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15

Stage 3

Modules may include Credits

This module examines the issues of global strategic management through the analysis of core strategic imperatives, organisational challenges and managerial implications within the context of a multinational organisation (MNE). This module systematically evaluates different approaches to the internationalisation strategies MNEs undertake and the functional and operational aspects (e.g. finance, value chain management, innovation management, HR management, etc.) these strategies impact on. Furthermore, this module assesses issues such as global management of change, global risk management, global management of corporate social responsibilities, withdrawal and divestment strategies.

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This module will extend students' knowledge and understanding of strategic management and strategic issues. It will introduce a range of contemporary issues associated with the formulation and implementation of corporate and business strategies with an emphasis on identifying and implementing strategic change within the organisation, building dynamic capabilities and developing coherent strategies. Issues might include strategies for a recession, global strategies, knowledge-based strategies, firms and industries, strategies where profit is of secondary (or no) importance. The module will also extend students’ theoretical knowledge by presenting contemporary debates and issues in strategic thinking. The module will use a project in which students identify and suggest possible strategic solutions to a strategic issue in a real organisation to develop students’ ability to link theory and practice in real-life situations.

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Making decisions is one of the most important things any manager or business must do. Making smart decisions, however, can be extremely difficult due the complexity and uncertainty involved. Decision Analysis (DA) provides a structured and coherent approach to decision making. It involves a wide range of quantitative and graphical methods for identifying, representing, and assessing alternatives in order to determine a best course of action. DA is regularly employed by many leading companies in the pharmaceutical, oil and gas, utilities, automotive, and financial services sectors. In this module, you learn about the basic concepts of DA and how to apply it in a variety of practical business planning situations. An indicative list of topics is provided below.

• Introduction to decision making: understanding why decisions are hard, the art of making good decisions, the main building blocks of structured decision making.

• Decision trees: a walk through of the construction and use of decision trees for graphically representing and analysing risky decision problems.

• Expected value decision criterion: a short introduction to probability theory, how to compute expected values, and the use of an expected value decision criteria for solving decision trees.

• Alternative decision criteria: different types of risk attitude and a brief overview of alternative decision criteria for incorporating risk attitude.

• Overview of utility theory: a critical look at expected value and potential problems with using it, the concept of utility and the elicitation of a utility function, the exponential utility function for modelling risk neutral, risk-averse and risk-seeking decision makers.

• Dominance and sensitivity analysis: deterministic and stochastic dominance, tornado diagrams, one-way and two-way sensitivity analysis of probability estimates.

• Value of information: information and decision making, value of perfect information, value of sample information.

• Multi-criteria decision making: the analytical hierarchy process, comparing attributes, scoring alternatives, ranking alternatives, checking for consistency.

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This module will allow students to work on a substantive piece of research which will allow them to obtain in-depth knowledge of a particular subject area within the field of International Business.

• Developing phenomenon-based and/or theory driven research questions in the area of international business

• Literature search and review

• Understanding different research designs used in International Business research projects

• Collection, use and analysis of secondary and primary data

• Preparing and structuring the International Business Project

• Referencing, Citations and Developing writing skills

• Presentation skills

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A synopsis of the curriculum

The curriculum is organised into two parts.

Part I:

Understanding the European Business Environment (Autumn)

The European Business Environment (PESTEL), History and Development of the EU, Political and Institutional Framework of the EU. Impact of EU policies on business operations: from Single Market to Single Currency, EU Competition and Social Policies, Regional Policy and Industrial Policy, EU Trade Policy.

Part II:

Doing Business in the 'New' Europe (Spring)

Formulating a European Business Strategy, Identifying Market Opportunities and Evaluating Modes of Entry. Understanding the impact on business of cultural diversity. Management within a European environment. Finance, Marketing and HRM issues for European Business.

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This module is designed to provide students across the university with access to knowledge, skill development and training in the field of entrepreneurship with a special emphasis on developing a business plan in order to exploit identified opportunities. Hence, the module will be of value for students who aspire to establishing their own business and/or introducing innovation through new product, service, process, project or business development in an established organisation. The module complements students' final year projects in Computing, Law, Biosciences, Electronics, Multimedia, and Drama etc.

