Centre for Heritage

Centre for Heritage

Past conferences

The Conservation of Historic Cities and Sustainable Development (2013)

The Conservation of Historic Cities and Sustainable Development

The first conference on ‘The Conservation of Historic Cities and Sustainable Development’ was held at Stanford Archaeology Centre (Stanford University) on 7 and 8 March 2013. This conference was made possible by generous funding from the France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, with the support of Cergy-Pontoise University (Civilisations et identities culturelles comparées), the consortium Patrima and the Centre for Heritage at Kent. This conference aimed to discuss the implementation of the 2011 UNESCO Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape. 

This event drew participants from France, the UK, US, Mexico, Spain Mozambique, and Malaysia – with backgrounds in academia, cultural resource management, UNESCO, the World Bank, USAID, architecture and planning. It was attended by more than 50 people. This allowed for engagement across the boundaries between a variety of academic and professional disciplines.

This conference discussed ways to ensure an integrated approach to the conservation and development of historic cities. It encouraged an understanding of urban areas, taking into account the layering of cultural and natural attributes. In particular, the focus was on the following:

  • Methods and issues related to mapping and surveying the city’s natural, cultural and human resources.
  • Assessing the vulnerability of urban heritage values to socio-economic pressures, impacts of climate change and related  concerns.
  • Integrating urban heritage values and their vulnerability into a wider framework of city development.

In taking an approach which brought together theory and application across a variety of disciplines, the conference considered how actual policies can be successfully implemented in contemporary cities around the world.

Contributions and discussions highlighted the importance of good governance and a holistic approach to managing the urban landscape, based on evolving values; the importance of involving all stakeholders (particularly local communities, indigenous groups and disfranchised groups) when managing changes to the urban landscape; of baseline data to monitor the evolution of changes to cities as well as of constructed narratives of spaces and their impacts on values and development.

The programme is available here.

Networking over lunch

Networking over lunch

Professor Francesco Bandarin, delivering the Morgan Family Foundation Distinguished Lecture

Professor Francesco Bandarin, delivering the Morgan Family Foundation Distinguished Lecture

The Conservation of Historic Cities and Sustainable Development II (2013)

The Conservation of Historic Cities and Sustainable Development II

The second conference on ‘The Conservation of Historic Cities and Sustainable Development’ was held at the Sorbonne Nouvelle (Paris), and Cergy-Pontoise University on 30 and 31 May 2013.

This conference was made possible by generous funding from the France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, with the support of Cergy-Pontoise University (Civilisations et identities culturelles comparées), the Fondation des Sciences du Patrimoine-Labex Patrima, CREC-CREW (Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3) and the Centre for Heritage at Kent. This conference, like the first one, aimed to discuss the implementation of the UNESCO 2011 Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape. 

This event drew participants from Australia, China, France, the UK, US, Germany and Lebanon It served as a platform for graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, faculty members and experts to engage in an innovative and interdisciplinary conversation by working across the boundaries between a variety of academic and professional disciplines, including archaeology, anthropology, geography, physics, heritage conservation and management, architecture and urban planning.

Contributions and discussions highlighted the intrinsic problem with the idea of ‘historic urban landscapes’ which seems to be about history and the past, whilst developers want modernity and futuristic approach. Papers further stressed the need to take account of the dynamic relationships between rural and urban landscapes, particularly significant for those workers who commute between these two spaces.

Intangible heritage, which can become creative and cultural industries, were also identified as key to ensure the involvement of disfranchised communities. The case of Kingston, Jamaica was taken for discussion. Urban design was also discussed as a facilitator of mobility and social inclusion, as is the case for instance in Cape Town, South Africa.

The programme is available here.

Heritage and its Communities: A Match-Making Conference (2013)

Heritage and its Communities: A Match-Making Conference

‘Heritage and its Communities: A Match-Making Conference’ was organised at the University of Kent on 3 June 2013. Funded by Kent Institute of Advanced Study in the Humanities (KIASH) and the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL), it targeted local and regional academics and professionals in heritage. The aim of this event was to facilitate the formation of new research projects and teams, by matching heritage professionals with academic researchers sharing the same interests. Nineteen speakers registered and a diverse audience of academics and professionals attended the rich sessions, demonstrating the need for such event that bridges the academic and non-academic worlds. Different activities were organised, including presentations of research needs but also details of research projects, to highlight ideas that could be followed, as well as available resources. A speed networking session was staged at lunch time, at the same time as the presentations of the University of Kent hi-tech equipments, such as laser scanning.

 

New Approaches to Heritage Ethics (2014)

New Approaches To Heritage Ethics: Interdisciplinary Conversations On Heritage, Crime, Conflicts and Rights

The Centre for Heritage organised the conference ‘New Approaches to Heritage Ethics: Interdisciplinary conversations on heritage, crime, conflicts and rights’, held at the University of Kent, on 23 and 24 June 2014.

Heritage and ethics are too often considered through the lens of a single, specific theme. For instance, analyses commonly focus on separate topics like crime and heritage (e.g. unlawful excavations, vandalism and the removal or theft of cultural property), conflict and heritage (e.g. war, civil unrest, iconoclasm as well as disputes of competing visions of the past), and rights and heritage (e.g. access to cultural and socio-economic rights through heritage initiatives, in particular for disfranchised groups).

