School of Psychology

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Lauren Spinner

Research Associate

Research

Research Interests

I am primarily interested in children’s gender development and the effect of socialising agents, such as parents and the media, on children’s gender-related cognitions. During my PhD I specifically examined the impact of these agents on children’s gender stereotypes and toy preferences, using both implicit and explicit measures. I have also explored interventions to reduce children’s gender stereotypic attitudes via exposure to gender counter-stereotypic models. More generally, I am interested all aspects of children’s social and cognitive development; how children come to understand their social worlds, how this understanding is related to the emergence of cognitive abilities, and the parallels between parents’ and children’s attitudes and behaviours. Owing to my work with People United, an organisation which aims to increase kindness within communities via arts participation, I have also developed a keen interest in how engagement with the arts can foster pro-social behaviour, and which factors mediate this relationship.

The project I am currently working on with Professor Joachim Stoeber, Professor David Williams, and Dr Mike Forrester is examining the development of the perfectionism in 5-7 year old children, and how this may be related to parent perfectionism.

Thesis Title

'Socialising Gender: The Role of Parents, Peers, and the Media in Children's Gender-Typed Preferences and Stereotypes'

Conference Presentations

  • Spinner, L., Cameron, L., & Ferguson, H. (2017). Children and parent’s implicit gender stereotypes: Evidence from eye-tracking analysis. Presentation at Cafe Psychology, University of Kent, December 7th 2017.
  • Spinner, L., Cameron, L., & Calogero, R. (2017). Peer toy play as a gateway to children’s gender flexibility: The effect of (counter)stereotypic portrayals of peer models in children’s magazines. Presentation at European Conference on Developmental Psychology, Utrecht University, 1st September, 2017.
  • Spinner, L., Cameron, L., & Calogero, R. (2017). Peer toy play as a gateway to children’s gender flexibility: The effect of (counter)stereotypic portrayals of peer models in children’s magazines. Presentation at EASP Meeting: Gender Roles in the Future? Theoretical Foundations and Future Research Directions, Free University of Berlin, 26th June, 2017.
  • Spinner, L., Van de Vyver, J., & Abrams, D. (2017). The arts as a social psychological catalyst for human prosociality and cooperation. Presentation at the Beyond Words conference, Plymouth University, March 15th, 2017.
  • Spinner, L. & Cameron, L. (2017). Exploring the role of gender socialising agents, including parents and the media, on children's gender stereotypes and flexibility around toy play. Invited lecture at Canterbury Christ church University, February 21st, 2017.
  • Spinner, L., Cameron, L., & Ferguson, H. (2016). Children and parent’s implicit gender stereotypes: Evidence from eye-tracking analysis. Presentation at the Post-Graduate Symposium, University of Kent, September 28th, 2016.
  • Spinner, L. & Cameron, L. (2015). Pink cars and blue tea sets: What drives children’s toy preferences and gender stereotypes? Poster presented at the Post-Graduate Symposium, University of Kent, September 23rd, 2015.
  • Spinner, L. & Cameron, L. (2014). Strategic colour-blindness in children. Poster presentation at Equity and Justice in Childhood and Adolescence, Goldsmiths University of London, May 23rd, 2014
  • Spinner, L. & Cameron, L. (2014). Strategic colour-blindness in children. Poster presented at BPS Social Psychology Conference, Canterbury Christ Church University, September 9th, 2014
  • Spinner, L. & Cameron, L. (2014). Developmental changes in strategic colour-blindness. Presentation at Meeting 1 of the BPS funded research seminar series ‘Growing up with Diversity’, April 29th, 2014.

Publications

  • Spinner, L., Cameron, L., & Calogero, R. (2018). Peer Toy Play as a Gateway to Children’s Gender Flexibility: The Effect of (Counter) Stereotypic Portrayals of Peers in Children’s Magazines. Sex Roles. http://rdcu.be/FSZg
  • Spinner, L., Cameron, L., & Ferguson, H. (Under review). Children and parent’s looking preferences for gender-typed toys: Evidence from eye-tracking analysis. Child Development.
  • Spinner, L., Cameron, L., & Tenenbaum, H. (In preparation). The prevalence of gender-typed messages in pre-school children’s magazines.
 

 

School of Psychology - Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP

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Last Updated: 31/01/2018