The curriculum is based on the business model canvas and lean start up principles (Osterwalder and Pigneur 2010) on designing a business plan for starting a new venture or introducing innovation in an established organisation. It includes the following areas of study:

• The new business planning process and format, developing and evaluating the business idea, producing a business plan, which includes four main sections, namely, business concept, marketing plan, operational plan and financial plan.

• Researching internal and external environment – market research, value co-creation with customers, company’s macro (i.e. PESTEL) and industry (Porter’s five forces) environment analysis, internal company analysis (Resource Based View), external collaborator analysis, and SWOT

• Developing the business concept – Identifying/developing the value proposition, specifying the business offer (i.e. use product anatomy analysis for presentation), deciding an appropriate ownership structure, laying out mission, aims and objectives (i.e. using SMART), and identifying legal formalities including intellectual property strategies.

• Developing the marketing plan – Identifying target customer groups, designing customer relationship management strategies and distribution channels, planning the sales and marketing processes, customer perceptions and customer care, developing quality standards for the business (i.e. using 7 Ps analysis for presentation).

• Developing the operation plan – Identifying key activities to be carried out, matching key activities with resources for an effective and efficient use of resources, planning and employing staff, planning and obtaining premises, physical and financial resources; phased implementation of the business plan.

• Developing the financial plan – Identifying appropriate sources of finance, and evaluating and managing the financial viability of a business by developing Forecast cash flow statement, Sales and Profit account and Profit and Loss Account, a description of the composition of the balance sheet, financial indicator- Breakeven analysis, by highlighting underlying assumptions.

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This module facilitates the development of an entrepreneurial mind-set, and equips students with necessary cutting-edge knowledge and skills vital for generating value in a knowledge based economy. The curriculum will include the following areas of study:

• Broader application of entrepreneurship – The definition of "entrepreneurship" has been evolving from a narrow use to denote start-up formation to a broader application in a wide array of settings, leading to the recognition of it as a general framework. The module provides students with a broader understanding of entrepreneurship by covering the unique characteristics and similarities of different types of entrepreneurship including, corporate, start-up, academic, public and citizen, entrepreneurship. This enables students to understand how to act entrepreneurially in different contexts.

• Co-creation as a new form of generating value in an innovation ecosystem – Emerging co-creation initiatives such as living labs, joint research labs, accelerators and social innovation labs highlight how different types of entrepreneurs should work together closely to solve complex challenges by generating business, social and academic benefits. The module discusses the processes, heterogeneous organisational forms, advantages and challenges (with a special emphasis on intellectual property management) of co-creation initiatives, providing students with necessary knowledge and skills to engage in value co-creation with networks of diverse entrepreneurs.

• Managing innovation entrepreneurially – In a knowledge based economy, it is of paramount importance to balance between internal and external R&D activities. The module discusses how relational and internal capabilities of businesses facilitate a wide array of knowledge based interactions such as knowledge exploration, exploitation, transfer and co-production etc. in order to solve challenges that cannot be dealt with in-house.

• Entrepreneurial opportunity – A key for success in entrepreneurship is the identification of opportunities, which is debated as to whether they are recognised, discovered or created. The module discusses the importance of entrepreneurial opportunity by shedding light on this debate.

• Entrepreneurial Motivation – Entrepreneurs could be motivated by 'pull' or ‘push’ factors. The module help students to understand how, when and under what circumstances ‘pull and ‘push’ factors drive entrepreneurship.

• Entrepreneurial Marketing – Complex challenges that we have faced today mean that marketing is not unidirectional flowing from producer to customer, but something co-created with customers. The module discusses how entrepreneurs could co-create a marketing strategy with customers.

• Entrepreneurial Finance – Finance fuels entrepreneurship. The module explores different sources of entrepreneurial finance including traditional and emerging sources by highlighting advantages and disadvantages of each source and its suitability depending on the age and profitability of a venture.