Integrating and expanding upon this prior scholarship, the aim of this conference was to consider these three topics of crime, conflict and rights in relation to heritage in an interrelated and holistic manner. Such a comprehensive framework resulted in novel approaches to understanding and conceptualizing each of these issues, as well as laying the groundwork for new practical approaches to protecting various rights while mitigating heritage crime and conflicts. This conference also aimed to enable academics, heritage, museum and law enforcement professionals, students and community leaders to engage in an innovative and productive conversation with one another. In working across the traditional boundaries that separate the great diversity of academic and professional disciplines whose work all touches upon this burgeoning field – including archaeology, anthropology, sociology, criminology, history, economics, human rights, law, and heritage conservation and management – this conference opened up new and important lines of cooperation and inquiry.

Full details are available on the conference blog

 

Managing Change (2016)

This conference aims to facilitate a critical interdisciplinary dialogue on the following questions: How do we both conserve urban sites and embrace development? What are the existing operational stratergies for managing change and 'preserving' urban heritage in the long term? What are the primary challenges that urban conservation currently faces? What role can digital technology play in this context?

https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/managing-change/

 

Home (2018)

Thanks to generous funding from the Postgraduate Experience Award Fund, six heritage walks, focusing on the connection between engagement with heritage and wellbeing, will take place during the summer term of 2018. This exciting programme of walks include visits to some of Kent’s remarkable historic villages and monuments, archaeological sites and places of natural beauty.  The programme with a short description and dates can be found below.  Click the tabs above to read about the walks in more detail and to sign up.

Conditions to apply for funded places:

  1. Funding is only available to registered postgraduate students of the University of Kent.
  2. The walks have been organised into three catagories.  Category 1: Dover, Richborough Fort and Tilmanstone have expensive travel costs and entrance fees.  Students may only receive one funded place in this category.  Category 2: The Pilgrim’s Way and A History of Walking and Wandering in England – one place per student.  Category 3: Bigbury Camp and A Walk into Wellbeing – open to all and no limit as these walks have no costs involved.  Postgraduate students will each be able to sign up for a total of 4 out of the 6 walks.
  3. The walks are open to anyone, including Undergraduates or friends and family not affiliated with the University, but there would be no provision to cover costs for transportation or admissions to sites.

 

Programme of Heritage Walks:

15 May, 2018

‘Bigbury Camp – Exploring Canterbury’s Ancient Beginnings’ – Get steeped in Canterbury’s ancient heritage and see where the ancient tribe of the Canti took its final stand against Julius Caesar’s 7th Legion with PhD student Karl Goodwin, Classics and Archaeology.

19 May, 2018

‘A history of walking and wandering in England’– a circular walk starting in historic Teynham with Ann Kinzer, PhD student in Comparative Literature.

1 June, 2018

‘Managing layers of History at Dover Castle’ – led by Philip Smither,  PhD student Classics and Archaeology.

5 June, 2018 (distance: 7 miles)

‘Walking the Pilgrims Way’ – exploring Canterbury’s history of pilgrimage from Chilham to Canterbury with Julia Peters, PhD student in Classics and Archaeology

11 June, 2018

“A walk into well-being”– understanding what’s happening to our minds when we walk in nature. Walk through Blean Woods with Courtney Allen, PhD student, Psychology.

15 June, 2018

Tilmanstone Colliery and the East Kent Railway – a walk through the coal fields of Kent and a ride on a heritage railway with PhD student Luke Shoveller, SSPSSR.

28 June, 2018

‘Britain’s Roman Past’ – a walk from Sandwich to Richborough Roman Fort with Philip Smither, PhD student Classics and Archaeology.

 

Heritage and Wellbeing Workshop (2018)

Organised by: The Centre for Heritage, University of Kent

Date: 7-8 June, 2018

Location: The Beaney House of Art and Knowledge, Learning Lab, Canterbury

Social prescribing of arts and culture, in which primary care patients are referred by medical practitioners to community programmes, is increasingly gaining traction within the health services as an alternative or compliment to medications for the enhancement of health and wellbeing.   Beginning with the development of art therapy in the 1940s, social prescribing of arts and culture has now extended to such contexts as museums and heritage sites.  Where health services are pushed to their limits and much of their vital resources being used to address symptoms linked to loneliness, depression, stress and anxiety, the potential benefits to the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities from engagement with museums and heritage sites presents a new role for museums and heritage organisations to explore.

This two-day workshop, organised by the Centre for Heritage at the University of Kent and funded by the Eastern ARC consortium of UKC, Essex and UEA, has been designed for academics, students and heritage practitioners interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the potential for heritage sites within social prescribing.

The programme will focus on the following topics:

  • The potential for places of heritage to maximise health and wellbeing benefits to local communities and visitors.
  • Programmes in social prescribing currently being run in the UK within museums and heritage sites and the data supporting benefits to participants.
  • The use of digital technology to allow greater access to the health benefits of heritage sites and methods for tracking the impact.

 

 

School of European Culture & Languages, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NX

Enquiries: +44 (0)1227 827159 or email the School of European Culture & Languages

Last Updated: 28/03/2018