Teaching

HEA Route to Recognition (Fellow/Senior Fellow)

Writing Retreats

All retreats run from 09:30 to 15:00 and will be Via Teams. Please click on the link below to book via Eventbrite

The aim is to use dedicated writing time to progress writing of your claim for recognition in a supportive, non-surveillance environment. Typically, Writing Retreats start at 9.30 am and end at 3.00 pm. The aim is to consider the UKPSF, the requirements of a claim, and make time to write your application with guidance. To help you develop a clear trajectory for continuing to submission. Content and delivery pivot on enabling all participants to make clear associations between their practice and the category of HEA fellowship for which they wish to apply. You can join the HEA Writing Retreat for the day, or for part of the day.

The aim of a a structured writing retreat is to use dedicated writing time to progress writing of your claim for recognition in a supportive, non-surveillance environment. All individuals write together in the same room using the same programme of writing slots and refreshment/discussion breaks. There is a prompt 9.30 am start with refreshments available. The day ends at 3 pm.  You may wish to read: Murray and Newton (2009) Writing retreat as structured intervention: Margin or mainstream? Higher Education Research and Development: 28: 5 (527 – 39).

  •  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external website.HEA Fellowship is a teaching and learning in higher education award, not a qualification in being an academic. The Fellowships of the HEA are concerned with teaching and learning in higher education. Other aspects of the educational role such as research, involvement in academic societies, administrations etc., may be relevant to the Fellowship application, but only in as much as they relate to learning and teaching in higher education
  • HEA Fellowship is a teaching and learning in higher education award, and not recognised for a long career. It is tempting to include everything you have done throughout your career, but it is not a recognition for everything you have done throughout your career. The danger in trying to cover everything is that you end up with a descriptive list of activities which doesn’t show the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ elements of the examples you are giving which is crucial. Teaching outside higher education and other work/ or outside work experience may be relevant, but only insofar that it relates to learning and teaching in higher education. This may involve leaving out the achievements of which you are most proud.
  • HEA Fellowship is a teaching and learning in higher education award, and not a reward for good character. Getting on well with colleagues, being liked and appreciated by others and being a helpful person are all excellent qualities. However, fellowships are not awarded for being a nice person or having people say beautiful things about you, but showing evidence of your learning and teaching practice.
  • The Fellowship application is not just about what you have done, but what you have learnt from that experience and its impact on your future practice. In your application story your decision-making process, if you changed an element of a programme, module or assessment – what were your aims? Include the outcome and impact of your work.
  • Remember to focus on teaching and learning in higher education. Other qualifications are awarded for teaching in (or learning to teach in) sectors other than higher education.  These experiences may be relevant to your practice of teaching and learning in higher education, but they are not substitutes for learning and teaching in higher education.
  • Remember that teaching and learning in higher education takes many forms. Academic development, developing teaching materials, pedagogic research in higher education and designing and delivering workshops are all suitable examples of teaching and learning and in higher education and supporting these activities.  Assessment can be formative, as well as summative. Students can be colleagues or professionals, as well as undergraduate and postgraduate students.
  • Remember to explicitly reference the professional values, core knowledge and areas of activity in the UKPSF as appropriate to your Descriptor. This is central to the process and should be explicitly referenced in your application.  Do not rely on the assessors to spot the relevance of each activity or case study, to the UKPSF.
  • Remember to be reflective. The Fellowship application is not just about what you have done, but what you have learnt from that experience and its impact on your future practice.
  • Remember to demonstrate that you are familiar with literature or theory on teaching and learning in higher education. Like any other scholarly field, there is a vast literature around teaching and learning in higher education. You don’t need to be an expert, but evidence of engagement with the literature is essential.  This literature can ‘generic’ and/or specific to your discipline.
  • Remember, Fellowship is an individual award. Teamwork is good, but the HEA fellowships are awards for individuals.  If describing a team activity, make your role clear.  Be careful how you use the pronoun ‘we’ and how you write about “The department”, “The centre”, “The project team”, “My colleague” etc.  Instead say “My influence” “I led on this component”, etc., to show your work
  • For D2 and D3, the supporting statements are an essential part of the Claim: people you might choose when applying for a job are not necessarily the most appropriate for commenting on your teaching and learning practice.  Think about which colleagues are best placed to provide your supporting statements.

A general overview of the retreat

In the first 30 mins of the session, you will discuss your impact on learning and teaching. If you can discuss events beyond working with and supporting students, you may be able to show that, you influence others and make a claim for SFHEA.

  • Consider your influence: is broad: going to schools, outreach, supporting teachers in schools. 
  • What are your spheres of influence support for technology-enhanced learning, etc.?
  • Look at UKPSF: how do your thoughts match the values of UKPSF? What dimension of Fellowship is similar to your reflections
  • Can you develop and write two case studies in response to those values?
  • Write up the two case studies
  • 30 min of writing the bare bones of the two case studies
  • Partner up with someone you don’t know/not from your school spend 15 min each of talking to each other, going through the UKPSF. See what’s missing.  Don’t worry; these areas can be covered in your reflective account.
  • Write solidly for an hour: why did you do it? What did you do? What impact did it have? What is the impact intended?

 

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Last Updated: 08/02/2021