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15

The aim of this module is to provide students with in-depth knowledge about the accounting and control systems businesses use for making managerial decisions. In particular, the module focuses on profit planning decisions and it gives students a thoughtful understanding of the functioning and range of financial controls managers use for making profit planning decisions, related to both the business as a whole and its segments. Students are expected to conduct a management project: they will prepare a business plan that takes into account strategic, marketing and financial aspects. The module also enables students to know how to use accounting and control tools to assess business performance, provide feedback and give recommendations for improvements aimed to create more socially responsible and sustainable businesses. As such, this module is core to the degree program, because it gives an introduction to three key areas: managerial decision making, performance management and organizational financial management.

• The link between business strategy and management accounting and control.

• The classification of costs by nature, behaviour and decision making relevance.

• Cost, volume profit analysis and its use in profit planning decisions.

• The trade-off between operating profitability and risk.

• Financial controls for profit planning: the functioning of costing systems (job costing and activity based costing) and of budgeting systems. The business plan.

• Financial controls for performance monitoring and evaluation: standard costing, flexible budgets and variance analysis.

• Profit planning decisions for segments of business (products/ services and customers).

• Sources of finance and capital investment decisions.

• Financial controls and corporate social responsibility strategy implementation

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A synopsis of the curriculum

Students will be expected to develop the ability to use appropriate techniques of analysis and enquiry within Operations and Service Management and to learn how to evaluate the alternatives and make recommendations. Topics include:

• The nature of services and service strategy

• Service development and technology

• Service quality and the service encounter

• Project/Event management and control

• Managing capacity and demand in services

• Managing inventories

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The module looks at how digital marketing applications can be used by modern organisations. The module considers the fundamental technologies that support digital marketing along with the regulatory and societal challenges that must be taken into account, for example, privacy and data protection. The methods available to attract customers through digital marketing are covered making a distinction between paid methods, such as sponsored search, and non-paid methods, such as an organisation's own social media assets. Issues around loyalty are considered especially in the context of falling search costs which enable customers to switch providers.

The unique nature of digital products, for example music downloads or video streaming, are outlined with the marketing challenges and opportunities this presents. The module stresses the importance of implementation, using applied examples, and the uncertainty involved.

The digital marketing environment; Enabling technologies for digital marketing; Website design, implementation and analysis; Social media; Social commerce; Customers in the Internet age: knowing, reaching & retaining the customer; Network effects and versioning; Loyalty, Customer Relationship Management and Data Mining; E-Marketing campaigns; Brands in the Internet age; Data protection, privacy and legal issues; Digital marketing and globalisation

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15

This module offers a comprehensive introduction to the area of cross-cultural management research. Based on a critical analysis of the assumptions underlying various approaches to studying national cultures, frameworks are applied to understand cross-cultural issues managers in international organisations may face.

• Different approaches to cross-cultural management

• Traditional approaches to studying cross-cultural management

• Different Levels of culture

• Cultural-frameworks

• Applications of cultural frameworks to managerial problems

• Critical evaluation of traditional approaches to studying cross-cultural management

• Emic vs. Etic approaches to cross cultural management

• Interpretive approaches to cross-cultural management

• Critical approaches to cross-cultural management

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15

This module offers both theoretical frameworks and practical guidance for students to understand and evaluate the entrepreneurial opportunities, global expansion path, entrepreneurial decision making, and entrepreneurial mobility in the context of international entrepreneurship. The overall aim is to obtain a holistic as well as nuanced global perspective related to international entrepreneurship.

• Theories of international entrepreneurship

• International opportunities and global entrepreneurial team

• Entrepreneur's global expansion path

• Born-global firms

• High-impact/ high-growth entrepreneurship

• Entrepreneurial mobility/ transnational entrepreneurs

• Regional entrepreneurship and innovation clusters

• Institutional environment and exit strategy

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15

Macroeconomics for business offers the possibility of analysing economic activity in a national economy and its interrelationships. Emphasis is on understanding the important questions in determination of level of national output, aggregate spending and fiscal policy, money supply and financial crisis, determinants of economic growth and relevant economic policies. The module explains the role of economic policies in addressing economic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theoretical concepts are illustrated from a range of UK economy and international applications.

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15

International and Comparative Human Resource Management aims to provide an analysis of the HRM systems in seven countries: USA, Germany, Sweden, France, Italy, China and India. Students will be introduced to the main concepts and theories through readings and discussions of the main authors in the field.

Within a broad historical context, an international comparative approach will be adopted to consider the development of the relationship between national governments, employers and trade unions. This will include an investigation of the development and decline of employment relations systems and the emergence of human resource management.

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15

This module presents an overview of what work psychology is and its relevance and usefulness in improving our understanding and management of people (including ourselves) at work. Many work places operate sophisticated and expensive systems for assessing the costs and benefits of various workplace elements but often do not extend this to the management of employees. This module aims to demonstrate the benefits of having a comprehensive understanding of the role psychology can play in the management of people in contemporary organizations. Indicative content includes:

• Work psychology

• Individual differences and psychometrics

• Best practice personnel selection

• Stress and well-being

• Motivation

• Stereotypes and group behaviour

• Leadership and diversity

• The dark side of personality

• Political behaviour in the workplace

• The psychology of entrepreneurs

• Using work psychology to enhance employability

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15

Teaching and assessment

We use a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, case-study analysis, group projects and presentations, and computer-based situations. You have approximately 12 hours of class time per week, and regular access to a personal tutor for advice on any matter concerning your studies or your performance on the course.

For language study, teaching takes place in small groups, with regularly assessed work throughout the year. The latest language learning technology is used extensively to support classroom-based learning.

Assessment is by a mixture of coursework and end-of-module examinations, with the examinations normally counting for up to 70% of the marks for each module.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

  • develop understanding and knowledge of a broad range of organisations, their management and the international environment in which they operate
  • provide an academic preparation for a career in international business and management
  • provide a broad, analytical and highly integrated study of business and management issues
  • provide a sound academic base from which students may continue to benefit from lifelong learning skills and personal development
  • develop key intellectual skills, subject-specific and transferable skills with applications to employability and international management
  • integrate theory and practice through a variety of means, including exposure to business issues through employer-based case studies, visits and inputs from practising managers
  • provide students with opportunities to study chosen aspects of business and management in greater depth
  • develop an understanding of the economic, social and cultural environment of business and management in another country (European or Asian)
  • develop skills in a second European language, suitable for use in a business context (where language option is taken).

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • organisations, their environments and the management of people, operations, finance, marketing and organisational strategy
  • social science concepts and theories, and the ability to apply them to business and management contexts
  • contemporary and pervasive issues, deepening core knowledge
  • European and international developments relevant to management.

Intellectual skills

You gain the ability to:

  • critically evaluate arguments and evidence
  • analyse and draw reasoned conclusions to structured and unstructured problems
  • apply core numeracy and IT skills to problems.

Subject-specific skills

You gain the ability to:

  • identify, formulate and solve business problems using qualitative and quantitative tools
  • create, evaluate and assess options in a range of business situations, applying concepts and knowledge
  • communicate effectively, orally and in writing, about business issues
  • apply core numeracy and IT skills to business problems
  • conduct research into business/management issues using a variety of sources and methodologies.

Transferable skills

You gain the ability to:

  • identify and use information from various sources to assess ideas
  • be an effective self manager of time, planning and delivering outputs effectively
  • communicate well, orally and in writing, using a range of media
  • work in groups and apply other interpersonal skills
  • make good use of numeracy and IT skills.

Careers

Graduate destinations

Our International Business graduates find work in public and private sector management and consultancy both overseas and in the UK.

Recent graduates have taken up positions in a wide range of companies and organisations, including:

  • Deloitte
  • KPMG
  • PwC
  • Lloyds Bank
  • Sainsbury’s
  • Tesco
  • Transport for London
  • Yahoo! UK
  • Thames Valley Police
  • Heineken.

Help finding a job

Kent Business School has an excellent international reputation and good links with businesses globally. This network is very useful to students when looking for work in industry. Our qualified careers practitioners provide support to all business undergraduate students for up to three years after graduation.

The University also has a friendly Careers and Employability Service, which can give you advice on how to:

  • apply for jobs
  • write a good CV
  • perform well in interviews.

Career-enhancing skills

You graduate with a solid grounding in core business management concepts, theories and skills, with a particular focus on global business.

To help you appeal to employers, you also learn key transferable skills that are essential for all graduates. These include the ability to:

  • think critically
  • communicate your ideas and opinions
  • manage your time effectively
  • work independently or as part of a team.

You can also gain skills by signing up for one of our Kent Extra activities, such as adding much-sought-after analytical skills to your degree via Kent’s Q-Step Centre or learning a language.

Professional recognition

As a student at Kent Business School, you also have the opportunity to gain the Chartered Management Institute’s (CMI) Level 5 Professional Diploma in Management and Leadership alongside your degree. CMI qualifications are highly sought after by employers.

Independent rankings

Of Business Studies students who graduated from Kent in 2015, 93% were in work or further study within six months (DLHE). Business Studies at Kent was ranked 16th for graduate prospects in The Times Good University Guide 2017.

According to Which? University (2017), the average starting salary for graduates of this degree is ‘high’ at £22,000.

I enjoyed my studies at Kent. Every module gave me an insight or skill that I have found useful in my work.

Sarah Roddis International Business with a Year in Industry

Entry requirements

Home/EU students

The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications. Students offering alternative qualifications should contact us for further advice. 

It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement.

New GCSE grades

If you’ve taken exams under the new GCSE grading system, please see our conversion table to convert your GCSE grades.

International students

The University welcomes applications from international students. Our international recruitment team can guide you on entry requirements. See our International Student website for further information about entry requirements for your country.

If you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes.

Meet our staff in your country

For more advise about applying to Kent, you can meet our staff at a range of international events. 

English Language Requirements

Please see our English language entry requirements web page.

Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of 'pre-sessional' courses in English for Academic Purposes. You attend these courses before starting your degree programme. 

General entry requirements

Please also see our general entry requirements.

Fees

The 2017/18 tuition fees for this programme are:

UK/EU Overseas
Full-time £9250 £13810
Part-time £4625 £6920

UK/EU fee paying students

The Government has announced changes to allow undergraduate tuition fees to rise in line with inflation from 2017/18.

In accordance with changes announced by the UK Government, we are increasing our 2017/18 regulated full-time tuition fees for new and returning UK/EU fee paying undergraduates from £9,000 to £9,250. The equivalent part-time fees for these courses will also rise from £4,500 to £4,625. This was subject to us satisfying the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework and the access regulator's requirements. This fee will ensure the continued provision of high-quality education.

For students continuing on this programme, fees will increase year on year by no more than RPI + 3% in each academic year of study except where regulated.* 

The University will assess your fee status as part of the application process. If you are uncertain about your fee status you may wish to seek advice from UKCISA before applying.

General additional costs

Find out more about accommodation and living costs, plus general additional costs that you may pay when studying at Kent.

Funding

University funding

Kent offers generous financial support schemes to assist eligible undergraduate students during their studies. See our funding page for more details. 

Government funding

You may be eligible for government finance to help pay for the costs of studying. See the Government's student finance website.

The Government has confirmed that EU students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year will still have access to student funding support for the duration of their course.

Scholarships

General scholarships

Scholarships are available for excellence in academic performance, sport and music and are awarded on merit. For further information on the range of awards available and to make an application see our scholarships website.

The Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence

At Kent we recognise, encourage and reward excellence. We have created the Kent Scholarship for Academic Excellence. The scholarship will be awarded to any applicant who achieves a minimum of AAA over three A levels, or the equivalent qualifications (including BTEC and IB) as specified on our scholarships pages.

The scholarship is also extended to those who achieve AAB at A level (or specified equivalents) where one of the subjects is either Mathematics or a Modern Foreign Language. Please review the eligibility criteria.

Students preparing for their graduation ceremony at Canterbury Cathedral

My degree has given me the confidence to work in an international company.

Full-time

Part-time

The Key Information Set (KIS) data is compiled by UNISTATS and draws from a variety of sources which includes the National Student Survey and the Higher Education Statistical Agency. The data for assessment and contact hours is compiled from the most populous modules (to the total of 120 credits for an academic session) for this particular degree programme. Depending on module selection, there may be some variation between the KIS data and an individual's experience. For further information on how the KIS data is compiled please see the UNISTATS website.

If you have any queries about a particular programme, please contact information@kent.ac.uk.